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Dear Abby

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NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | May 6, 1991
A BINTEL BRIEF: Sixty Years of Letters From the Lower East Side to the Jewish Daily Forward. Edited and with an introduction by Isaac Metzker. Forward and notes by Harry Golden. Schocken Books. 214 pages. $8.95.By the turn of the century, about a quarter of a million Jews, one-third of the entire Jewish population of Eastern Europe, had emigrated to the United States. Many of them settled in New York's Lower East Side. There, in crowded, teeming tenements, the East European Jews established one of the United States' most remarkable immigrant societies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts and For The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
First they tell me I'm going to have to deal with Abby Lee Miller as a guest judge, then they open the show with Mark Ballas singing. I've given and I've given to you, show, and this is how you thank me? Erin Andrews is wearing a JUMPSUIT. I'm conflicted about this. On the one hand, Yay for her for wearing pants. On the other hand, I'm not thrilled with jumpsuits generally. Now that NeNe Leakes is gone, the only dancer I'd be upset to see not make the final is Meryl Davis. So, that means it's wide open.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 5, 1992
IN THE NEWSPAPER the other day was a disturbing letter that underscores the deteriorating relationship between men and women in this country.The letter appeared in Dear Abby. This is the syndicated advice column written by Abigail Van Buren, who, while not quite as famous as Ann Landers, enjoys the same impressive helmet of kiln-hardened hair as her twin sister, judging by their pictures.Anyway, the letter read as follows:"Dear Abby: What does a wife do when she gets a really ugly (my emphasis)
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SAM SESSA AND DANA KINKER] | August 9, 2007
Indie and ivory The lowdown -- Pianist Julian Velard's career is picking up speed through a mixture of touring and airplay on indie radio stations. With a surprisingly tight, mature new EP and a captivating stage presence, he's definitely an artist to watch. Tonight, he comes to Rams Head in Annapolis. If you go -- The show is at 8 p.m. Tickets are $12. The venue is at 33 West St. in Annapolis. Call 410-268-4545 or go to ramsheadonstage.com. Hip-hop tribute The lowdown -- Tonight, a number of local hip-hop artists will come together at Sonar to pay tribute to the genre's Golden Age. The list of performers includes Wade Waters, Sean Toure, Ardamus and more.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | July 13, 1992
When Dear Abby began giving advice, readers asked: Should you or shouldn't you on the first date?Thirty-six years later, they're still asking.Only difference is, in the '50s, what folks worried about doing was kissing. Now it's sex.And that's one of the tamer issues she deals with."I'm shockproof at this point. You begin to question what is normal," said Abigail Van Buren, who was in Baltimore over the weekend to receive an award from Overeaters Anonymous (OA).While she doesn't condone sleeping together on the first date, the newspaper columnist has changed her mind about premarital sex -- and many other topics.
BUSINESS
By Tom Peters and Tom Peters,1990 TPG Communications | October 22, 1990
A recent Dear Abby caught my attention. (Yes, your management columnist reads Dear Abby.) It started this way: "I am 15 and I want to join a convent. The problem is, I am not Catholic. . . . I want to become a nun because I've never had adate and I'll probably never have one."It occurs to me that similar perceived deficiencies exist among many young men and women relative to their future careers; moreover, answering such questions would be a cinch for Honest Uncle Abe (my new handle). A quick dip into the mailbag provides material galore.
FEATURES
August 5, 2002
Hundreds of votes were cast online. Scores more arrived by mail and e-mail. We got more advice on advice columnists than we imagined. The decision: Dear Abby, the venerable column once penned by Ann Landers' sister, and now by Ann's niece, will succeed Ann Landers as The Sun's daily advice column. For the Dear Abby column, it's a kind of homecoming. The column appeared in the morning Sun for many years before the paper merged with The Evening Sun several years ago. It is still the most widely syndicated column in the world, with about 90 million readers in more than 1,200 newspapers every day. The column was written from its beginning in 1956 by Pauline Phillips (left)
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | May 10, 1993
Can this marriage be saved? You bet it can. Not only saved, but rewritten, recycled, syndicated and -- if things work out -- even featured on cable television."
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SAM SESSA AND DANA KINKER] | August 9, 2007
Indie and ivory The lowdown -- Pianist Julian Velard's career is picking up speed through a mixture of touring and airplay on indie radio stations. With a surprisingly tight, mature new EP and a captivating stage presence, he's definitely an artist to watch. Tonight, he comes to Rams Head in Annapolis. If you go -- The show is at 8 p.m. Tickets are $12. The venue is at 33 West St. in Annapolis. Call 410-268-4545 or go to ramsheadonstage.com. Hip-hop tribute The lowdown -- Tonight, a number of local hip-hop artists will come together at Sonar to pay tribute to the genre's Golden Age. The list of performers includes Wade Waters, Sean Toure, Ardamus and more.
