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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
The debut novel of a 30-year-old author born in the Baltimore area and now living in Owings Mills is landing higher and higher on Amazon.com 's list of top-selling new releases in gay paperback fiction. Jeremy Scott Blaustein attended the Carver Center for Arts & Technology in Towson, studied theater at Shenandoah University and was an award-winning Broadway producer for six years before returning to the Baltimore area about a year ago to begin writing his novel, "The Home for Wayward Ladies" -- about three gay friends fresh out of theater school and living in Manhattan.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
When the writer Peter Mehlman was working on the television show "Seinfeld," he could be counted on to come up with the tiniest, most insignificant - and ultimately, the most memorable - plots. It was Mehlman, now 58 and a Los Angeles resident, who explored snack-eating etiquette at parties, and Mehlman who decided that the show's female lead, Elaine, would hoard contraceptive sponges. And it was Mehlman who coined several catchphrases that have entered the cultural lexicon, from "yada yada" to gloss over a conversation, "sponge-worthy" to describe a hot date and "double-dipping" to refer to the practice of dunking a snack into a sauce at a party, taking a bite and then dunking it again into the same container.
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By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | February 1, 2004
The Book of Flying, by Keith Miller. Riverhead Books. 272 Pages. $23.95. In this original compendium of tales, a pale librarian and poet named Pico, in a city by the sea, falls in love with a beautiful winged girl named Sisi. To be one with her, he must grow wings, and so he sets forth on the journey that is this book to the "Morning City." Picaresque in structure, rejecting realism as an unnecessary encumbrance, The Book Of Flying is an extraordinary debut novel. Each tale is in search of what is good and sustaining in human existence: roast duckling and peppercorn pate; the writing of poetry; the consolations of a steadfast companion; knowledge ("how can we live in a world we do not comprehend?"
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
The debut novel of a 30-year-old author born in the Baltimore area and now living in Owings Mills is landing higher and higher on Amazon.com 's list of top-selling new releases in gay paperback fiction. Jeremy Scott Blaustein attended the Carver Center for Arts & Technology in Towson, studied theater at Shenandoah University and was an award-winning Broadway producer for six years before returning to the Baltimore area about a year ago to begin writing his novel, "The Home for Wayward Ladies" -- about three gay friends fresh out of theater school and living in Manhattan.
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By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2009
A new year signifies a fresh start, so it only seems appropriate to devote the first column of 2009 to a trio of debut crime novels. The Rules of the Game By Leonard Downie Jr. Knopf / 321 pages / $25.95 Just a few months before the publication of this, his debut novel, Downie left his longtime post as The Washington Post's executive editor. So it's only natural that The Rules of the Game would have less to do with Jean Renoir and more to do with the intricate dance between journalists on the campaign trail and political operatives who alternately want their message to emerge but keep more embarrassing exploits well-hidden.
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By Dave Rosenthal | December 13, 2012
The Golden Globe nominees have a heavy literary bent this year, with a large number of adaptations featured in the key categories. Just consider the two "best picture" categories, which draw from novels and non-fiction books that have topped the best-seller lists -- or, in some cases, were sleepers that will draw many more readers now. (I, for one, can't wait to read more about the historic background behind "Lincoln. ") Here's a quick summary of some leading adaptations (and one movie tie-in)
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By Dave Rosenthal | February 25, 2013
To find the inspiration behind the actors, actresses and others who hoisted Oscars last night, look no further than the works in your nearest library, bookstore or e-reader. The big winners were drawn from characters in adaptations that ranged from a mid-19th Century novel to modern magazine articles. It's another sign that the lifeblood of the movie industry is not glitz and glamour, but rather the imagination of an author toiling alone at a kitchen table. Here is a look at some notable winners, and the works that led to the movie.  -- Director: Ang Lee for "Life of Pi," from the Yann Martel novel about spirituality.
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By Dave Rosenthal | December 31, 2012
After watching the movie "Silver Linings Playbook," which is sure to garner lots of Academy Award nominations, I thought we should create another category: Best scene by a book. (If you don't mind spoilers, you can get a taste of the scene in the preview for the movie. ) The works of Ernest Hemingway figure into the plot of the movie, about the unlikely romance of two troubled young people. And "A Farewell to Arms," makes a hilarious appearance -- and exit -- in one key scene.
