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NEWS
February 18, 2013
This is why I believe in the death penalty ("Lori, O'Malley, others ask death penalty's end," Feb. 15). As a combat infantryman in World War II, my function was to kill people of whom I had no knowledge. If I was extraordinarily good at this, my actions would be celebrated, and I would be recognized. I'll make an assumption as to the kind of life that many of these people awaiting execution had. They came from a dysfunctional family, very poor, drugs, not much education, etc. We all know the story.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Zimmerman | September 2, 2014
Editor's note: This op-ed has been updated to reflect the correct title of Austin Sarat's new book.  Did Joseph Wood suffer when he was executed in Arizona this summer? Some witnesses reported that Wood gasped over 600 times during his July 23 execution by lethal injection, which took nearly two hours. But one official said that Wood "appeared to be snoring," while another stated flatly that the inmate "did not endure pain. " We'll never know. But here's what we do know: The quest for a pain-free mechanism of capital punishment is a fool's errand.
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NEWS
March 2, 2011
With the more sophisticated tools now available to prove guilt, it is even more imperative that the death penalty be retained. ("Double victims," Feb. 27.) Certainly there are crimes so heinous that they cannot be overlooked by society. No murderer should feel that he or she is immune to the ultimate sentence, whether carried out or not. Expediency in trying cases many times has led to reduced sentences and in the worst-case scenario release of individuals to once again prey on society.
NEWS
June 16, 2014
The Sun makes endorsements for the following races in Baltimore City: District 41 In District 41 in the Northwest reaches of the city, incumbents Samuel "Sandy" Rosenberg, Jill Carter and Nathaniel Oaks, all House veterans, have performed well as a team despite their diverse backgrounds, and they merit reelection. The delegates were critical in the effort to secure $1.1 billion in school construction funds as well as financing for the $2.6 billion Red Line light rail project while protecting homeowners living near the proposed right-of-way from losing their property through eminent domain.
NEWS
April 11, 2011
The so called "Maryland Citizens Against State Executions" do not have a clue as to what the process could be for the death penalty. Several states have the process, including appeals down to as little time as 5 years. It is not the death penalty that punishes victims, it is the structure of the death penalty in liberal Maryland that does. The Sarah Foxwell case "cried out for the death penalty" but the State's Attorney agreed to pursure a lesser punishment. As for closure for the family, do you not think that the family thinks quite often about how the individual who viciously murdered their family member is sitting in a prison watching TV, playing games, enjoying the outdoors and seeing their family while they cannot!
NEWS
January 30, 2013
I would like to talk about the death penalty issue being discussed in Annapolis ("Senators wrestle with death penalty vote," Jan. 28). The problem I have with the death penalty is that when a person kills someone, the killer will not die for his actions. He will have a life in prison with free medical care, free food, free clothes and free heat and air conditioning and watch television. If they need a kidney or heart transplant, they can be on the waiting list for a donor organ. Gov. Martin O'Malley is wrong when he said that it cost too much money to have a death penalty.
NEWS
July 28, 2010
If the senseless and brutal murder of 23-year-old Stephen Pitcairn does not lead to a prosecution by Patricia Jessamy that seeks a death sentence penalty, then something is terribly wrong with the Baltimore City State's Attorney's Office. Morty Marcus
NEWS
January 28, 2013
As usual, Gov. Martin O'Malley, the poster boy for liberal diatribe, has it all wrong again. In seeking to abolish the death penalty, Governor O'Malley cites the "fact" that even when capital punishment was the law of the land, the rate of murder showed no significant decrease. His pathetic argument that capital punishment is no deterrent is almost laughable. In order to expect the death penalty to deter crime, one must insure its proper application. Since 1976, 17,569 murders have been committed in the state of Maryland.
NEWS
December 6, 2012
I would like to thank The Sun for encouraging Gov. Martin O'Malley to address the issue of abolishing Maryland's death penalty ("Next up: death penalty," Dec. 2 ). While Governor O'Malley might have high political aspirations when he leaves office in two years, he has important unfinished business in Maryland before he goes on to the national stage. Maryland's death penalty is costly, racially biased and ineffective at deterring crime. The only way to fix the death penalty is to abolish it. Changes made to the state's death penalty law in 2009 place additional burdens on victims' families by extending the lengths of trials and delaying execution dates.
NEWS
February 15, 2011
To be meaningful, justice should be swift and sure. The article "Death penalty moratorium leaves survivors, convicts in limbo" (Feb 12) reveals that capital punishment is neither. Rather, the death penalty prolongs the pain of victims' families by dragging them through an agonizing and lengthy process that offers false promises. Life without parole costs less money and offers a swift and final sentence, which brings closure to family members of victims. The headway Maryland has made to limit the instances in which the death penalty can be applied is a step in the right direction, but eliminating the death penalty is the only sure-fire way to ensure that no innocent person is executed.
