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By Andrew Leckey | September 11, 1991
Q.What are your thoughts on Mesa Limited Partnership? I've followed it for some time and can't decide about the value of this investment.A. Low natural gas prices are the underlying problem.That, coupled with a heavy debt load, should limit the performance of Mesa Limited Partnership (around $2 a share, New York Stock Exchange), a firm specializing in oil and gas exploration and production, said Frederick Leuffer, analyst with C.J. Lawrence, Morgan Grenfell Inc.Although Leuffer switched his "sell" recommendation to a "hold" this summer, he holds little enthusiasm for the shares of this firm run by famous entrepreneur T. Boone Pickens Jr."
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NEWS
December 28, 2011
Counter-cyclical stimulus spending makes sense during business cycle recessions, which is not the kind of recession we're currently in. We're recovering from a single event - the 2008 collapse of America's debt-based economic model after a spending binge that was, admittedly, quite fun while it lasted. Once consumers get their debt loads down to manageable levels, they'll begin spending again, which is projected to happen in 2015 - unless, of course, 2015 comes and the governments owe so much money that taxes have to be significantly raised to pay back years and years of "stimulus.
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NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1996
The brief financial statement that went out with the Columbia Association's annual assessment bill last month suggests, at first glance, that the nation's largest homeowners association will spend only $1.7 million this year for interest payments.But the association's total payments on its debt are much greater -- something only hinted at on the financial statement by an asterisk and a footnote in small type.This fiscal year, the association will spend $12.7 million on interest and principal payments -- or 34 percent of its budget.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2008
Largest U.S. producer of chicken files Ch. 11 MILWAUKEE : Pilgrim's Pride Corp. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection yesterday, hurt like other meat producers by volatile feed prices and slumping demand but also hobbled by an unmanageable debt load. The Pittsburg, Texas-based company, the nation's largest chicken producer, sought protection in a filing with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of Texas, saying that as of Sept. 27 it had $3.75 billion in assets and $2.72 billion in debts.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith-Hopkins and Jamie Smith-Hopkins,Sun Reporter | April 7, 2007
At about the same time Tribune Co. plans to take on billions of dollars in debt to go private under a transaction announced earlier this week, the company will have a chance to buy eight former Times Mirror Co. properties - including The Baltimore Sun Co.'s downtown headquarters and nearly 60-acre printing facility - for the below-market price of $175 million. That price will be available only in January 2008, at a time when some analysts said the company's heavy debt load from the deal with Chicago real estate mogul Samuel Zell to go private may make it difficult to finance the purchase.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
Prime commercial land in Howard County sells for $700,000 an acre while new office buildings stand partly - or completely - empty. Newly assessed county homes are worth roughly one-third more this year, state officials say, but taxes on those homes won't provide the $86.3 million requested for new school construction. It is a tough year for predicting how much money county government should spend or borrow, what with rumors of huge state budget cuts and the prospect of war in Iraq. But a 20-member Spending Affordability Committee appointed to advise the county executive is going to try. Raymond S. Wacks, the county budget director, started the committee's annual deliberations yesterday, and a final report from the group is expected by late next month before County Executive James N. Robey makes his final budget decisions.
NEWS
October 25, 1993
In some editions of The Evening Sun Oct. 25 an editorial misstated Harford County's debt load. The correct total of principal and interest is $190 million, according to the county treasurer. The Evening Sun regrets the error.Harford County's sale of $53.7 million in new municipal bonds this week represents a savings of $1 million for taxpayers. Two-thirds of the money will be used to pay off older, higher-interest rate bonds floated by the county in the past. The rest will be used for public school projects, the apprenticeship training center of Harford Community College and capping of the closed Tollgate landfill.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2000
WILMINGTON, Del. -- Integrated Health Services Inc. hopes to use its bankruptcy reorganization to "restructure the balance sheet through deduction of debt load," Daniel J. Booth, senior vice president of finance, told a creditors' meeting yesterday. Booth said a sale of assets was being considered, but "it's a little early to say exactly what we're going to do." The Sparks-based nursing home chain had said more than a year ago that it might sell its RoTech division, which provides home respiratory services and durable medical equipment.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
Black & Decker Corp. yesterday said it would sell its defense-related PRC Inc. to Litton Industries Inc. by next month and use the $425 million it will get to reduce a debt load that has been a nagging problem since its 1989 acquisition of Emhart Corp.PRC, which came with the deal when Black & Decker bought Emhart for its Kwikset lock and Price Pfister faucet units, had been offered for sale twice before.The Towson company canceled plans to auction PRC privately in 1990 and canceled a planned initial public offering of PRC in 1992, both after the company failed to command a price Black & Decker would accept.
BUSINESS
By Victor F. Zonana and Leslie Helm and Victor F. Zonana and Leslie Helm,Los Angeles Times | October 30, 1991
NEW YORK -- Time Warner Inc. -- moving to lighten its enormous debt load and improve its access to overseas markets -- agreed yesterday to sell a 12.5 percent stake in its historic Warner Bros. studio and its cable television operations, including HBO, to two Japanese companies for $1 billion.The agreement with electronics-maker Toshiba Corp. and trading giant C. Itoh & Co. Ltd. is a big step toward fulfilling Time Warner Chairman Steven J. Ross' vision of a global, vertically integrated, entertainment industry powerhouse, analysts said.