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By L'Oreal Thompson | September 10, 2012
As a self-described hopeless romantic, it's no surprise that Ellicott City resident Stephanie Verni recently published a love story. Earlier this year, Verni, 47, added author to her already extensive résumé, which includes her current position as an assistant professor of business communications at Stevenson University, where she teaches courses in magazine, feature and public relations writing. Before that she spent 13 years as a publishing professional for the Baltimore Orioles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
When the British author Chris Cleave published his debut novel, "Incendiary," he fell victim to perhaps the worst historical coincidence ever to afflict an author. The book, about a terrorist attack in a London sports stadium, was released on July 7, 2005 - the same day that three suicide bombers detonated their devices in the London underground transit system. Cleave's publishers yanked "Incendiary" off the shelves and canceled Cleave's book tour. He was so depressed that for a time he stopped writing.
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By Dave Rosenthal | February 25, 2013
To find the inspiration behind the actors, actresses and others who hoisted Oscars last night, look no further than the works in your nearest library, bookstore or e-reader. The big winners were drawn from characters in adaptations that ranged from a mid-19th Century novel to modern magazine articles. It's another sign that the lifeblood of the movie industry is not glitz and glamour, but rather the imagination of an author toiling alone at a kitchen table. Here is a look at some notable winners, and the works that led to the movie.  -- Director: Ang Lee for "Life of Pi," from the Yann Martel novel about spirituality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
In one way or another, Manil Suri has spent his entire life charting what happens when polar opposites are brought together in unexpected and at times startling juxtapositions. Suri, 53, is an acclaimed novelist, and a career mathematician who teaches at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He spent the first two decades of his life in India and the past three in the United States. Though all his books to date have been set in Mumbai, they are written in English. Suri's debut novel, "The Death of Vishnu," set off a bidding war between 11 publishing houses in 2001.
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By Dave Rosenthal | January 10, 2013
The Oscar nominees for best picture owe a huge debt to books -- and the creativity of authors. Most of the top films are screen versions of tales that were woven by printed words (or digitized versions). That's not taking anything away from the writers who adapt a novel or work of non-fiction. I'm slogging my way through Victor Hugo's Les Miserables now, and it is a wonder that a hit musical and movie could be distilled from the sprawling 1800s. Here are other adaptations that join Les Mis in the best picture category: -- "Lincoln," drawn from " Team of Rivals" by Doris Kearns Goodwin.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | December 31, 2012
After watching the movie "Silver Linings Playbook," which is sure to garner lots of Academy Award nominations, I thought we should create another category: Best scene by a book. (If you don't mind spoilers, you can get a taste of the scene in the preview for the movie. ) The works of Ernest Hemingway figure into the plot of the movie, about the unlikely romance of two troubled young people. And "A Farewell to Arms," makes a hilarious appearance -- and exit -- in one key scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
When the British author Chris Cleave published his debut novel, "Incendiary," he fell victim to perhaps the worst historical coincidence ever to afflict an author. The book, about a terrorist attack in a London sports stadium, was released on July 7, 2005 - the same day that three suicide bombers detonated their devices in the London underground transit system. Cleave's publishers yanked "Incendiary" off the shelves and canceled Cleave's book tour. He was so depressed that for a time he stopped writing.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | September 10, 2012
As a self-described hopeless romantic, it's no surprise that Ellicott City resident Stephanie Verni recently published a love story. Earlier this year, Verni, 47, added author to her already extensive résumé, which includes her current position as an assistant professor of business communications at Stevenson University, where she teaches courses in magazine, feature and public relations writing. Before that she spent 13 years as a publishing professional for the Baltimore Orioles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
When the writer Peter Mehlman was working on the television show "Seinfeld," he could be counted on to come up with the tiniest, most insignificant - and ultimately, the most memorable - plots. It was Mehlman, now 58 and a Los Angeles resident, who explored snack-eating etiquette at parties, and Mehlman who decided that the show's female lead, Elaine, would hoard contraceptive sponges. And it was Mehlman who coined several catchphrases that have entered the cultural lexicon, from "yada yada" to gloss over a conversation, "sponge-worthy" to describe a hot date and "double-dipping" to refer to the practice of dunking a snack into a sauce at a party, taking a bite and then dunking it again into the same container.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2009
A new year signifies a fresh start, so it only seems appropriate to devote the first column of 2009 to a trio of debut crime novels. The Rules of the Game By Leonard Downie Jr. Knopf / 321 pages / $25.95 Just a few months before the publication of this, his debut novel, Downie left his longtime post as The Washington Post's executive editor. So it's only natural that The Rules of the Game would have less to do with Jean Renoir and more to do with the intricate dance between journalists on the campaign trail and political operatives who alternately want their message to emerge but keep more embarrassing exploits well-hidden.
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