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Death Penalty

NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
With a productive General Assembly session behind him, Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday that he will use the second half of the year to consider whether to run for the White House. "I need to be spending a lot more energy and time giving serious consideration and preparation to what - if anything - I might have to offer should I decide to run for president in 2016," O'Malley said during a wide-ranging interview with editors of The Baltimore Sun. O'Malley has typically demurred from answering questions about his potential candidacy, though it has been the subject of news articles and rampant political speculation both in and outside of Maryland.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Sen. Edward R. Reilly, the No. 2 Republican in the Senate, announced Tuesday that he will seek re-election in his Anne Arundel County district. Reilly, 63, is a former Anne Arundel County councilman who was appointed to the 33rd District Senate seat in 2009 and elected in 2010. He is a consistent conservative whose pro-life views led him to cast one of two Republican votes in favor of repeal of the death penalty. A Crofton resident, Reilly also holds a jobs as a Nationwide Insurance representative.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
This time last year, the Maryland General Assembly was mired in anger and confusion. The House and Senate were feuding over taxes and casino gambling. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch were butting heads. Lawmakers were heading into the final day without even having passed the budget - the one task with which they are charged in the state constitution. It took two special sessions to clean up the mess. This year, legislators will begin the session's final day Monday having already passed an array of landmark legislation - repealing Maryland's death penalty, adopting one of the nation's toughest gun laws, raising the gas tax for the first time in two decades and signing off on a $1 billion plan to rebuild Baltimore's crumbling schools.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
While Connecticut's governor wasted no time signing that state's sweeping gun control bill into law the day it was passed on Thursday, Maryland's governor plans to abide by tradition and wait.  Gov. Martin O'Malley's spokeswoman Raquel Gillory said Friday that the governor will sign Maryland's gun bill after the General Assembly adjourns on Monday.   The legislature on Thursday passed the bill banning the sale of assault-style rifles, capping magazines to 10 bullets and requiring fingerprints and a license to buy a handgun, among other provisions.
NEWS
March 28, 2013
As a strong proponent of abolishing Maryland's death penalty, I was pleased to learn that the General Assembly recently voted to eliminate the practice ("Reason over revenge, at long last," March 17). I oppose the death penalty because it is an inhumane act that serves no purpose and because it has led to wrongly convicted individuals being sentenced to death. I encourage skeptics to read the compelling story of Kirk Bloodsworth, a Marylander on death row who became the first inmate in the nation ever to be exonerated by DNA evidence.
NEWS
March 23, 2013
Outside observers must wonder what goes on in our state legislature. On one hand, the majority restricts citizens' ability to defend themselves against multiple armed assailants, thus implying the executive branch's competence to protect us. On the other hand, the same majority eliminates capital punishment, thus implying the incompetence of the judicial branch to arrive at accurate verdicts. Perhaps now victims of multiple armed assailants can mount a class action lawsuit against the legislators who voted to give the advantage in firepower to criminals.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
I find Gov. Martin. O'Malley's stand on executions confusing. On the one hand, he stays that because of his Catholic upbringing the death penalty gives him pause on moral grounds, even for those convicted of heinous and brutal crimes. On the other hand, he wants to regulate weapons that would allow people to protect themselves from the very criminals he has a moral objection to executing. That I don't understand. But the biggest question is this: Executing a violent, murderous criminal is morally wrong, but executing an unborn child is OK. Does anyone else see the contradiction?
NEWS
March 20, 2013
As expected, the Maryland General Assembly voted to abolish capital punishment ("Ending executions," March 19). Leftism is the most dynamic and vibrant religion in the West today. In all areas of life, from morals to education, economics and art, it is replacing the traditional American Judeo-Christian value system. The Leftist ideology says it is elevated, just, compassionate and kind to allow all murderers to retain their most precious possession, their life. Hence, they think they are kind and just to the next group of murdered kindergartners, their families and friends, when the savage murderer sits and has lunch in prison.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 19, 2013
The Maryland legislature recently voted to abolish capital punishment in the state, making Maryland the sixth state in the last six years to eliminate the death penalty. The primary argument for repealing the law is that our justice system is imperfect and it's possible an innocent person could be condemned. Indeed, anti-death penalty activists presented Kirk Bloodsworth, a former death-row inmate, convicted of the 1984 rape and murder of a 9-year-old girl. His conviction was overturned on appeal after the court found the prosecution had withheld exculpatory evidence from the defense.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
Having won approval in both chambers of Maryland's General Assembly, a landmark bill to abolish the state's death penalty awaits only Gov. Martin O'Malley's signature before becoming law. It is a tremendous political and moral victory for Mr. O'Malley, a long-time opponent of capital punishment who campaigned for a repeal during his first term only to come up short. That leaves only one major item of unfinished business on his agenda regarding the issue: Commuting the sentences of the five men currently on Maryland's death row to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.
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