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By JONATHAN POWER | October 25, 1991
Stockholm--The Sunday sermon by Pope John Paul II in Salvador, Brazil, last weekend was a necessary jolt to the callous, of whom there seem to be rather too many in Brazil.Why, the pope wanted to know, are there so many small children living on the streets in Brazil? And how could a society tolerate these children being murdered by death squads in the pay of businessmen wanting to clean up their neighborhoods?In Sao Paulo, Latin America's largest metropolis, only 15 years ago you could count the number of street children on a couple of pair of hands.
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NEWS
July 16, 2014
Like so many others, I have been closely following the refugee crisis at the southern border. But instead of welcoming these poor children, who are desperate for help, many people refuse to recognize their humanity. For example, the Carroll County Board of Commissioners and Rep. Andy Harris protested the possibility that of some of the child refugees would be housed in Westminster ( "U.S. dismisses Carroll Co. as shelter site," July 13). I immediately thought of the Jewish refugees on the S.S. St. Louis who were turned away from the United States, as many of them died in concentration camps.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As recently as three years ago, American military officers in El Salvador trained a group of wealthy Salvadorans associated with right-wing death squads, State Department documents show.The training occurred at a time when the threat of Communism was receding and the Bush administration was pursuing peace settlements in Central America.The documents are the first to describe Americans as training civilians tied to political killings in El Salvador, and the first to link American support to Salvadoran death-squad activities in the 1990s.
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun reporter | June 26, 2007
Never mind that they only had four returning players and finished with a losing record. When members of the Patterson High School lacrosse team talk about their difficult spring, it always comes back to the midseason death of their captain, senior Christopher Clarke. Clarke was fatally shot after practice March 13, an innocent bystander in a street shooting near his home in the Belair-Edison neighborhood. Patterson Principal Laura Lee D'Anna, lacrosse coach Jonathan Kehl and three of Clarke's former teammates remembered him yesterday as they accepted dozens of new and barely-used lacrosse sticks and pieces of protective gear donated to the school by AT&T.
NEWS
By Juan Gonzalez and Juan Gonzalez,New York Daily News | March 18, 1992
NEW YORK -- In the days just before he was shot to death execution-style in a Queens restaurant, journalist Manuel de Dios Unanue told several people about the large manila envelope with explosive information that he was about to mail to Puerto Rico.He even showed it off -- addressed and with postage stamps affixed -- while dining with four friends the week before his death.The contents, Mr. de Dios said, would implicate anti-Castro Cuban terrorists, for the first time, with top Puerto Rican and U.S. law enforcement officials in secret death squads that operated for years on the island.
NEWS
By Solomon Moore and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 15, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Death squads continued to sweep through the Iraqi capital yesterday, leaving behind a grisly trail of at least 22 bodies, some of them handcuffed and decapitated. At least 19 people were killed in other violence throughout the country, including five U.S. soldiers whose deaths were reported yesterday. A U.S. military spokesman acknowledged that despite a major operation to combat death squads and curb sectarian violence between Shiite militia fighters and Sunni Arab insurgents in Baghdad, violence has increased.
NEWS
By BORZOU DARAGAHI AND JULIAN E. BARNES and BORZOU DARAGAHI AND JULIAN E. BARNES,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 25, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- U.S. military officials announced yesterday that they had stepped up a campaign against "death squads" operating in the capital, launching 19 raids as sectarian violence between Sunnis and Shiites left dozens dead and wounded throughout Iraq. In the western Iraqi province of Anbar, two U.S. soldiers died in combat and the mayor of the provincial capital was assassinated. Inside the heavily protected Green Zone, Saddam Hussein's half-brother presented his final defense in a trial over the fate of nearly 150 Shiite villagers who were killed by the former regime.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 18, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq --The Iraqi government removed the country's two most senior police commanders from their posts yesterday, in the first broad move against the top leadership of Iraq's unruly special police forces. The two generals had commanded Iraq's special police commandos and its public order brigade, both widely criticized as being heavily infiltrated by Shiite militias. Their removal comes at a crucial time for Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, who has fallen under intense U.S. pressure to purge Iraq's security forces of the militias and death squads that operate within their ranks.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | January 7, 1994
LONDON -- The 4-year-old United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child has failed to protect many children from widespread human rights abuses that include kidnapping, torture, rape and murder, Amnesty International said today.Children are targeted for terrifying cruelty in many of the 149 countries that signed the 1989 U.N. convention, the London-based human rights organization said.In 1993, Amnesty International recorded violations in every region of the world. "Disappearances," torture or extra-judicial executions of children were reported in 35 countries.
NEWS
June 15, 1995
The State Department can't wash its hands of the stain left by the Honduran death squad scandal. It's no surprise that the CIA is stonewalling in response to questions about the role of some of its officers in the kidnapping, torture and murder of Hondurans during the early '80s. That's still standard practice at the intelligence agency, even under new leadership. But for the State Department to shield -- and express continued confidence in -- an ambassador still on active service who connived at these atrocities is unacceptable.