FEATURES
By ELISE T. CHISOLM | December 6, 1994
She was going to write a book about it, but instead she decided to tell me the story. I am glad because I think her subject is universal."How To Visit the Very Sick" was to be her topic.Six months ago, her husband, Jim, had a stroke that left his right side paralyzed. Since he returned from the hospital, she has been his sole caretaker.She is exhausted both physically and emotionally. She had company dropping in for weeks afterward, some unannounced.Fran finds what some people say and the way they react to a very sick person disheartening.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wendy Thermos and Wendy Thermos,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 7, 2005
They say the streets of Hollywood are paved with stardust, but one stretch can claim more than its share. The Hollywood Walk of Fame, a sidewalk shrine to the immortals of the entertainment industry, draws an estimated 10 million stargazers annually from all over the world. Nearly 2,300 five-pointed medallions radiate underfoot from the fabled crossroads of Hollywood and Vine, paying tribute to celebrities big and small. Onlookers sometimes puzzle over unfamiliar names or notice the absence of a favorite marquee topper.
NEWS
By Amanda Ponko and Amanda Ponko,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
Kathy Lating-Wise of Havre de Grace and Elizabeth "Libby" Lawson-Lilley of Cub Hill recently released their first book, Letters of Advice for Child Care Providers - a compilation of early elementary child-care questions and advice. The book is a series of queries sent from day-care provider Lating-Wise to pediatric nurse practitioner Lawson-Lilley, who answers questions in a "Dear Abby"-type manner. Chapters such as health, development, socialization and eating habits categorize 100 child-care problem scenarios, conveyed with humor by Lating-Wise.
FEATURES
August 5, 2002
Hundreds of votes were cast online. Scores more arrived by mail and e-mail. We got more advice on advice columnists than we imagined. The decision: Dear Abby, the venerable column once penned by Ann Landers' sister, and now by Ann's niece, will succeed Ann Landers as The Sun's daily advice column. For the Dear Abby column, it's a kind of homecoming. The column appeared in the morning Sun for many years before the paper merged with The Evening Sun several years ago. It is still the most widely syndicated column in the world, with about 90 million readers in more than 1,200 newspapers every day. The column was written from its beginning in 1956 by Pauline Phillips (left)
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | July 8, 2000
Coaches, managers, owners - they've all failed. The inmates not only are running the asylum, they're escaping in limos. In Baltimore and other cities across North America, professional athletes continue to redefine the meaning of self-indulgence, a term that was practically invented on their behalf. Our heroes follow their own agendas, set their own schedules and most definitely march to their own drummers. They get arrested. They get suspended. They get agitated when their favorite band won't play another encore.
FEATURES
By ELISE T. CHISOLM | December 6, 1994
She was going to write a book about it, but instead she decided to tell me the story. I am glad because I think her subject is universal."How To Visit the Very Sick" was to be her topic.Six months ago, her husband, Jim, had a stroke that left his right side paralyzed. Since he returned from the hospital, she has been his sole caretaker.She is exhausted both physically and emotionally. She had company dropping in for weeks afterward, some unannounced.Fran finds what some people say and the way they react to a very sick person disheartening.
FEATURES
By Beth Sherman and Beth Sherman,Newsday | September 3, 1994
The dark-haired, soft-spoken woman on television is obviously upset. She can't eat, can't sleep. All she can do is obsess about her old boyfriend, who made her life miserable for 2 1/2 years and now is dating someone else.Under her face are the words: "Diane: Can't Move On From Her Ex.""It's so painful. I feel so incredibly betrayed," she tells psychologist Bernie Katz and behavioral therapist Cynthia Richmond, the hosts of "Am I Nuts?" an interactive advice-oriented program that recently debuted on the America's Talking cable network.
FEATURES
By Beth Sherman and Beth Sherman,Newsday | September 3, 1994
The dark-haired, soft-spoken woman on television is obviously upset. She can't eat, can't sleep. All she can do is obsess about her old boyfriend, who made her life miserable for 2 1/2 years and now is dating someone else.Under her face are the words: "Diane: Can't Move On From Her Ex.""It's so painful. I feel so incredibly betrayed," she tells psychologist Bernie Katz and behavioral therapist Cynthia Richmond, the hosts of "Am I Nuts?" an interactive advice-oriented program that recently debuted on the America's Talking cable network.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | July 8, 2000
Coaches, managers, owners - they've all failed. The inmates not only are running the asylum, they're escaping in limos. In Baltimore and other cities across North America, professional athletes continue to redefine the meaning of self-indulgence, a term that was practically invented on their behalf. Our heroes follow their own agendas, set their own schedules and most definitely march to their own drummers. They get arrested. They get suspended. They get agitated when their favorite band won't play another encore.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | May 10, 1993
Can this marriage be saved? You bet it can. Not only saved, but rewritten, recycled, syndicated and -- if things work out -- even featured on cable television."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 20, 1992
Davenport, Iowa. -- When last heard from, the Equal Rights Amendment had been forced underground. Defeated by the Reagan Revolution, it was still reeling from a right-wing attack that had cast it as a conspiracy concocted by Feminazis who were hell-bent on forcing mothers out of their homes and into combat boots.The federal amendment ran out of time in 1982. The last attempt to put a state ERA on a ballot failed six years ago in Vermont, when a bizarre last-minute ad blitz linked equal rights to the AIDS virus.
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