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By Peter Hermann | December 20, 2009
Bill Lehman watches the cars go by. A red pickup truck heads south on Second Street, disappears, then returns heading north on Second Street. "That red truck will be back," Lehman says. Sure enough, the same red truck passes Lehman seven times in 20 minutes on the same residential block in South Baltimore's Brooklyn neighborhood. Lehman calls out the plate number as Jessica Mazan jots it down in her log and Jessica's mother, Nancy Mazan, grabs her binoculars to confirm the sighting.
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FEATURES
By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,Tribune newspapers | February 5, 2010
D ear Reader, I'm so sorry, gulp, but "Dear John" is like a very bad relationship with a very beautiful someone: You want it to work, you truly do, but the pain, the guilt, the boredom, the CW soundtrack ... And I wish I could say it's not them, it's me, but I really think it's them. The film's very beautiful someones are the ab-riffic Channing Tatum as John (director Lasse Hallstr?m wisely keeps him either shirtless or in tight tees for most of the film), and that golden girl Amanda Seyfried ("Big Love," "Mamma Mia")
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FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2005
SHE SAYS I don't know about you, but if my fiance staged a kidnapping days before the wedding, I'd be making my own escape plans. My advice to John Mason, the Georgia man whose girlfriend chose a bus trip to Albuquerque, N.M., over a walk down the aisle, is: Be the Runaway Bride's Getaway Groom. Jennifer Wilbanks has punched your ticket to try-again-with-someone-else. Take it. This girl may have cold feet, but she certainly had a cool head while planning this headline-grabbing escapade.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | December 20, 2009
Bill Lehman watches the cars go by. A red pickup truck heads south on Second Street, disappears, then returns heading north on Second Street. "That red truck will be back," Lehman says. Sure enough, the same red truck passes Lehman seven times in 20 minutes on the same residential block in South Baltimore's Brooklyn neighborhood. Lehman calls out the plate number as Jessica Mazan jots it down in her log and Jessica's mother, Nancy Mazan, grabs her binoculars to confirm the sighting.
FEATURES
By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,Tribune newspapers | February 5, 2010
D ear Reader, I'm so sorry, gulp, but "Dear John" is like a very bad relationship with a very beautiful someone: You want it to work, you truly do, but the pain, the guilt, the boredom, the CW soundtrack ... And I wish I could say it's not them, it's me, but I really think it's them. The film's very beautiful someones are the ab-riffic Channing Tatum as John (director Lasse Hallstr?m wisely keeps him either shirtless or in tight tees for most of the film), and that golden girl Amanda Seyfried ("Big Love," "Mamma Mia")
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | December 10, 2006
DEAR CAL / / MY 17-year-old son is a pretty good pitcher, but he can?t hit much. I took him to a guy who played semipro ball to fix his swing. He hit well in the cages but not live pitching. What can I do to help him? John Rushnok, Middleburg Heights, Ohio DEAR JOHN // It is not unusual to find someone like your son,who hits line drives all over the place in the batting cage or during batting practice but struggles against live pitching. While there is no perfect formula for how to fix this, from my experience the only way to improve a hitter?
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | December 6, 1990
Chalk up the first bone-headed move of the 1990-91 television season to NBC, which has canceled the best of its crop of new shows, "Working It Out."This gentle, insightful and very funny sitcom, which chronicled the weekly developments of an accidentally-serious relationship between two once-divorced parents, languished in a too-early, wrong-night time period -- Saturdays at 8:30 -- then got one chance last week on Wednesdays at 9:30 before getting the...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | April 24, 2003
Dear Cheryl, I'm getting married in June, and am having a reception with about 50 guests. The reception is in our home, and I'm wondering how to tactfully make sure my guests don't stay too late (I'm thinking 1 a.m.) so my new husband and I have a little time alone before crashing from exhaustion. Thing is, his friends, the old college buddies, will be the ones who would probably overstay their welcome. When my fiance gets going with these guys (who all live in different cities now), he can be just as bad as them!
SPORTS
March 22, 1992
Dear Stadium Doctor:Will they serve kosher hot dogs or non-kosher hot dogs at Camden Yards?Ben Harris, age 8ColumbiaDear Ben:The first thing I want to say to you is that you are a good speller and that your penmanship is excellent.The second thing is, always eat a green vegetable with your hot dog. I recommend relish.As for your question, I am sorry to say that kosher hot dogs will not be available at the new ballpark, nor will there be a kosher food stand. Jay Boyle, ARA general manager, did say he'd like to offer a kosher menu and would be interested in talking to vendors who would sell these foods from movable carts.
NEWS
By From Sun staff and news services | January 16, 2009
Wiretaps limited only inside U.S., court rules WASHINGTON: The government does not need a search warrant when it taps the phones or checks the e-mails of suspected terrorists who are outside the U.S., even if Americans might be overheard on these calls, a special intelligence court ruled in an opinion released yesterday. The decision confirms what Bush administration officials and some legal experts have long said: While the Constitution protects privacy rights of Americans against "unreasonable searches and seizures," this principle does not bar U.S. spy agencies from conducting surveillance aimed at foreign targets abroad.
