Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDeath Camps
IN THE NEWS

Death Camps

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2003
With the haunting lilt of a single clarinet echoing off the marble walls, the guests of honor shuffled down the center aisle of Baltimore's War Memorial Building yesterday. Some leaned heavily on canes. Others relied on children and grandchildren for support. All wore white roses pinned to their blouses and blazers - a symbol to the audience of more than 500 people that these 50 men and women had endured and survived the Nazi death camps. "Despite the warm sunshine outside, there is a cold shadow on our hearts," Rabbi Steven Schwartz of the Beth El Congregation told those gathered for the annual Yom Ha'Shoah, the Holocaust Day of Remembrance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Questions of guilt and atonement that are usually the province of historians and moral philosophers arose in Annapolis during hearings Thursday on a bill that would hold a subsidiary of the French national railway responsible for the parent company's role in transporting deportees to death camps under Nazi occupation. Holocaust survivors and their relatives asked Maryland legislators to impose broad disclosure requirements on Keolis America, a Rockville-based company controlled by the French company SNCF, before it can compete for a contract to operate the MARC Camden and Brunswick lines.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 11, 1996
Arvid Fredborg, 80, a journalist and one of the first to report the scope and goals of the Nazi Holocaust, died of an apparent heart attack Thursday at his home outside Stockholm, Sweden.His 1943 book "Behind the Steel Wall" detailed the systematic genocide at Nazi death camps and estimated that 2 million Jews had been killed. The book came out two years after the death camps were started, but before the killing reached its peak. The book caused a stir in Sweden and was published in English in 1944.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | August 25, 2009
An Owings Mills man who spent years helping his parents run a summer camp in West Virginia was found shot to death over the weekend, Baltimore County police said Monday. Scott Michael Greenberg, 51, was discovered Saturday evening by his former wife in the home of his parents, Fred and Evelyn Greenberg, in the 2300 block of Velvet Valley Way, where he had been living, according to police spokesman William Toohey. Lisa Greenberg told police she had gone to the house to drop off the couple's two children, Brady, 8, and Hannah, 10. When they arrived, the door was locked and there was no sign of Greenberg.
NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. and German governments yesterday invited Americans who were persecuted in Nazi death camps during World War II to apply for "compensation" for their suffering.Under the terms of an agreement signed early yesterday, reparations will be paid to Holocaust survivors who, when they were held by the Nazis, "were already nationals of the United States."They will receive some payment -- the amount has not been set -- if they were victims of Nazi persecution "by reason of their race, their faith or their ideology."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1997
More than 750 people gathered yesterday in Baltimore to remember one of the worst occurrences of the century, the murder of some 6 million Jews by the Nazis.The Yom Ha'Shoah program at the War Memorial focused on the 1.5 million children who were slaughtered and was particularly poignant for survivors who brought their offspring and grandchildren. Many survivors were themselves youths when they were torn from homes and families they never saw again."In the whole state of Maryland, there are [only]
NEWS
September 22, 2005
SIMON WIESENTHAL, who dedicated his life to not allowing the world to forget the extraordinary atrocities committed by Nazi Germany, will himself be long remembered for his extraordinary moral courage. He served all of humanity by calling evil to account. Mr. Wiesenthal, who died Tuesday at 96, somehow survived the horror of years in Nazi death camps (and two suicide attempts) to then summon the strength to pursue the surviving perpetrators of the Holocaust to the ends of the earth - in some cases, for decades.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | December 12, 1991
BERLIN -- Although ordered to be dissolved more than 40 years ago, a German company that produced poison gas for Nazi death camps is still alive and now prospering thanks to German unification.IG Farben, which was considered such a pillar of Nazism that Allied administrators ordered it to be broken up and sold off, is trying to postpone its end by regaining property it lost to the Communists in East Germany.The company is thought to have a good chance of regaining some of the 37 million acres of land and two mammoth chemical works it once owned in the East.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | April 9, 1992
I am not one to shrug it off when public officials lie.We have seen all too well these past 12 years how private dishonesty can spoil public policy.When President Bush made his famous slip about the date of Pearl Harbor in Baltimore a couple of years ago, he was, in fact, lying.The gist of Bush's statement was that he was more patriotic than anybody else and that while the riffraff had let the anniversary of Pearl Harbor slip by without comment, he still held it dear in his heart.If Bush hadn't gotten the date wrong by several months, we would never have caught him out.When former President Reagan told Israeli officials that he had personally toured the Nazi death camps after the war, he, too, was lying.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | April 7, 1998
PARIS -- The verdict in France's trial of Maurice Papon for complicity in crimes against humanity -- "guilty," but with a sentence of just 10 years -- was apologetic, not Solomonic. It followed from the realization by the jury and by much of the public that they had the wrong man.They wanted a man of recognizable evil, defiant in his crimes or contemptible in his evasions. What they got was an arrogant old man whose crime was to have been a careerist.While the jury convicted him of the charge that had been brought, they did not impose the full possible sentence, life imprisonment, or the 20 years in prison that the prosecutor demanded.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 11, 2007
Morris Baker, a Holocaust survivor who spoke widely of his experiences at Birkenau, Auschwitz and Kaufering No. 11, a satellite death camp of Dachau, died Thursday of complications from diabetes and kidney disease at Northwest Hospital Center. The longtime Pikesville resident was 81. Mr. Baker was born and raised in Zambrov, a Polish shtetl of 3,300 Jews. "He had very little formal education because the war had started. In 1942, the Nazis came to the village and went house to house. They took his father out to the woods and shot him," said his daughter, Mimi B. Kraus, of Reisterstown.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,sun reporter | April 15, 2007
Leo Bretholz held up a book as thick as a phone directory. Printed within are 74,000 names, enough to populate a small city. The names represent inhabitants of France who were deported to death camps during the Holocaust. And Bretholz's name is one of them. Though millions died amid the terrors of the Holocaust, the 86-year-old is one who survived - part of a group that dwindles with each passing year. To ensure the lessons are shared with future generations after he is gone, Bretholz and other Holocaust survivors are working with teenagers and professional storytellers to share their experiences.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | May 5, 2006
Shirley Kowitz, a Holocaust survivor who moved to Baltimore with her husband after World War II and established a chain of local grocery stores, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Tuesday at the Jewish Convalescent and Nursing Home. The former Stevenson resident was 86. Born and raised Shirley Sznyderman in Belzec, Poland, she was 19 when she was taken by the Nazis to the Plasow concentration camp in Krakow, Poland. She was transferred to Auschwitz, where she witnessed lines of men, women and children who were to be used by Dr. Josef Mengele - the so-called "Angel of Death" - in medical experiments.
