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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Customers who dined at P.F. Chang's China Bistro at the Inner Harbor during two months this spring may be victims of debit and credit card data theft, the Scottsdale-based chain warned Monday in an announcement of a widespread security breach at 33 U.S. locations. PF. Chang's was alerted to a possible breach on June 10 by the U.S. Secret Service and launched a still-ongoing investigation. The company said it had the problem contained by the next day and has been processing credit and debit cards securely since June 11. Chang's said its card processing system was breached.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Customers who dined at P.F. Chang's China Bistro at the Inner Harbor during two months this spring may be victims of debit and credit card data theft, the Scottsdale-based chain warned Monday in an announcement of a widespread security breach at 33 U.S. locations. PF. Chang's was alerted to a possible breach on June 10 by the U.S. Secret Service and launched a still-ongoing investigation. The company said it had the problem contained by the next day and has been processing credit and debit cards securely since June 11. Chang's said its card processing system was breached.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2010
Holly Rhodes of Baltimore says she's willing to pay a fee if she overdraws her checking account, something she acknowledges happens a little too frequently. But the 25-year-old complains that her bank processes her checks and debit card transactions in a way that's designed to wring out even more overdraft fees from her. PNC Bank clears transactions from highest to lowest — not in the order they occurred — so her account empties faster and more penalties are incurred. At $36 a pop, overdrafts can add up quickly.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Students across the country are headed back to college, and millions of them will get financial aid disbursed on a debit card. The cards are convenient and save money for the schools. But these debit cards can be expensive for students, who could see their financial aid eaten up by fees. This month, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. announced it had ordered the nation's largest player in campus debit cards — Higher One — to return about $11 million to roughly 60,000 students related to fees the company charged for insufficient funds.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,dan.thanh.dang@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
All parents want to protect their children from harm and failure. That was Alan Zulich's first instinct when his 24-year-old daughter, Elizabeth, ran into a mysterious financial mishap. It came after a three-day stay at the Fenwick Inn in Ocean City left her with a $715.38 deficit in her checking account. Upon being told by hotel staff that the problem stemmed from a $700-plus security hold placed on her debit card account for the room, Zulich dashed off a sharply worded letter in June to the hotel's general manager to complain.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | March 25, 2008
To improve retirement savings, we should be making it harder for workers to get their hands on 401(k) money -- not easier. Certainly not as easy as going to the ATM machine. But that's exactly what the 401(k) debit card by Reserve Solutions does. The ReservePlus card allows you -- with the 401(k) plan's approval, of course -- to tap retirement money by using the card at an ATM or to make purchases at merchants that accept Visa cards. This seems like a new way to sacrifice your future.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | November 27, 2005
This holiday season, about one-third of shoppers are expected to use a debit card for purchases rather than a credit card in an effort to keep spending in check. It would mark the second year in a row that debit cards have significantly pulled ahead of credit cards as the payment of preference around the holidays, according to a recent survey by the National Retail Federation. The use of credit cards - the choice of about 28 percent of shoppers - has been dropping and this year is expected to fall behind cash.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn | January 9, 2000
ONE NICE THING about debit cards is that they're usually free. Most banks don't charge you fees for using them. And you don't waste money on interest payments, because you can't use debit cards to run up debt. But will these cards stay free? A handful of banks and merchants are starting to charge fees when the card is used. A debit card looks like a credit card. It usually carries a MasterCard or Visa logo and is accepted wherever those credit cards are used. Typically, your debit card is your ATM card, too. But when you use a debit card to make a purchase, you're not buying on credit.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN | August 7, 1995
NEW YORK -- Last Christmas, Marcie Knapik Sanders of Charlton, Mass., got a plastic card in the mail that she thought was a MasterCard. It came unsolicited from her new bank, the Shawmut. If she spent enough money with it, she could win a Jeep Cherokee. So she put her other card away and bought Christmas presents with the new one.Big mistake. Although it looked like a credit card, felt like a credit card and acted like a credit card in the stores, it wasn't one. It was a debit card and there's a world of difference.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | September 24, 1993