NEWS
June 11, 2014
In a recent story on the race for three delegate seats in an area that extends from West Columbia to southwest Baltimore County, reporter Luke Broadwater provides good basic information on the 10 Democratic candidates ( "A wide-open race for redrawn district in Baltimore, Howard counties June 7). But more needs to be said about how different Michael Gisriel is from most of the others. To be sure, it was pointed out that he was a one-term delegate years ago, that he was disbarred in 2009, had only recently moved into the district and is wealthy enough to have lent his campaign $85,000.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Death row inmate Jody Lee Miles asked an appeals court this week to rule that Maryland's death penalty repeal applies to inmates who were already sentenced to die when executions were outlawed last year. Attorneys for Miles, who was convicted in a 1997 murder on the Eastern Shore, said the General Assembly was so thorough in its dismantling of the laws that governed capital punishment in Maryland that the state no longer has the authority to kill anyone. "Mr. Miles cannot be executed and his sentence must be set aside," the attorneys wrote.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
The continued existence of Maryland's death row a year after the General Assembly abolished capital punishment was brought into question by two events this month, one obvious and one less so. The first is the death, apparently of natural causes, of one of the five inmates put in limbo after the death penalty repeal, John Booth-el. As a result, advocates are renewing their questions about whether it would be appropriate for Maryland to go forward with executions now that the legislature has found the death penalty inappropriate.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Convicted double murderer John Booth-El died in prison over the weekend, but a thorny debate outlived him: What should happen to the four other death-row inmates in legal limbo after the repeal of Maryland's capital punishment law? Booth-El's death, which authorities said appeared to be from natural causes, rekindled debate over whether the inmates - all convicted of murder and sentenced years ago - should have their terms commuted to reflect the state's new attitude toward the death penalty.
NEWS
April 22, 2014
In regard to the murder of two of Baltimore's young people ( "Motives sought in killings of city teens," April 19), do the motives, probably petty reasons, really matter when we already know most of the underlying causes of most such crimes? These causes have increased dramatically over the past five decades and, in no particular order, include: deterioration and downgrading of our Constitution, loss of core values, diminishment of the English language and failure to adhere to the Ten Commandments and other principles on which America was founded.
NEWS
April 13, 2014
If voters remember anything from Martin O'Malley's first run for governor eight years ago, it's probably two big promises: to roll back a big increase in BGE rates and to end the culture of divisiveness in Annapolis to bring lawmakers together to get things done. The first promise didn't happen. But the second? Boy did it ever. Mr. O'Malley wrapped up his eighth and final General Assembly session as governor on Monday, bringing to close what is a remarkable run of success even by the standards of Maryland's powerful governors.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
The current effort by members of the Maryland General Assembly and Gov. Martin O'Malley to abolish the death penalty in Maryland is one of the worst ideas that occurred in this state in decades ("Next up: death penalty," Dec. 2). With the violent crime rate on the rise, such flawed legislation and laws would only encourage criminals of violent capital crime offenses to continue committing violent crimes that under normal circumstances warrant and deserve the death penalty. As a Maryland taxpayer, I resent paying taxes to support convicted criminals who received life sentences but deserved the death penalty.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
The last sentence of the recent article regarding the death penalty repeal ("Lori, O'Malley, others ask death penalty's end," Feb. 15) quotes Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller on why the measure is structured as an appropriations bill. "It's a subterfuge to avoid petitioning it to referendum," Mr. Miller says. No doubt the Senate president sees no wrong in that. He is just practicing what President Barack Obama did for the Affordable Care Act by using the reconciliation process and buying senators' votes with handouts like the "Cornhusker Kickback.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  KUDOS The Greeks, if you recollect your Homer, were much concerned with glory, fame, and renown, for which they had a particular word, kudos . English, that magpie language, lifted the word intact from the Greek, with the same meaning. It is, oddly, a latecomer to the language, the first citation listed in the  OED  coming from 1831.  Of course, we could not leave it alone.
NEWS
February 2, 2014
As much as I would love to see monster Dzhokhar Tsarnaev executed, one consideration holds me back and is missing from your report. Namely, if he were put to death, it would make him a martyr in the eyes of radical Islamic terrorists ("Death penalty sought for alleged Boston bomber Tsarnaev," Jan. 30). After the horror of 9/11, I've studied this diabolical mindset and came away sickened to learn dying for a cause creates a man or woman to be venerated. It also assures the deceased will gain magnificent afterlife rewards.
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