NEWS
September 22, 2005
SIMON WIESENTHAL, who dedicated his life to not allowing the world to forget the extraordinary atrocities committed by Nazi Germany, will himself be long remembered for his extraordinary moral courage. He served all of humanity by calling evil to account. Mr. Wiesenthal, who died Tuesday at 96, somehow survived the horror of years in Nazi death camps (and two suicide attempts) to then summon the strength to pursue the surviving perpetrators of the Holocaust to the ends of the earth - in some cases, for decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary McNamara and Mary McNamara,Los Angeles Times | May 2, 2004
HOLLYWOOD -- In 1988, when Divine showed up at the pop-culture cocktail party, escorted by John Waters and the cast of Hairspray the movie, people were not quite sure what to do with her ... him ... her. Dubbing the film a "cult classic" made things a little easier -- cross-dressers and drag queens were traditional hallmarks of a "cult classic," along with zombies, incestuous relationships and ax murderers. Now, of course, Hairspray is a Broadway smash, billed as the Feel-Good Musical of the Century, and Harvey Fierstein reprising Divine's Edna Turnblad is considered much more charming than avant-garde -- the man served as the unofficial grand marshal at last year's Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2003
With the haunting lilt of a single clarinet echoing off the marble walls, the guests of honor shuffled down the center aisle of Baltimore's War Memorial Building yesterday. Some leaned heavily on canes. Others relied on children and grandchildren for support. All wore white roses pinned to their blouses and blazers - a symbol to the audience of more than 500 people that these 50 men and women had endured and survived the Nazi death camps. "Despite the warm sunshine outside, there is a cold shadow on our hearts," Rabbi Steven Schwartz of the Beth El Congregation told those gathered for the annual Yom Ha'Shoah, the Holocaust Day of Remembrance.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 9, 1992
Near the end of his life, my father told me a story that had haunted his memory for half a century about the death camps of Europe in World War II.''That kind of thing could never happen again,'' I assured him, with the wisdom that comes from too many hours spent reading the sports pages.My father just looked at me and shook his head forlornly. His son still had so much to learn.If he were alive today, my father would read about the concentration camps of Bosnia-Herzegovina, and the criminalizing of language to hide the act of murder, and he would say, ''Yes, it was just like that.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 5, 1997
LONDON -- To Roman Halter, the trail of Nazi loot begins with the menorahs and candlesticks dropped by frightened Jews as they were herded from ghettos to death camps more than 50 years ago."For years, nobody wanted to listen to us," said Halter, 70, who was born in Poland and survived death camps, forced labor and the Allied bombing of Dresden, Germany.But now, the world is hearing about the gold and trying to compensate the victims.The first-ever world conference on Nazi gold concluded yesterday with a call for a speedy accounting of one of the 20th century's most notorious financial crimes, the looting of Europe by Hitler's Third Reich.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2001
At a Yom HaShoah memorial service Sunday, the Howard County Jewish community and others remembered the Holocaust and its 6 million victims in song, prayer and stories. Beth Shalom Congregation of Columbia was host to the standing-room-only crowd of about 275. Details of the Holocaust are still surfacing, more than 50 years after the world learned of the extent of the Nazis' persecution of Jews. People around the globe memorialize the victims each spring with services on Yom HaShoah, also known as Holocaust Remembrance Day. This is a young remembrance, first suggested in Israel shortly after the end of World War II. The Israeli parliament, the Knesset, proclaimed in 1951 that the 27th of the Hebrew-calendar month of Nisan be set aside to remember the Warsaw, Poland, ghetto uprising and the Holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | April 8, 2001
In the photo, the young bride radiates joy. She wears a classic white dress, a chic white bridal cap and white half-veil. Her new husband hovers behind her, smiling broadly. She raises a glass of wine in the traditional Hebrew wedding toast, l'chaim. L'chaim! To life! The irony echoes down through the years. The bride in the photo was married in Tel Aviv, Israel, in 1937. The parents in Poland to whom she sent the photo vanished in the Holocaust, victims of the Auschwitz death camp. "It's very powerful.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.