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NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 1, 2008
The paper unemployment check will soon be a thing of the past for Maryland residents who file for the insurance benefit starting today. In its place comes plastic. The state's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation will issue prepaid debit cards to people seeking unemployment insurance benefits and forgo the use of paper checks for new applicants. Department officials said the switch to plastic will save taxpayers about $400,000 annually in postage, paper, staff time and other processing costs.
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BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE L.A. TIMES | November 16, 2003
I recently paid off the balance on a department store charge card, using a check I sent through the mail. When I got my monthly checking account statement from the bank, it listed an electronic debit for the payment amount instead of showing the check clearing. I called the bank and was informed that it honors any debit - it assumed that the merchant had my permission for the transaction. I called the store and was told that the faint print on the back of the monthly bills informed me of the new practice sometime over the summer.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 7, 2003
BROOKLYN, N.Y. - Several U.S. retailers have objected to the $3 billion debit-card settlement with MasterCard International Inc. and Visa International Inc., the two biggest credit-card companies. Lawyers representing restaurants in Pennsylvania, Florida and California were among the first to challenge parts of the settlement, including a legal fee request of $609 million for the retailers' lawyers. The settlement was reached in April, just before a trial was to have begun in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 7, 2001
For several years, I have enjoyed the convenience of a Visa debit card. At the end of the month, I know exactly what purchases I've made. Now, however, I understand that fraudulent purchases on a debit card are not covered. In fact, someone with access to my card and personal identification number could drain the account. Living on Social Security and the amount of money that goes through this account monthly, I am very worried, as the loss would be disastrous. Am I worried for no reason, or do you have suggestions as to what I should do to protect myself?
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 23, 2002
Millions of shoppers have adopted a new answer when the cashier asks, "Will that be cash or credit?" They're reaching for their wallets and pulling out a debit card. As fans see it, debit cards are more convenient than cash or check, and they can't accumulate big debts the way credit cards can. Now there's another reason to swipe a debit card. A growing number of institutions offer rewards previously associated only with credit cards, including frequent-flier miles, merchant discounts and rebates.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
New federal rules to protect consumers from being surprised by hefty overdraft fees on debit cards transactions have come a little too late for Stephanie George Hirschberg. The Ellicott City artist says she tries to leave more than enough money in her bank account to cover debit card purchases. Besides, she adds, the bank usually denies transactions when her funds are too low. But not last month. A dozen of George Hirschberg's transactions over a few days sailed through, even though she didn't have enough cash in her account.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,sun reporter | March 7, 2008
Two city police officers, including a member of the police commissioner's security detail, face criminal charges in unrelated incidents. Officer Robert Snead, a member of Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III's security detail since July, faces handgun and other charges stemming from a confrontation with the husband of his former girlfriend. Another officer, Lakisha Davis, a six year veteran, has been charged with going on an $8,000 spending spree using a debit card that had been erroneously issued.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 27, 2012
A Bulgarian citizen, who was involved in an international conspiracy to skim debit and credit card information from bank and other ATMs, including at least one in Bel Air early last year, was sentenced to 32 months in federal prison by a judge in Baltimore Federal District Court Friday. In addition to receiving a prison term, Hristo Georgive Kostov, 29, who had been living in Howard County, was also sentenced to two years of supervised release by U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
It's no mistake that the bank-card swipe device at Wal-Mart Stores Inc. asks customers first to enter their secret personal identification number - their PIN - to begin a debit purchase. Nor is it a coincidence that Wachovia Corp., the nation's fourth-largest bank, recently launched a promotion for customers to earn discounts on various products purchased with one of the bank's "check cards," provided that they sign for their purchases rather than use a PIN. Although many shoppers don't realize it, they are in the middle of an invisible tug of war between credit-card companies and major retailers in an increasingly cashless society.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | April 25, 2002
Baltimore City Southern District Theft: After stealing a debit card from a resident of Herndon Court on Tuesday, the thief removed more than $400 from the victim's bank account through an automated teller machine in the 3000 block of S. Hanover St.
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