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NEWS
February 19, 2013
The last sentence of the recent article regarding the death penalty repeal ("Lori, O'Malley, others ask death penalty's end," Feb. 15) quotes Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller on why the measure is structured as an appropriations bill. "It's a subterfuge to avoid petitioning it to referendum," Mr. Miller says. No doubt the Senate president sees no wrong in that. He is just practicing what President Barack Obama did for the Affordable Care Act by using the reconciliation process and buying senators' votes with handouts like the "Cornhusker Kickback.
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NEWS
March 20, 2011
It's time for death penalty to receive an up or down vote in the Maryland General Assembly. I must strongly differ with Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller who this week declared there to be "no sentiment in the Senate" ("Death penalty repeal unlikely this year," March 16) for the 2011 repeal bill. The Senate bill has 21 co-sponsors this year (24 votes are required to pass), up from 16 two years ago. Meanwhile, the bill has 61 co-sponsors in the House. Illinois just repealed the death penalty.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
A Montgomery County senator whose vote death penalty opponents had hoped to sway this year said Friday that he is firmly committed to keeping capital punishment on the books. Sen. Rob Garagiola, a Democrat, said his position has not changed since 2009, when he supported a compromise that narrowed the circumstances in which the death penalty could be applied but fell short of full repeal. Garagiola is the lone senator from Montgomery County who supports retention of the death penalty.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | December 13, 2012
Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori asked the governor to push a death penalty repeal in the legislative session that starts in January, offering his support in a letter that was hand delivered to the state house this morning. "I urge you to again make repealing the death penalty a priority for your legislative goals this year," wrote Lori, who is currently in Rome. Gov. Martin O'Malley, a Democrat, tried in 2009 to end executions in Maryland, but fell short in the Senate. Instead the legislature adopted a compromise that requires DNA evidence or a taped confession before capital punishment is sought.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
As a mother who lost a son to murder, my heart goes out to the family of Sarah Haley Foxwell, who was killed in December 2009. I am sure it is a relief for them that Sarah's murderer pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. ("Convicted sex offender pleads guilty in killing of 11-year-old," March 30.) Having the legal case finally resolved allows the family to focus on healing. Contrast this outcome to what would have happened if prosecutors had continued to pursue a death sentence.
NEWS
February 14, 2011
The talk of possibly eliminating the death penalty in the state of Maryland shows that justice is simply a joke and once again the criminals will be emboldened to rape, maim and kill knowing they get to spend the rest of their lives not having to worry about being executed for the horrors of the crimes they committed ( "Death penalty moratorium leaves survivors, convicts in limbo," Feb. 13). Families of victims will get no closure as well as no justice knowing this sad fact. A life snuffed out and taxpayers having to foot the bill for the criminals who may live 20 to 60 years in prison is simply too much to bear!
NEWS
February 28, 2011
The death penalty can never be abolished ( "Death penalty's cruel toll on the victims," Feb. 27). Sadly, some of our law enforcement personnel are forced to shoot to kill, so there are "executions" without judge or jury. Then there are the cases, like just recently, where two incarcerated felons were found murdered. There was also the case of a felon murdering another on a bus when they were being transported. As for the fear that some innocent person might be executed by mistake, what about the true innocents who are murdered by those who have murdered before?
NEWS
March 1, 2011
No doubt that making sure only the guilty are executed must be done 100 percent of the time. And as The Sun's editorial ("Double Victims," Feb. 27) opines by quoting Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger saying, "we're as close to infallible as you can be in Maryland now," we should have confidence that the death penalty is meeting the 100 percent standard. Mr. Shellenberger is referring to the revised law passed just two years ago that only allows a death penalty when there is physical evidence, such as DNA, or a videotaped confession.
NEWS
By Helen Prejean and Heather Mizeur | January 17, 2013
On the heels of an election that affirmed the Free State's desire for equal opportunities and protections under the law for everyone, we see a path to another victory for fairness and justice. It's time for Maryland to abolish the death penalty. Maryland is on the cusp of putting an end to this failed experiment in orchestrated killing. Like the coalition that crossed faith, political, racial and economic boundaries to pass the Dream Act and marriage equality, a similarly strong alliance is emerging to end the death penalty and to replace it with a conviction of life in prison without the possibility of parole.
NEWS
June 14, 2010
Last week, a state trooper was killed in Prince George's County. Gov. Martin O'Malley, speaking of the killer, said: " There are a small number of brutal, cold people that would take another's life without thinking about it." That's why many of us support the death penalty that the governor opposes. Mark Plogman, Pikesville
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