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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
Maryland's three Democratic candidates for attorney general are likely to debate how to enforce environmental laws, fight high-tech crime and crack down on home foreclosures at their first debate Monday night in a race that will likely determine who will be the state's top lawyer. State Sen. Brian E. Frosh, Del. Jon S. Cardin and Del. Aisha Braveboy are seeking the Democratic nomination in a race that party's nominee has won in every election for almost a century. The winner of this year's June 24 primary will face Jeffrey N. Pritzker, a Towson lawyer who would be the first Republican elected to the office since 1919, and Leo Wayne Dymowski, a Libertarian.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The two opponents of Del. Jon S. Cardin in his race for the Democratic nomination for attorney general chastised him during a debate Monday night for skipping almost 75 percent of his committee votes this year. State Sen. Brian E. Frosh of Montgomery County and Del. Aisha Braveboy of Prince George's County said there was no excuse for missing so many voting sessions, where decisions are made on which bills die and which advance to a floor vote. "If you don't show up in Annapolis, if you don't vote, you don't count," Frosh said during the first debate of the attorney general's race, held at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
If dolphins depart the National Aquarium, officials are contemplating what to do with the 1.2 million-gallon pool where the marine mammals have been on display for more than two decades. Among the possibilities: creating an underwater forest with swaying kelp seaweed stalks, leopard sharks and wolf eels, or a habitat that emulates the southern Pacific Ocean, where groupers and other marine life inhabit rusting fighter airplanes and other war wreckage. The fate of the $35 million Marine Mammal Pavilion, which opened in 1990 and takes up one-third of the aquarium's footprint, is one of many deliberations the National Aquarium has undertaken.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The next televised debate in the governor's race likely will feature two candidates and an empty lectern. Baltimore Fox affiliate WBFF-TV announced "finalized" debate plans Monday that include only two of the top three Democrats in the race: Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur. The pair are scheduled to face off next Tuesday without the candidate leading the polls, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, who has declined to participate. Brown's campaign consistently has told debate organizers the lieutenant governor has no plans to attend, but the Sinclair-owned Fox affiliate plans to leave an empty lectern on the stage in his place.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
The big question facing Baltimore's National Aquarium - whether to keep Atlantic bottlenose dolphins in the amphitheater pool or release them to an ocean-side sanctuary - is the latest twist in the decades-long evolution of American zoos and aquatic attractions from circus-like menageries to portals into the natural environment. Much of the change is driven by emerging scientific evidence that shows the advanced intellect of marine mammals compared with species such as sharks and puffins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
WBFF-TV, the Sinclair-owned Fox affiliate in Baltimore, will host a Democratic gubernatorial debate May 27, the station said Friday. Anchor Jennifer Gilbert will moderate the debate between Attorney General Douglas Gansler and Delegate Heather Mizeur. Lt. Governor Anthony Brown has said he will not participate in the Baltimore TV debate. Here's the release from WBFF: BALTIMORE, MD (May 16, 2014) - WBFF FOX45 is pleased to announce that it has finalized plans to host a political debate between the Democratic candidates running in the 2014 Maryland gubernatorial primary election.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
When Julio Martinez crossed the U.S. border illegally more than a decade ago, his attorneys say, he was running for his life, attempting to escape the deadly and pervasive gang he joined in his native El Salvador as a 14-year-old boy. Martinez, who entered the country in 2000 and lived in Middle River for years, is now at the center of a legal question that has split federal courts and that could have significant implications for U.S. immigration...
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Anne Arundel Republican county executive candidates Laura Neuman and Steve Schuh traded barbs in a debate this week in Annapolis. Neuman, who was appointed county executive to replace John R. Leopold last year, and Schuh, a two-term state delegate, have been duking it out in the GOP primary for months. Neuman used Monday's debate to attack Schuh for his actions as a state legislator and his campaign tactics. She mentioned multiple times that Schuh voted for the state law that requires Anne Arundel and other jurisdictions to charge a stormwater remediation fee — dubbed a "rain tax" by detractors — to pay for pollution-reduction programs.
NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman, mtilghman@tribune.com | May 13, 2014
Public education - the new hybrid school board, school safety and overcrowding - dominated discussions among the three candidates for the 42nd District's state Senate seat. Just six weeks before the primary, incumbent Sen. Jim Brochin, a Democrat of Towson, Democrat Connie DeJuliis, of Glen Arm, who represented Dundalk in the House of Delegates for one term in the 1990s, and Republican Tim Robinson, a physician from Timonium, faced off at the Idlewylde Community Center. Brochin, who is seeking his fourth term, will face DeJuliis in the Democratic primary election June 24. The winner will face Robinson in the general election Nov. 4. All three candidates told the audience of about 25 that they believe these issues were better handled by county officials, but promised their support.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Christopher Doyle says he doesn't think there is anything wrong with being gay, but he also believes he can help children and others rid themselves of "unwanted same-sex attractions" through therapy sessions in a tidy suburban home in Bowie. That has made the licensed psychotherapist the target of intense criticism over the years - so much so, he says, that he closely protects the address of the International Healing Foundation, the nearly 25-year-old nonprofit he runs. "Unfortunately, we get targeted by activists," Doyle said in the home on a recent morning.
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