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Death Row Records

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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 30, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- Death Row Records, the most successful rap label in the country since its founding in 1992, is under investigation by the federal government, which is trying to determine whether Death Row is being run as a criminal enterprise.Sources said that authorities suspect the rap label is tied somehow to organized crime in New York and Chicago.It is increasingly apparent that the company faces even more serious problems than the recent jailing of company founder and owner Marion "Suge" Knight.
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By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2002
HOLLYWOOD - The party at the Playboy Mansion was over hours earlier, and as the clock ticked toward 4 a.m., Marion "Suge" Knight was back in his darkened office and puffing on a Cuban cigar. Over his shoulder, the framed platinum albums glinted like chrome rims in a low fog. It was then, as happens with the rap music mogul, that the topic turned to murder. "I'm a product of the inner city, and if you're from off the block, more than likely, you're going to go in a violent way or spend your life in prison," he said in a near whisper.
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FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2002
HOLLYWOOD - The party at the Playboy Mansion was over hours earlier, and as the clock ticked toward 4 a.m., Marion "Suge" Knight was back in his darkened office and puffing on a Cuban cigar. Over his shoulder, the framed platinum albums glinted like chrome rims in a low fog. It was then, as happens with the rap music mogul, that the topic turned to murder. "I'm a product of the inner city, and if you're from off the block, more than likely, you're going to go in a violent way or spend your life in prison," he said in a near whisper.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 30, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- Death Row Records, the most successful rap label in the country since its founding in 1992, is under investigation by the federal government, which is trying to determine whether Death Row is being run as a criminal enterprise.Sources said that authorities suspect the rap label is tied somehow to organized crime in New York and Chicago.It is increasingly apparent that the company faces even more serious problems than the recent jailing of company founder and owner Marion "Suge" Knight.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 12, 1995
BOSTON -- If I have a tiny regret about the decision of the judge to ban cameras from his courtroom, it's that the rap star's fans won't get a chance to see Snoop Doggy Dogg in his civvies.There are no bandannas, no baggy pants, no tough-guy looks on the man being tried along with his bodyguard for murder. This is a good Doggy, transformed from pit bull to domestic pet.In the hallways of the L.A. courthouse he is seen, in conservative jacket and slacks, buying a statue of Jesus and Mary. His supporters tell reporters that the Dogg they know visits hospitals to sit and stay with sick children.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 21, 1996
Originally, gangsta rap was all about attitude. It was about acting tough and living large, playing off ghetto stereotypes to come on like the baddest mothers ever to walk into a recording studio.Sure, some gangsta rappers originally were gangbangers. Eric "Eazy-E" Wright admitted to having pimped and dealt drugs before turning to the music business, and Ice-T has alluded to even darker doings during his gang period. But gang life wasn't a part of their rap career; it was just an image, and an attractive one at that.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1997
There's the perpetual steady income, the big library and that enviable personal security force, but the life of an ex-president is not always a skip through the Rose Garden.You need a gig.Gerald Ford shills for corporate clients. Jimmy Carter builds houses and solves the world's problems. And George Bush does -- well, nothing, it seems.Until now.Now we know that beneath that Yale-educated preppie exterior beats the risk-taking heart of Evel Knievel!Setting new standards for ex-presidential derring-do, the 72-year-old Bush flung himself out of an airplane Tuesday and parachuted 12,500 feet, fulfilling a promise he had made to himself during World War II.But why stop there, Mr. Ex-President?
NEWS
March 17, 1997
THE SLAYING of Christopher Wallace, the rap music star known as Biggie Smalls or the Notorious B.I.G., has record stores everywhere increasing orders for his new album. Mr. Wallace was killed by a drive-by gunman a week ago in Los Angeles. Given the similarity of his death to his song lyrics, it is expected that the new CD with the eerily prescient title, "Life after death," will eclipse his 1994 million-seller, "Ready to die."And that is the shame of it. Even as rap music fans lament the death of Mr. Wallace and plead for the violence associated with "gangsta rap" to end, it is clear that his death will, for a time, reinvigorate the genre's popularity.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 7, 2002
Tupac Shakur, a product of New York and Baltimore streets who was once the world's most famous rap star, has been dead six years, and still his murder remains officially unsolved. But a yearlong investigation by the Los Angeles Times suggests Shakur was killed by members of a California gang, just hours after the rapper attacked one of their own, in a hit paid for by Shakur's rival, Notorious B.I.G. Investigators at the Times uncovered evidence that the shooting was carried out by a Compton, Calif.
FEATURES
By Renee Graham and Renee Graham,BOSTON GLOBE | November 30, 1997
Bulletproof undies, anyone?Hey, snicker if you want, but in the wake of the murders of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G., more and more hip-hop stars are sporting customized bulletproof street gear, Julie Taraska reports in the December issue of Spin.For prices ranging from $300 to $13,000, rap stars are ordering everything from sneakers to leather jackets to mink coats -- even bras -- lined with Kevlar, a lightweight fabric that can stop a slug from a .357 Magnum. It's such a booming business there are now shops that exclusively sell the latest Kevlar fashions, such as Darryl Barnes' New Jersey-based Urban Body Armor.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 12, 1995
BOSTON -- If I have a tiny regret about the decision of the judge to ban cameras from his courtroom, it's that the rap star's fans won't get a chance to see Snoop Doggy Dogg in his civvies.There are no bandannas, no baggy pants, no tough-guy looks on the man being tried along with his bodyguard for murder. This is a good Doggy, transformed from pit bull to domestic pet.In the hallways of the L.A. courthouse he is seen, in conservative jacket and slacks, buying a statue of Jesus and Mary. His supporters tell reporters that the Dogg they know visits hospitals to sit and stay with sick children.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 12, 1997
The song "Another One Bites the Dust" should become the anthem of the hip-hop world.On Sunday morning, rapper Biggie Smalls/Notorious B.I.G./Christopher Wallace died in a hail of bullets in Los Angeles. He was the victim of a drive-by shooting, getting it much the same way his archrival Tupac Shakur got it in Las Vegas six months earlier.All day Sunday and most of Monday, disc jockeys and callers to hip-hop radio stations in Baltimore and Washington bemoaned Wallace's fate. Once again there were pleas to "stop the violence."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 11, 2005
THE TWO seemingly unrelated events occurring so closely together is one of those quirks of cosmic timing. About two weeks ago, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the case of two reporters who had been ordered by a federal district judge to reveal their anonymous sources. One of those reporters, Judith Miller of The New York Times, went to jail last week rather than reveal the name of her source. The week Miller went to jail, an anonymous source contacted not the news media, but two lawyers for the family of Christopher Wallace and told them the Los Angeles Police Department was withholding information in a lawsuit.
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