Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDeath Penalty
IN THE NEWS

Death Penalty

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 18, 2013
This is why I believe in the death penalty ("Lori, O'Malley, others ask death penalty's end," Feb. 15). As a combat infantryman in World War II, my function was to kill people of whom I had no knowledge. If I was extraordinarily good at this, my actions would be celebrated, and I would be recognized. I'll make an assumption as to the kind of life that many of these people awaiting execution had. They came from a dysfunctional family, very poor, drugs, not much education, etc. We all know the story.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 13, 2014
If voters remember anything from Martin O'Malley's first run for governor eight years ago, it's probably two big promises: to roll back a big increase in BGE rates and to end the culture of divisiveness in Annapolis to bring lawmakers together to get things done. The first promise didn't happen. But the second? Boy did it ever. Mr. O'Malley wrapped up his eighth and final General Assembly session as governor on Monday, bringing to close what is a remarkable run of success even by the standards of Maryland's powerful governors.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 2, 2011
With the more sophisticated tools now available to prove guilt, it is even more imperative that the death penalty be retained. ("Double victims," Feb. 27.) Certainly there are crimes so heinous that they cannot be overlooked by society. No murderer should feel that he or she is immune to the ultimate sentence, whether carried out or not. Expediency in trying cases many times has led to reduced sentences and in the worst-case scenario release of individuals to once again prey on society.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  KUDOS The Greeks, if you recollect your Homer, were much concerned with glory, fame, and renown, for which they had a particular word, kudos . English, that magpie language, lifted the word intact from the Greek, with the same meaning. It is, oddly, a latecomer to the language, the first citation listed in the  OED  coming from 1831.  Of course, we could not leave it alone.
NEWS
April 11, 2011
The so called "Maryland Citizens Against State Executions" do not have a clue as to what the process could be for the death penalty. Several states have the process, including appeals down to as little time as 5 years. It is not the death penalty that punishes victims, it is the structure of the death penalty in liberal Maryland that does. The Sarah Foxwell case "cried out for the death penalty" but the State's Attorney agreed to pursure a lesser punishment. As for closure for the family, do you not think that the family thinks quite often about how the individual who viciously murdered their family member is sitting in a prison watching TV, playing games, enjoying the outdoors and seeing their family while they cannot!
NEWS
January 30, 2013
I would like to talk about the death penalty issue being discussed in Annapolis ("Senators wrestle with death penalty vote," Jan. 28). The problem I have with the death penalty is that when a person kills someone, the killer will not die for his actions. He will have a life in prison with free medical care, free food, free clothes and free heat and air conditioning and watch television. If they need a kidney or heart transplant, they can be on the waiting list for a donor organ. Gov. Martin O'Malley is wrong when he said that it cost too much money to have a death penalty.
NEWS
July 28, 2010
If the senseless and brutal murder of 23-year-old Stephen Pitcairn does not lead to a prosecution by Patricia Jessamy that seeks a death sentence penalty, then something is terribly wrong with the Baltimore City State's Attorney's Office. Morty Marcus
NEWS
January 28, 2013
As usual, Gov. Martin O'Malley, the poster boy for liberal diatribe, has it all wrong again. In seeking to abolish the death penalty, Governor O'Malley cites the "fact" that even when capital punishment was the law of the land, the rate of murder showed no significant decrease. His pathetic argument that capital punishment is no deterrent is almost laughable. In order to expect the death penalty to deter crime, one must insure its proper application. Since 1976, 17,569 murders have been committed in the state of Maryland.
NEWS
February 15, 2011
To be meaningful, justice should be swift and sure. The article "Death penalty moratorium leaves survivors, convicts in limbo" (Feb 12) reveals that capital punishment is neither. Rather, the death penalty prolongs the pain of victims' families by dragging them through an agonizing and lengthy process that offers false promises. Life without parole costs less money and offers a swift and final sentence, which brings closure to family members of victims. The headway Maryland has made to limit the instances in which the death penalty can be applied is a step in the right direction, but eliminating the death penalty is the only sure-fire way to ensure that no innocent person is executed.
NEWS
December 6, 2012
I would like to thank The Sun for encouraging Gov. Martin O'Malley to address the issue of abolishing Maryland's death penalty ("Next up: death penalty," Dec. 2 ). While Governor O'Malley might have high political aspirations when he leaves office in two years, he has important unfinished business in Maryland before he goes on to the national stage. Maryland's death penalty is costly, racially biased and ineffective at deterring crime. The only way to fix the death penalty is to abolish it. Changes made to the state's death penalty law in 2009 place additional burdens on victims' families by extending the lengths of trials and delaying execution dates.
