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NEWS
By SEAN R. TUFFNELL | August 22, 1999
DALLAS -- The American dream has always included entrepreneurs who risk everything to forge a better life for themselves and their families. America used to encourage this type of rugged individualism, but not anymore.While the United States never went as far as some of the welfare states of Europe, collectivism did infect our public policy.One example was the enactment in 1916 of the estate tax, also known as the death tax -- the tax on assets transferred from one generation to another after death.
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NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
Republican candidates for Maryland governor criticized the O'Malley administration - but rarely each other - in a tame radio debate today that touched on the state's handgun permit law and 2013 death penalty repeal. The 60-minute, morning debate was broadcast and streamed live on WBAL radio. Host Jimmy Mathis solicited questions from listeners. The four candidates -- Harford County Executive David R. Craig , Del. Ron George of Annapolis, former Ehrlich administration official Larry Hogan and Charles County business executive Charles Lollar -- spent much of the debate drawing contrasts between their respective positions and those of Gov. Martin O'Malley, who is prevented by term limits from running again.
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NEWS
By Douglas Pike | December 12, 1999
THE tax that Republicans hate the most these days is the "death tax." That's their brilliant slur for the tax on people's wealth when they die.They present it as a ghoulish indignity -- you die one day and the Internal Revenue Service takes a last, large bite. This anti-tax crusade seems to be working. Some opinion polls show that two-thirds of Americans believe the estate tax should be eliminated.Actually, this is a wonderful tax whose timing couldn't be better. What's so painful about paying a tax after you're dead?
NEWS
October 31, 2013
Much as Americans hate taxes and tax increases, there's at least one levy even the government wishes people wouldn't pay. That's the tax on cigarettes, which the government dearly wishes people would avoid. When it come to cigarettes, a tax is its way of encouraging smokers to keep their money in their pockets by quitting, and a report this week from a coalition of health advocacy groups suggests the strategy is working. According to a study released this week by the Citizens' Health Initiative, sales of cigarettes in Maryland have declined dramatically since 2008, when lawmakers raised the state tax on tobacco by a dollar.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 8, 2000
WASHINGTON - House Democrats closed ranks yesterday to sustain President Clinton's veto of legislation that would have eliminated the federal estate tax, contending that the Republican bill would help the very richest Americans at the expense of the middle class. Under pressure from the White House and their own leaders, 13 Democrats who had supported the bill in June when it passed the House switched sides yesterday to deny Republicans the two-thirds majority they needed to override the veto.
NEWS
May 30, 2000
THE FEDERAL tax levied on the estates of the nation's deceased is one step closer to its own demise. A bill eliminating the "death tax," as Republicans like to call it, by 2010 is scheduled for a House vote in June. It is one of the most vilified sections of the Internal Revenue Code. Opponents cite heart-wrenching stories of families selling off farms and businesses to satisfy the tax. As the net worth of Americans increases, the fear of this tax grows. Even some Democrats, formerly staunch opponents, are now talking about relieving the burden for all but the wealthiest individuals.
NEWS
August 20, 1999
`Death tax' hurts middle class as it erodes core valuesI was surprised to read The Sun's editorial "Death tax's exaggerated bite" (Aug. 2). It cited a seriously flawed study by Charles Davenport and Jay A. Soled as justification for opposing the elimination of the federal estate or "death" tax.But that study relied chiefly on questionable tax and economic data supplied by the federal government -- information obtained from an administration that has opposed...
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | April 12, 2001
ATLANTA - The move by House Republicans to bump the administration's repeal of the estate tax to 2011 shifts President Bush's tax-cut program from a mere political flimflam into outright fraud. The point of the dodge is to keep the Bush tax cut over 10 years within the $1.6 trillion limit the president set. (The real cost to the Treasury, for a variety of reasons including increased federal interest payments, would be between $2.2 trillion and $2.5 trillion, but that's another scam.) By booting the estate tax repeal ahead, beyond the 10-year line, the short-term costs of the tax cut are lowered from the $662 billion the Joint Tax Committee had estimated to $186 billion.
NEWS
January 21, 2012
Your editorial "Death and farming" (Jan. 17) claims that there are no reliable numbers about farms subjected to estate taxes. Here's one: 22,000. According to a 2010 American Family Business Foundation study by economist Adam Davies, that is the number of family farms that are currently susceptible to the nightmare of getting taxed upon a death in the family. To add to this unfortunate dilemma, Maryland is one of just 20 states that discourage successful family businesses and farms by piling their own estate tax on top of an already burdensome federal estate tax. Maryland's estate tax forces family farmers to pump working capital that could be used to pay employees, upgrade machinery and buy new equipment into life insurance and estate plans to protect their property from confiscation.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
I was born in Baltimore County, raised in Prince George's County, attended public schools in Prince George's, matriculated from the University of Maryland College Park, and received an MBA from Mount Saint Mary's College. I have worked my entire career, approaching 30 years, within the state, dutifully paying my share of state income and personal property taxes. And while some would tell me I am in the "1 percent," I know that I am only in that rarefied air as long as I am working.