Life got a little easier for Darrell Davidson when he found a way to shop, dine or pay for just about anything without carrying cash, checks or credit cards. The Mount Washington resident now carries an "electronic check."When Mr. Davidson makes a purchase, NationsBank authorizes the merchant to withdraw the amount directly from his checking account. He doesn't have to carry checks or cash, and no interest mounts on his credit card.Mr. Davidson carries a debit card, and such cards have been around in one form or another since the first automatic teller machine card was issued.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Tens of thousands of people in Baltimore who use food stamps to buy groceries can now do their shopping at the Baltimore Farmers' Market and Bazaar under the Jones Falls Expressway, thanks to a new token system launched Sunday. Customers who don't have cash at the fresh-produce market off East Saratoga Street can now swipe their debit cards to make purchases as well. At a public opening of the market's new welcome center, where debit and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | June 4, 2012
One more reason why the Consumer Financial Protection Bureauneeds to look at prepaid debit cards: College students are finding their scarce dollars eaten up by fees on the cards, which many schools are using for student IDs and to disburse financial aid, according to a new study by U.S. Public Interest Research Group. PIRG says information about the contracts between colleges and the financial institutions that provide the cards to students isn't widely available, but at least one school struck a deal worth millions to the college.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Prepaid debit cards are everywhere these days — and so are their fees. The cards allow you to load cash onto them and are accepted by businesses just like other types of plastic. But you might have to pay a fee to activate the card, make ATM withdrawals, check your balance, talk to customer service or reload money onto the card. Monthly fees can be as high as $14.95, and you could be dinged up to $5.95 if you haven't used the card in a while. "This is sort of a gift card with lots of fees," says Ruth Susswein, a spokeswoman with Consumer Action, which recently published a survey on prepaid card fees.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 27, 2012
A Bulgarian citizen, who was involved in an international conspiracy to skim debit and credit card information from bank and other ATMs, including at least one in Bel Air early last year, was sentenced to 32 months in federal prison by a judge in Baltimore Federal District Court Friday. In addition to receiving a prison term, Hristo Georgive Kostov, 29, who had been living in Howard County, was also sentenced to two years of supervised release by U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
A Bulgarian man living in Howard County was sentenced to more than six years in prison Friday for his part in an debit card skimming scheme that stole more than $400,000 from at least 526 people, prosecutors said. Ivo Svetozarov Damyanov, 32, was given 75 months in prison followed by three years of supervised release for conspiracy to obtain ATM card account and personal identification numbers, Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office said in a statement. For at least two years, from Feb. 2009 though Feb. 2011, Damyanov and his conspirators placed "skimmers" into the card-reading slots of ATMs throughout Maryland, the statement said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Facing a consumer backlash and an online revolt, Bank of America said Tuesday that it won't adopt a $5 monthly debit card fee next year after all. The move - which came after some banks had backed away from similar fees - is seen as a major victory for consumers, who stood together against what they saw as an unfair fee to access their own money. "A lot of people do petitions," said Catherine Anderson, 30, a Bank of America customer in Baltimore. "Sometimes they work; sometimes they don't.
BUSINESS
By Harriet Johnson Brackey and Harriet Johnson Brackey,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | July 29, 2007
Have we all lost the ability to balance our checkbooks? In just two years, the amount of overdraft fees collected by the largest banks has increased by 70 percent, according to a recent study by the Center for Responsible Lending. It's a big change from the past. There was a time when debit cards would be turned down if you did not have enough money in your account to cover a transaction. But today's debit cards never say, "No" and are a great deal for the bank. Debit-card transactions are the leading cause of overdrafts, according to the center.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1996
An Ellicott City businessman and three employees have been charged with stealing more than 19,000 copies of public records from the Howard Circuit Court clerk's office by illegally using a state-owned debit card.Police say Melvin Gary Rybczynski, 50, who researches land titles from his office on Court Avenue, and his employees used the card without authorization for six months. Officials said they ran up $4,800 in costs -- 25 cents a copy -- that they never paid.According to a charging document, the card was issued to a clerk's office supervisor whose wife is an employee of Mr. Rybczynski's.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | November 1, 2011
Regions Bank says it will rescind it's monthly debit card feed starting today “in response to feedback from customers.” I can imagine the feedback. The Alabama-based bank said it will refund the $4 monthly fee to customers' accounts on Friday. Consumers have been outraged by banks charging a monthly debit card fee ever since the news late last month that Bank of America would introduce a $5 per month fee next year. Banks have been backpedaling ever since.
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