NEWS
By Christian Berthelsen and Christian Berthelsen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 27, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- In an assassination attempt apparently plotted from inside the government, a bomb planted at an Iraqi ministry where one of the nation's vice presidents was making an official appearance yesterday killed five people and injured dozens, prompting questions about Iraq's ability to ensure its own security. The bombing targeted Adel Abdul-Mahdi, one of two Iraqi vice presidents and a top leader in the largest Shiite voting bloc in parliament. It was detonated as he attended a morning ceremony honoring employees of the Ministry of Labor and Municipalities.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- The toll of sectarian death-squad killings in the capital has declined sharply in recent days in the face of an imminent crackdown on organized sectarian militias, officials said yesterday. Iraqi authorities found 19 bodies of young men scattered around the capital yesterday, a sharp drop from the scores found each day several weeks ago. The reported daily body count for the last week or so has hovered around 30 or lower. The bodies of late have not shown signs of torture often associated with Shiite Muslim militias, morgue and hospital officials say. Officials cautioned that the casualty figures are preliminary and sketchy.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,Los Angeles Times | January 13, 2007
BUENOS AIRES -- The arrest of former Argentine President Isabel Peron in Spain yesterday signaled an expansion of human rights cases here beyond the former military junta to the epoch of strongman Juan Domingo Peron, father of Argentina's current ruling party. The 75-year-old former president, whose full name is Maria Estela Martinez de Peron, was arrested at her home near Madrid after a federal judge in Argentina issued a warrant for her detention, officials reported. A Spanish tribunal later ordered her conditional release pending an extradition request from Argentina.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 18, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq --The Iraqi government removed the country's two most senior police commanders from their posts yesterday, in the first broad move against the top leadership of Iraq's unruly special police forces. The two generals had commanded Iraq's special police commandos and its public order brigade, both widely criticized as being heavily infiltrated by Shiite militias. Their removal comes at a crucial time for Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, who has fallen under intense U.S. pressure to purge Iraq's security forces of the militias and death squads that operate within their ranks.
NEWS
By Solomon Moore and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 28, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Senior U.S. military officials complain that Iraq's Shiite-led government is thwarting efforts to go after Shiite death squads blamed in the killings of Sunni Arabs in neighborhoods across the capital city. The recent statements highlight rising U.S. dissatisfaction with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and an increasing willingness to exert pressure on the fledgling Iraqi government to stage military operations in Baghdad neighborhoods like Sadr City, a stronghold for the Mahdi Army, the militia loyal to anti-U.
NEWS
By Louise Roug | September 21, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- The United Nations issued a somber report on civilian deaths in Iraq, even as at least 71 people were killed or found slain yesterday in the country. Meanwhile, a top U.S. military spokesman said attacks against U.S. troops have recently increased, as have killings by death squads that target civilians. He also said that U.S. commanders expect violence to escalate further during the holy month of Ramadan, which begins this weekend. The United Nations reported yesterday that 3,009 people were killed in Iraq during August, a slight decrease from July's toll of 3,590.
NEWS
By Solomon Moore and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 28, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Senior U.S. military officials complain that Iraq's Shiite-led government is thwarting efforts to go after Shiite death squads blamed in the killings of Sunni Arabs in neighborhoods across the capital city. The recent statements highlight rising U.S. dissatisfaction with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and an increasing willingness to exert pressure on the fledgling Iraqi government to stage military operations in Baghdad neighborhoods like Sadr City, a stronghold for the Mahdi Army, the militia loyal to anti-U.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,Los Angeles Times | January 13, 2007
BUENOS AIRES -- The arrest of former Argentine President Isabel Peron in Spain yesterday signaled an expansion of human rights cases here beyond the former military junta to the epoch of strongman Juan Domingo Peron, father of Argentina's current ruling party. The 75-year-old former president, whose full name is Maria Estela Martinez de Peron, was arrested at her home near Madrid after a federal judge in Argentina issued a warrant for her detention, officials reported. A Spanish tribunal later ordered her conditional release pending an extradition request from Argentina.
NEWS
By Solomon Moore and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 15, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Death squads continued to sweep through the Iraqi capital yesterday, leaving behind a grisly trail of at least 22 bodies, some of them handcuffed and decapitated. At least 19 people were killed in other violence throughout the country, including five U.S. soldiers whose deaths were reported yesterday. A U.S. military spokesman acknowledged that despite a major operation to combat death squads and curb sectarian violence between Shiite militia fighters and Sunni Arab insurgents in Baghdad, violence has increased.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 14, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Amid rising political tensions over a proposal to carve Iraq into separate federal regions, nearly 90 people were reported killed yesterday in an explosion of violence across Baghdad that cast doubt on U.S. claims that the city is on its way to being pacified. The toll included dozens of corpses found dumped around various Baghdad neighborhoods and the deaths of at least 22 people in a series of bombings and mortar attacks targeting security forces and government institutions.
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