NEWS
By From Sun staff and news services | January 16, 2009
Wiretaps limited only inside U.S., court rules WASHINGTON: The government does not need a search warrant when it taps the phones or checks the e-mails of suspected terrorists who are outside the U.S., even if Americans might be overheard on these calls, a special intelligence court ruled in an opinion released yesterday. The decision confirms what Bush administration officials and some legal experts have long said: While the Constitution protects privacy rights of Americans against "unreasonable searches and seizures," this principle does not bar U.S. spy agencies from conducting surveillance aimed at foreign targets abroad.
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | February 10, 2008
DEAR CAL -- We're starting to fill out college baseball recruiting questionnaires for our son, who's a great contact hit- ter who rarely strikes out. However, last year he went through a streak during which he was hitting the ball, but right at the other team. It really affected his batting average. On the questionnaires, there's no place to indicate how few times he struck out. Do you think I should contact the coaches to explain that? It doesn't seem that the average tells the whole story.
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | March 18, 2007
DEAR CAL -- I coach a girls basketball team. One of the parents has a habit of critiquing my performance and the girls' play after every game. I've tried to be patient and thanked him for his input, but he has become increasingly frustrated with my coaching decisions as the season has progressed. Is there a way to tactfully deal with this situation without it turning into a shouting match? John Stevens, Towson DEAR JOHN -- I would invite this parent to lunch at a quiet venue away from the court.
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | February 11, 2007
DEAR CAL -- My son is 14 and has always played in the Little League and Babe Ruth league systems, as opposed to travel teams. He's now in the ninth grade and trying out for his high school team. I'm frustrated that the high schools seem to use the travel teams as feeder systems. In our case, the time commitment and expense of travel teams were too much. But now I'm worried that he won't get a fair look for the high school team because he wasn't part of the "travel clique." Is this just a problem in my area, or is it broader, and what do you think about it?
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | December 10, 2006
DEAR CAL / / MY 17-year-old son is a pretty good pitcher, but he can?t hit much. I took him to a guy who played semipro ball to fix his swing. He hit well in the cages but not live pitching. What can I do to help him? John Rushnok, Middleburg Heights, Ohio DEAR JOHN // It is not unusual to find someone like your son,who hits line drives all over the place in the batting cage or during batting practice but struggles against live pitching. While there is no perfect formula for how to fix this, from my experience the only way to improve a hitter?
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | November 19, 2006
DEAR CAL -- My grandson is 11 years old and seems to be a very good athlete. He plays basketball, football and baseball, although I think baseball is his favorite. Are there any exercises to improve his reflexes? Carolyn Dotterer, Towson DEAR CAROLYN -- While I'm sure that there are plenty of scientifically proven methods of improving a young person's reflexes, I don't think that anything takes the place of having a child actually participating in the sports that he or she enjoys. If your grandson has a sport that he likes playing during each season of the year, his motor skills, coordination, athleticism and reflexes are going to develop naturally over time.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | January 4, 1995
I AM TRYING to clear the mail that I didn't get around to answering in 1994. I hope that I can do it.Dear Sir: I keep reading about Orange County going bankrupt because it invested in too many derivatives. What is a derivative and do you need a doctor's prescription to get one? Sincerely, John HeffleyDear John: A derivative is neither good medicine nor bad medicine. It actually looks like a poker chip. People use it to bet their school funds, their hospital bonds and their water treatment plants.
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | February 10, 2008
DEAR CAL -- We're starting to fill out college baseball recruiting questionnaires for our son, who's a great contact hit- ter who rarely strikes out. However, last year he went through a streak during which he was hitting the ball, but right at the other team. It really affected his batting average. On the questionnaires, there's no place to indicate how few times he struck out. Do you think I should contact the coaches to explain that? It doesn't seem that the average tells the whole story.
NEWS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | March 19, 2006
My son played 9-to-10-year-old baseball last year for a coach who insisted on batting his son third in the lineup. The kid literally had one hit all season long and never showed promise of getting more. Our season ended in a tournament championship game, with him striking out. We had the winning runs on base and our best hitter on deck. Would I or any other parent have been out of place suggesting to the coach that perhaps he should have moved his kid further down in the lineup? John Stevens, Towson Dear John / / It's always tough to question a coach who is volunteering his or her time so that kids can have an opportunity to do something that they enjoy.
NEWS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | November 27, 2005
My child is getting turned off by the unruly behavior of some parents. What rules should be in place to prevent parents who display poor sportsmanship, and what should happen to those who do? - John Spangler, Bel Air DEAR JOHN / / This is an issue that seems to gain more and more momentum each year, and it can be a real problem. I remember a few years ago a league in New England instituted "Silent Sundays." This was a day when parents and friends watching the games couldn't say a word and had to watch the games in silence.
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