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Death March

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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2003
Albert J. Bland, a World War II prisoner of war and survivor of the infamous Bataan Death March, died of cancer Wednesday at the Perry Point Veterans Affairs Hospital. He was 87. Mr. Bland was born in Toronto and raised in Egg Harbor, N.J. He was an outstanding high school athlete and played football - as a formidable 240-pound tackle - while attending Washington College in the early 1930s. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1937, and was serving as a mechanic at Nichols Field in the Philippines during the early days of World War II. Out of food, ammunition and medical supplies, and overwhelmed by superior Japanese forces, American and Filipino troops defending the Bataan Peninsula surrendered April 9, 1942.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 25, 2008
Felix Kestenberg, who survived eight concentration camps and two death marches during World War II, died Tuesday of a stroke at Sinai Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 86. Mr. Kestenberg, the son of a shoe manufacturer, was born and raised in Radom, Poland. During the years of the Nazi horror that engulfed Europe, Mr. Kestenberg lost three elder siblings and his father. Beginning in 1939, when the Germans occupied Poland, and a few months before his 19th birthday, he was taken from his home and sent to a labor camp, where he worked on the fortification of the border with Russia.
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TOPIC
By Carmen Amedori | August 20, 2000
My 76-year-old father's voice resonated through the telephone. "Damn it. Throughout the years, this has always stuck in my craw as much as the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor." War is hell and no one knows it better than those who have survived to chronicle the events. My dad, to whom I am namesake, served in Europe during World War II. He was 20 years old at the time -- a babe thrown into combat while my mother waited at home with the first of their five children for his return. Growing up, it was rare to hear a combat story from my dad. But early on this July morning, his anger was apparent.
NEWS
By Andrew Kipkemboi and Andrew Kipkemboi,Sun reporter | June 15, 2008
Tonight, 3,000 families in sub-Saharan Africa will mourn the deaths of their children. A similar number mourned yesterday; the same number will mourn tomorrow and the next day as drug-resistant strains of malaria claim more lives. Malaria's deadly march has been unrelenting, killing on average 1 million people each year, mostly women and small children, and infecting 500 million in the poor regions of the world. If the mosquito-borne disease is not checked, it could replace AIDS as the No. 1 killer in the developing world.
NEWS
By John Heilemann | November 10, 1996
MANCHESTER, N.H., Nov. 4 -- Bob Dole had decided to conclude his bid for the presidency by campaigning for 96 straight hours, in effect turning his death march into a death marathon, and there was no way I was going to miss it.So, peeling off from Bill Clinton's entourage in San Francisco, I jetted back to East Lansing, Mich., to hook up with the Bobster and then stick with him for a two-day slice of his 'round-the-clock ramble.On the flight out, I was seated next to a yuppie executive from the cosmetics firm Helene Curtis, who served the useful function of reminding me just how odd this avocation of mine is."
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
Franklin A. Burchill, a retired Baltimore County public school custodian and school bus attendant who was active in VFW affairs and walked the trail of World War II's infamous Bataan Death March -- which his brother survived -- died of liver cancer May 12 at Sinai Hospital. The Owings Mills resident was 70. Mr. Burchill was born and raised in Frackville, Pa. He served with an Army artillery unit in Germany from 1953 to 1959, then was a construction worker until becoming a custodian in 1979.
NEWS
January 7, 2007
Allen Vern Beauchamp, a retired packing company executive and a World War II veteran who survived the Bataan Death March in the Philippines, died Thursday of complications from Parkinson's disease at the Stella Maris nursing home in Timonium. He was 86 and lived in Timonium. Born in Detroit, Mr. Beauchamp graduated from high school in the late 1930s. He joined the Marines soon after finishing high school. Mr. Beauchamp was captured by the Japanese in the Philippines in 1942 and was forced to march to a prison camp about 100 miles away.
NEWS
By Newsday | January 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The survivors of perhaps the world's most efficient killing machine, the Auschwitz concentration camp, gathered at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum yesterday to mark the end of their ordeal a half-century ago.But no one present considered it finished."
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1995
Alfred A. Calambro, a retired career Army officer who outwitted enemy guards and survived the Bataan Death March, died Monday of heart failure. He was 83 and had lived in Catonsville since 1960.A native of Iloilo, in the Philippines, where he was educated, Mr. Calambro became a naturalized U.S. citizen after joining the Army in 1932. It was while serving as a scout with the 12th Ordnance Co. that he was captured by Japanese forces after the fall of Corregidor in 1942, and the surrender of American forces under the command of Gen. Jonathan Wainwright.
NEWS
January 8, 1993
Capt. Rafael ArengoDeath march survivorRetired Army Capt. Rafael A. Arengo, a survivor of the Bataan Death March who had enlisted in the Philippine Scouts in 1932, died yesterday of pneumonia at the Francis Scott Key Medical Medical Center.Captain Arengo, who was 79 and lived on Greengage Court in Woodlawn, moved to the Baltimore area in 1959 after retiring from the Army in 1959.First stationed in the United States in 1952, the ordnance officer was last assigned to the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Ala.Born in Balasan, in the Philippines, he joined the Scouts after his graduation from the High School in Iloilo.