NEWS
By Thomas S. Mulligan and Michael Hiltzik and Thomas S. Mulligan and Michael Hiltzik,LOS ANGLES TIMES | August 20, 2007
As Tribune Co. shareholders prepare to convene in Chicago tomorrow to vote on an $8.4 billion buyout led by investor Sam Zell, the noise in the background is Wall Street traders chirping that the deal might never get done - at least as proposed. Amid one of the most turbulent summers in years for the stock market, Tribune shares have slid steadily and steeply. The stock closed Friday at $25.67, just a few dimes above a multiyear low and 25 percent below the $34 offering price. The main reason for the investor skepticism is the heavy debt load that Tribune will be carrying after it goes private, plus the continuing decline in advertising revenue and cash flow from the company's TV stations and newspapers, including The Sun, the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times and Newsday.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith-Hopkins and Jamie Smith-Hopkins,Sun Reporter | April 7, 2007
At about the same time Tribune Co. plans to take on billions of dollars in debt to go private under a transaction announced earlier this week, the company will have a chance to buy eight former Times Mirror Co. properties - including The Baltimore Sun Co.'s downtown headquarters and nearly 60-acre printing facility - for the below-market price of $175 million. That price will be available only in January 2008, at a time when some analysts said the company's heavy debt load from the deal with Chicago real estate mogul Samuel Zell to go private may make it difficult to finance the purchase.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2005
Towson University officials said yesterday that the school will not house students as part of a development planned for downtown Towson, pleasing residents who don't want a dormitory in the heart of the county seat. Alan Leberknight, interim vice president and chief financial officer of Towson University, said the decision to reject a bid by Heritage Properties and the Cordish Co. to build a 600-bed dormitory in Towson was based on how much debt the public university system would have had to carry and not on the community's opposition.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart | July 3, 2005
Meka Payne is living her own worst-case scenario. As she struggles under the weight of nearly $30,000 in debt and income that doesn't meet her expenses, the 24-year-old single mom's rent is soaring 29 percent next month. Even if she could scrape together enough money to pay for a move to a cheaper place, chances are slim that a landlord would agree to a lease after looking at her credit report. If she stays, the added living expense could push her into bankruptcy. "You can't afford to move and you can't afford to stay," said Catherine Williams, a veteran debt counselor tapped by Money Makeover to help Payne chart a new course.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA | August 22, 2004
MANY RUNNING enthusiasts I know don't particularly like treadmills. They argue that for all the energy you expend, you never get anywhere. I was reminded of them when Dean Miner of Utah State University's cooperative extension program talked about the people he helps who are facing debt. "They often feel that nothing they do will make any difference," Miner said. That sentiment can start early. In 2002, the average student loan debt was $18,900, and students slinging credit cards typically carried $1,600 in balances, according to Nellie Mae, a college lender based in Braintree, Mass.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | May 30, 2004
I OWN shares of Verizon Communications Inc., and I'm disappointed with how it has performed. What is your view of this stock? - G.T., via the Internet The wireless boom is a big plus for the nation's largest telephone company, whose frequent commercials pose the question: "Can you hear me now?" Its wireless subscriber base rose 17 percent in its most recent quarter as it added 1.4 million customers. Verizon Wireless, its 55 percent-owned partnership with Vodafone, is the nation's largest wireless company.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 15, 1994
NEW YORK -- As the midnight deadline neared last night in the long-running takeover battle for Paramount Communications, even executives close to QVC Network conceded that Viacom had apparently won.But even if Viacom has succeeded in its five-month struggle with QVC, there were indications yesterday that the merged Viacom-Paramount might face even greater financial pressures than have been expected.The problems involve Viacom's plan to strengthen its hand by also acquiring Blockbuster Entertainment, the leader in video rentals.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | January 30, 1991
The name is bonds.Government bonds.And Carroll is turning to selling them in larger numbers than ever before as this once-rural county grapples with growth in the middleof a deepening recession.General obligation bonds -- and other sources of state-backed borrowed money, such as industrial bonds -- are hardly new to Carroll, but their use here has been limited until about five years ago.Carroll has racked up the smallest debt load in the five-county Baltimore-metro area and one of the smallest in thestate.
BUSINESS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2003
With a slimmed-down portfolio centered around upscale retail malls and development, the Rouse Co. is hoping to improve its image on Wall Street and business flexibility by raising its credit rating - an effort led by the company's new executive vice president, chief financial officer and heir apparent, Thomas J. DeRosa. At the company's annual stockholders meeting yesterday in Columbia, DeRosa spoke to an audience of more than 600 after chief executive Anthony W. Deering reviewed the company's performance of the past year and shared the company's outlook for 2003.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
Prime commercial land in Howard County sells for $700,000 an acre while new office buildings stand partly - or completely - empty. Newly assessed county homes are worth roughly one-third more this year, state officials say, but taxes on those homes won't provide the $86.3 million requested for new school construction. It is a tough year for predicting how much money county government should spend or borrow, what with rumors of huge state budget cuts and the prospect of war in Iraq. But a 20-member Spending Affordability Committee appointed to advise the county executive is going to try. Raymond S. Wacks, the county budget director, started the committee's annual deliberations yesterday, and a final report from the group is expected by late next month before County Executive James N. Robey makes his final budget decisions.
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