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NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | January 30, 2014
The O'Malley administration made it a priority to protect the rights of those who have committed heinous crimes, been judged by a jury of their peers and sentenced to the ultimate punishment that can be levied against them. Why is protecting those who have been convicted and judged a higher priority than those who have yet to even be born? Last week during his final State of the State Address, Gov. Martin O'Malley made an interesting comment. He said: "Along the way, we have come together, time and again, to protect the dignity of every Marylander.
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NEWS
January 24, 2014
Having read Dan Rodricks ' column on one of the prime motives for homicides in Baltimore ("The insanity of Baltimore's 'disrespect' killings," Jan. 19), I think I may have an answer. The penalty for such a heinous crime is currently incarceration for as long a period as the law provides. It does not appear to be enough of a deterrent, however. The death penalty might be. It bothers me not at all if the killers suffer. Did they care if their victims suffered? Every time I listen to the news or read the paper there is yet another story of killings in our city.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
There are various opinions about Edward Snowden, and I feel a need to add mine to the mix ("Snowden has more U.S.-Israel secrets to expose: Greenwald," Jan. 6). Mr. Snowden has violated U.S. laws and needs to be punished, the question is how - death penalty or imprisonment - and if the latter, for how long? To make the public aware of unclassified information makes him a whistle blower, but to publicize classified information makes him a spy. And then to run and hide in Russia shows that he was completely aware of the damage he has done to aspects of our national security.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Kweisi Mfume was a Baltimore city councilman when he received what would be the first of many words of wisdom from Nelson Mandela. "Do not give up," Mfume said Mandela wrote him from prison, where he had somehow read about the councilman's efforts in the 1980s to get the city to divest from companies that did business with the apartheid government of South Africa. The two had never met, although Mfume had been agitating for his release since his student days at Morgan State University.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
Jury selection is scheduled to begin Monday in the trial of a White Marsh woman charged with ordering the death of her husband at a Towson gas station three years ago. Karla Porter, 51, could be sentenced to life without the possibility of parole if she is convicted. She had been the only defendant in Baltimore County facing the possibility of execution - but that option is gone with the state's repeal of capital punishment this year. Porter and her husband, 49-year-old William "Ray" Porter, owned the Hess gas station on Joppa Road.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
The Sun's recent editorial regarding the acquittal of George Zimmerman ("No justice," July 16) ranks up there with the one years ago where you railed on about the problem with the death penalty without once mentioning a victim or victim's family. Anyone with common sense knows that the state had no case (this is why the district attorney did not indict and why the special prosecutor assigned did not go to the grand jury). The state held back evidence and had the judge on its side.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown picked up an attractive addition to his glory wall Monday as he collected a leadership award from the national NAACP at its gathering in Orlando for his efforts at repealing the death penalty in Maryland. Brown played a supporting role in Gov. Martin O'Malley's succesful effort to aboiish capital punishment -- a drive the governor undertook under the persistent urging of NAACP national President Benjamin Jealous. Jealous pointedly noted that Brown is attempting to become the first black governor of a state south of the Mason-Dixon Line since Virginia's L. Douglas Wilder was elected in 1989.  Brown praised the NAACP's efforts to end executions in the United States, calling the death penalty unfair, immoral and racially biased.
NEWS
July 15, 2013
Where do I begin? The Maryland Court of Appeals has ruled that the state's mandatory five-year, no parole sentence for gun possession by certain convicted felons cannot stand ("Court voids gun penalty," July 12). As the article noted, "The Court of Appeals ruling in a Baltimore case erased a defendant's mandatory sentence and ordered him resentenced under a more lenient provision of the law. " Isn't it ironic that the case involves Baltimore, a city that is under siege, a city in which runs the blood of both the criminal and the innocent in its streets?
NEWS
July 15, 2013
Look at all the shooting and killing after the death penalty was repealed. I believe this was a bad time to do this. As for doubts about whether we execute the innocent, we could simply require that anyone who gets this penalty have a DNA test so we know they are 100 percent guilty of the crime. Gerald Yamin, Pikesville
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Forty people have been shot in Baltimore City, 16 fatally, within the span of 10 days - and summer is just beginning ("Deadly summer," June 30). Maybe it is just me, but doesn't it seem that the shootings have escalated since the death penalty was abolished? The criminals have nothing to be afraid of anymore. If those committing these crimes die, oh well. If those committing these crimes get caught and live, what do they have to look forward to? They receive three meals a day, medical and dental care and a roof over their heads, all free.
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