NEWS
October 12, 2012
The recent House oversight hearing showed, among other things, that notwithstanding White House assertions to the contrary for almost two weeks, there was no public demonstration whatsoever outside the Benghazi Consulate on the night of the Sept. 11 attack and that within 24 hours of the attack, it was recognized by some in the White House to have been a terrorist inspired and executed attack ("Testimony: Calls for aid were denied," Oct. 11). It was also revealed at the hearing that the U.S. State Department denied repeated requests to improve the security of our diplomatic stations in Libya.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
I was born in Baltimore County, raised in Prince George's County, attended public schools in Prince George's, matriculated from the University of Maryland College Park, and received an MBA from Mount Saint Mary's College. I have worked my entire career, approaching 30 years, within the state, dutifully paying my share of state income and personal property taxes. And while some would tell me I am in the "1 percent," I know that I am only in that rarefied air as long as I am working.
NEWS
January 21, 2012
Your editorial "Death and farming" (Jan. 17) claims that there are no reliable numbers about farms subjected to estate taxes. Here's one: 22,000. According to a 2010 American Family Business Foundation study by economist Adam Davies, that is the number of family farms that are currently susceptible to the nightmare of getting taxed upon a death in the family. To add to this unfortunate dilemma, Maryland is one of just 20 states that discourage successful family businesses and farms by piling their own estate tax on top of an already burdensome federal estate tax. Maryland's estate tax forces family farmers to pump working capital that could be used to pay employees, upgrade machinery and buy new equipment into life insurance and estate plans to protect their property from confiscation.
NEWS
January 25, 2011
State of the Union addresses often have an unfortunate kitchen sink quality, in which presidents seek to pack as many disparate policy ideas as possible into their allotted hour before Congress and the nation in hopes of ticking the boxes important to every constituency. For the most part, President Obama admirably avoided that, speaking past the political tit-for-tat and focusing on the overarching question of our times: How will America compete and win an increasingly global economy?
BUSINESS
February 20, 2007
Editor's note: Every Tuesday through the end of tax season, The Sun will run an edited transcript of Baltimoresun.com's weekly tax-advice column featuring three experts from the Hunt Valley accounting firm SC&H Group. My mother died in March 2006, and I was her personal representative. I filed her 2005 individual tax forms in April 2006 and marked them deceased taxpayer. Her estate was closed in the same year, and a Form 1041 was filed. I have recently received 1099 forms for pension payments, interest and dividends for 2006.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 23, 2006
The federal government is moving to eliminate the jobs of nearly half of the lawyers at the Internal Revenue Service who audit tax returns of some of the wealthiest Americans, specifically those who are subject to gift and estate taxes when they transfer parts of their fortunes to their children and others. The administration plans to cut the jobs of 157 of the agency's 345 estate tax lawyers, plus 17 support personnel, in less than 70 days. Kevin Brown, an IRS deputy commissioner, confirmed the cuts after The New York Times was given internal documents by people inside the IRS who oppose them.
NEWS
By Grover Q. Norquist | November 21, 2004
THE GOAL of tax reform is to tax income one time at one rate. Today, the federal government taxes you when you earn a dollar, when you save it, when you invest it. And if you invest it in a company, they tax the company's earnings. And if the company pays you a dividend, they tax that. And if your home or stocks appreciate in value, they tax that "capital gain." And if you are stupid enough to die, they take as much as half again. Our goal is to reduce the complexity, intrusiveness and expense of the present federal income tax structure by taxing income one time at one single rate.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
Republican candidates for Maryland governor criticized the O'Malley administration - but rarely each other - in a tame radio debate today that touched on the state's handgun permit law and 2013 death penalty repeal. The 60-minute, morning debate was broadcast and streamed live on WBAL radio. Host Jimmy Mathis solicited questions from listeners. The four candidates -- Harford County Executive David R. Craig , Del. Ron George of Annapolis, former Ehrlich administration official Larry Hogan and Charles County business executive Charles Lollar -- spent much of the debate drawing contrasts between their respective positions and those of Gov. Martin O'Malley, who is prevented by term limits from running again.
NEWS
By Grover Q. Norquist | November 21, 2004
THE GOAL of tax reform is to tax income one time at one rate. Today, the federal government taxes you when you earn a dollar, when you save it, when you invest it. And if you invest it in a company, they tax the company's earnings. And if the company pays you a dividend, they tax that. And if your home or stocks appreciate in value, they tax that "capital gain." And if you are stupid enough to die, they take as much as half again. Our goal is to reduce the complexity, intrusiveness and expense of the present federal income tax structure by taxing income one time at one single rate.
NEWS
June 24, 2002
Eliminating the estate tax is best option The middle ground of reforming the estate tax instead of repealing it sounds ideal to many people ("Death and taxes," editorial, June 13). But reality is a bit different. In fact, the costs of complying with the tax and the economic disincentives built into the tax cost the government 65 cents for each dollar collected. Even without considering these costs, estate taxes account for less than 2 percent of federal revenue. And arguments that tax cuts caused the current budget deficit and that we should not cut taxes because of the deficit simply do not hold water.
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