NEWS
January 7, 2007
Allen Vern Beauchamp, a retired packing company executive and a World War II veteran who survived the Bataan Death March in the Philippines, died Thursday of complications from Parkinson's disease at the Stella Maris nursing home in Timonium. He was 86 and lived in Timonium. Born in Detroit, Mr. Beauchamp graduated from high school in the late 1930s. He joined the Marines soon after finishing high school. Mr. Beauchamp was captured by the Japanese in the Philippines in 1942 and was forced to march to a prison camp about 100 miles away.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporter | December 11, 2006
Thomas Edward Bittner, a retired envelope company employee and a World War II prisoner of war who survived the Black Death March, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at Veterans Affairs Medical Center at Perry Point. The lifelong resident of Baltimore County was 86. An Army Air Forces sergeant, he flew 23 missions before he was shot down over Austria and captured July 4, 1944. He was imprisoned in Stalag Luft IV, a German prisoner of war camp. In February 1945, as Russian forces approached from the east, he was among thousands of American and Allied prisoners forced to walk hundreds of miles west and north in the bitter cold in what became known as the Black Death March.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
Franklin A. Burchill, a retired Baltimore County public school custodian and school bus attendant who was active in VFW affairs and walked the trail of World War II's infamous Bataan Death March -- which his brother survived -- died of liver cancer May 12 at Sinai Hospital. The Owings Mills resident was 70. Mr. Burchill was born and raised in Frackville, Pa. He served with an Army artillery unit in Germany from 1953 to 1959, then was a construction worker until becoming a custodian in 1979.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2003
Albert J. Bland, a World War II prisoner of war and survivor of the infamous Bataan Death March, died of cancer Wednesday at the Perry Point Veterans Affairs Hospital. He was 87. Mr. Bland was born in Toronto and raised in Egg Harbor, N.J. He was an outstanding high school athlete and played football - as a formidable 240-pound tackle - while attending Washington College in the early 1930s. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1937, and was serving as a mechanic at Nichols Field in the Philippines during the early days of World War II. Out of food, ammunition and medical supplies, and overwhelmed by superior Japanese forces, American and Filipino troops defending the Bataan Peninsula surrendered April 9, 1942.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2003
ELMONT, N.Y. - When Funny Cide attempts Saturday to win the second leg of the Triple Crown at Pimlico Race Course, he will focus attention not only on New York, where he was born, but also on Maryland and one of its showplace farms, Bonita Farm in Darlington. Funny Cide's dam, Belle's Good Cide, lived there until her death in March. But two of the four babies she produced remain at Bonita, making the Harford County farm home to half of the offspring of the Kentucky Derby winner's dam. Since Funny Cide is a gelding and can't reproduce, the presence of the 2-year-old filly and weanling colt in Maryland is even more significant.
TOPIC
By Carmen Amedori | August 20, 2000
My 76-year-old father's voice resonated through the telephone. "Damn it. Throughout the years, this has always stuck in my craw as much as the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor." War is hell and no one knows it better than those who have survived to chronicle the events. My dad, to whom I am namesake, served in Europe during World War II. He was 20 years old at the time -- a babe thrown into combat while my mother waited at home with the first of their five children for his return. Growing up, it was rare to hear a combat story from my dad. But early on this July morning, his anger was apparent.
NEWS
By Andrew Kipkemboi and Andrew Kipkemboi,Sun reporter | June 15, 2008
Tonight, 3,000 families in sub-Saharan Africa will mourn the deaths of their children. A similar number mourned yesterday; the same number will mourn tomorrow and the next day as drug-resistant strains of malaria claim more lives. Malaria's deadly march has been unrelenting, killing on average 1 million people each year, mostly women and small children, and infecting 500 million in the poor regions of the world. If the mosquito-borne disease is not checked, it could replace AIDS as the No. 1 killer in the developing world.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporter | December 11, 2006
Thomas Edward Bittner, a retired envelope company employee and a World War II prisoner of war who survived the Black Death March, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at Veterans Affairs Medical Center at Perry Point. The lifelong resident of Baltimore County was 86. An Army Air Forces sergeant, he flew 23 missions before he was shot down over Austria and captured July 4, 1944. He was imprisoned in Stalag Luft IV, a German prisoner of war camp. In February 1945, as Russian forces approached from the east, he was among thousands of American and Allied prisoners forced to walk hundreds of miles west and north in the bitter cold in what became known as the Black Death March.
NEWS
By John Heilemann | November 10, 1996
MANCHESTER, N.H., Nov. 4 -- Bob Dole had decided to conclude his bid for the presidency by campaigning for 96 straight hours, in effect turning his death march into a death marathon, and there was no way I was going to miss it.So, peeling off from Bill Clinton's entourage in San Francisco, I jetted back to East Lansing, Mich., to hook up with the Bobster and then stick with him for a two-day slice of his 'round-the-clock ramble.On the flight out, I was seated next to a yuppie executive from the cosmetics firm Helene Curtis, who served the useful function of reminding me just how odd this avocation of mine is."
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1995
Alfred A. Calambro, a retired career Army officer who outwitted enemy guards and survived the Bataan Death March, died Monday of heart failure. He was 83 and had lived in Catonsville since 1960.A native of Iloilo, in the Philippines, where he was educated, Mr. Calambro became a naturalized U.S. citizen after joining the Army in 1932. It was while serving as a scout with the 12th Ordnance Co. that he was captured by Japanese forces after the fall of Corregidor in 1942, and the surrender of American forces under the command of Gen. Jonathan Wainwright.
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