NEWS
February 2, 2014
As much as I would love to see monster Dzhokhar Tsarnaev executed, one consideration holds me back and is missing from your report. Namely, if he were put to death, it would make him a martyr in the eyes of radical Islamic terrorists ("Death penalty sought for alleged Boston bomber Tsarnaev," Jan. 30). After the horror of 9/11, I've studied this diabolical mindset and came away sickened to learn dying for a cause creates a man or woman to be venerated. It also assures the deceased will gain magnificent afterlife rewards.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | January 30, 2014
The O'Malley administration made it a priority to protect the rights of those who have committed heinous crimes, been judged by a jury of their peers and sentenced to the ultimate punishment that can be levied against them. Why is protecting those who have been convicted and judged a higher priority than those who have yet to even be born? Last week during his final State of the State Address, Gov. Martin O'Malley made an interesting comment. He said: "Along the way, we have come together, time and again, to protect the dignity of every Marylander.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
Having read Dan Rodricks ' column on one of the prime motives for homicides in Baltimore ("The insanity of Baltimore's 'disrespect' killings," Jan. 19), I think I may have an answer. The penalty for such a heinous crime is currently incarceration for as long a period as the law provides. It does not appear to be enough of a deterrent, however. The death penalty might be. It bothers me not at all if the killers suffer. Did they care if their victims suffered? Every time I listen to the news or read the paper there is yet another story of killings in our city.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
There are various opinions about Edward Snowden, and I feel a need to add mine to the mix ("Snowden has more U.S.-Israel secrets to expose: Greenwald," Jan. 6). Mr. Snowden has violated U.S. laws and needs to be punished, the question is how - death penalty or imprisonment - and if the latter, for how long? To make the public aware of unclassified information makes him a whistle blower, but to publicize classified information makes him a spy. And then to run and hide in Russia shows that he was completely aware of the damage he has done to aspects of our national security.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Kweisi Mfume was a Baltimore city councilman when he received what would be the first of many words of wisdom from Nelson Mandela. "Do not give up," Mfume said Mandela wrote him from prison, where he had somehow read about the councilman's efforts in the 1980s to get the city to divest from companies that did business with the apartheid government of South Africa. The two had never met, although Mfume had been agitating for his release since his student days at Morgan State University.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
Jury selection is scheduled to begin Monday in the trial of a White Marsh woman charged with ordering the death of her husband at a Towson gas station three years ago. Karla Porter, 51, could be sentenced to life without the possibility of parole if she is convicted. She had been the only defendant in Baltimore County facing the possibility of execution - but that option is gone with the state's repeal of capital punishment this year. Porter and her husband, 49-year-old William "Ray" Porter, owned the Hess gas station on Joppa Road.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
The current effort by members of the Maryland General Assembly and Gov. Martin O'Malley to abolish the death penalty in Maryland is one of the worst ideas that occurred in this state in decades ("Next up: death penalty," Dec. 2). With the violent crime rate on the rise, such flawed legislation and laws would only encourage criminals of violent capital crime offenses to continue committing violent crimes that under normal circumstances warrant and deserve the death penalty. As a Maryland taxpayer, I resent paying taxes to support convicted criminals who received life sentences but deserved the death penalty.
NEWS
March 1, 2011
No doubt that making sure only the guilty are executed must be done 100 percent of the time. And as The Sun's editorial ("Double Victims," Feb. 27) opines by quoting Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger saying, "we're as close to infallible as you can be in Maryland now," we should have confidence that the death penalty is meeting the 100 percent standard. Mr. Shellenberger is referring to the revised law passed just two years ago that only allows a death penalty when there is physical evidence, such as DNA, or a videotaped confession.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
The Sun's recent editorial regarding the acquittal of George Zimmerman ("No justice," July 16) ranks up there with the one years ago where you railed on about the problem with the death penalty without once mentioning a victim or victim's family. Anyone with common sense knows that the state had no case (this is why the district attorney did not indict and why the special prosecutor assigned did not go to the grand jury). The state held back evidence and had the judge on its side.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown picked up an attractive addition to his glory wall Monday as he collected a leadership award from the national NAACP at its gathering in Orlando for his efforts at repealing the death penalty in Maryland. Brown played a supporting role in Gov. Martin O'Malley's succesful effort to aboiish capital punishment -- a drive the governor undertook under the persistent urging of NAACP national President Benjamin Jealous. Jealous pointedly noted that Brown is attempting to become the first black governor of a state south of the Mason-Dixon Line since Virginia's L. Douglas Wilder was elected in 1989.  Brown praised the NAACP's efforts to end executions in the United States, calling the death penalty unfair, immoral and racially biased.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.