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By New York Times News Service | August 6, 1992
When Nick Tosches told friends and acquaintances that he wanted to write a book about Dean Martin, most of them looked skeptical and said: "Dean Martin? Is he still alive?" Yes, he's still alive, Mr. Tosches would answer patiently.Actually, a good deal of his fascination with the entertainer came not only from the fact that Mr. Martin is still alive, but also from the way he is living out his autumn years. Today, at 75, Mr. Martin, star of stage, screen and television variety hour, spends most of his time alone in a big house in the Bel Air section of Los Angeles watching old cowboy pictures.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2011
On the wall of Eddie Gaudet's office is a photo of him as a jockey sitting atop a winner in Florida in the 1950s. Tucked in among dozens of snapshots and 8-by-10s spread over three walls, is another from 1966 showing Gaudet as the winning trainer at Bowie Race Track. "He's the dark-haired one," Linda Gaudet said, pointing to the photos of her husband. "He was the Dean Martin type. " "They used to call me Dean Martin," Gaudet, 81, said, his eyes twinkling from under a baseball cap. The walls are an historic collage that will be adding more photos in the new year as the longtime Maryland horse trainer hands off his business to his wife and 23-year-old daughter Lacey.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 28, 1995
Three thousand miles from here, Dean Martin breathes his last and the newspapers are filled with obituaries, many of which are almost accurate. Everybody mentions the boozy persona and the Rat Pack and the early days with Jerry Lewis. Nobody, as near as can be determined, mentions the $60 that Dino goes to his grave owing my friend Nick since about 1947.A slight game of craps at Broadway and Thames, Nick wasexplaining yesterday afternoon. From such a thing, Dean Martin loses all the money in his pocket one night and borrows a few dollars and forgets to pay anything back over the course of the next 48 years.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 15, 2009
Ordinary Joes trapped in upside-down mortgages, take heart: even a real smarty-pants like the ex-Hopkins president is taking a bath in the real estate market. Dr. William Brody bought a Federal Hill rowhouse two years ago as an off-campus get-away. His family trust paid $1.5 million. Now that Brody has retired from Hopkins and taken a job as president of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies out in California, the place is for sale. List price: $1.3 million. Brody has a doctorate in engineering and a medical degree.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
Greg Garrison, 81, who directed such stars as Dean Martin, Jack Benny, George Burns and Lucille Ball during a 40-year television career, died of pneumonia March 25 at his home near Los Angeles. Mr. Garrison directed nearly 4,000 shows in his career, but was probably best known for his work on The Dean Martin Show and Martin's popular Celebrity Roasts. He also directed Your Show of Shows, the comedy-variety program that starred Sid Caesar, Imogene Coca, Carl Reiner and Howard Morris. When he directed such stars as Orson Welles, Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald on Celebrity Roasts, Mr. Garrison always had their respect, recalled Dom DeLuise, who appeared frequently on The Dean Martin Show.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 15, 2009
Ordinary Joes trapped in upside-down mortgages, take heart: even a real smarty-pants like the ex-Hopkins president is taking a bath in the real estate market. Dr. William Brody bought a Federal Hill rowhouse two years ago as an off-campus get-away. His family trust paid $1.5 million. Now that Brody has retired from Hopkins and taken a job as president of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies out in California, the place is for sale. List price: $1.3 million. Brody has a doctorate in engineering and a medical degree.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | January 16, 1996
C The "Baltimore Glimpses" article on yesterday's op/ed page referred to the death of Lou Baumel. Mr. Baumel is in fact very much alive.The Sun regrets the errors.POP SINGER and movie star Dean Martin died a few weeks back. It's too bad Lou Baumel died first, a few years earlier. Lou was one of the owners of the Club Charles, at Charles and Preston streets, where Loyola Federal is today.In the days when Baltimore was a big night club town, the Club Charles and the Chanticleer (Charles and Eager)
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | June 3, 2007
DEAN MARTIN & JERRY LEWIS COLLECTION Volume Two -- Paramount Home Entertainment / $34.99 To moviegoers of the 1950s, the young Jerry Lewis was a major comic, a pratfall-prone clown who would stop at nothing for a laugh. If his exuberant whining was sometimes hard to bear, his rough edges were smoothed out by his partner, the crooner Dean Martin, who was everything Lewis was not - composed, confident and cool. Their strange but oddly effective chemistry is given full range in a quintet of movies set for release Tuesday on DVD. The package, which has no bonus features, includes one of Martin and Lewis' top-grossing pictures, Living It Up (1954)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 11, 1993
Here's a meaningless but amusing question: What is the single least lamented, most absurd minor film genre? You say teen-age slasher pix? You don't win. You say midget westerns? You don't win either. You say campy Japanese monster movies? You don't even come close. (Some of them were pretty good!)Here's the answer: James Bond knock-offs. In the mid-'60s, after Sean Connery broke through to world celebrity with the Bond films, there was a brief spurt of minor clones of utterly no consequence.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 16, 1998
He embodied our most wholesome ideals and our darkest impulses in one single, stylish glissando. Frank Sinatra, who started as what he off-handedly called a "saloon singer," surprised them all when he began a serious acting career: Like everything in show business to which he turned his prodigious talents, he succeeded at movies, too, at least some of the time.After making his feature film debut in 1941 with the Tommy Dorsey band in "Las Vegas Nights," Sinatra went on to make nearly 60 movies, which described an arc as paradoxical as the man himself.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | June 3, 2007
DEAN MARTIN & JERRY LEWIS COLLECTION Volume Two -- Paramount Home Entertainment / $34.99 To moviegoers of the 1950s, the young Jerry Lewis was a major comic, a pratfall-prone clown who would stop at nothing for a laugh. If his exuberant whining was sometimes hard to bear, his rough edges were smoothed out by his partner, the crooner Dean Martin, who was everything Lewis was not - composed, confident and cool. Their strange but oddly effective chemistry is given full range in a quintet of movies set for release Tuesday on DVD. The package, which has no bonus features, includes one of Martin and Lewis' top-grossing pictures, Living It Up (1954)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Monica Eng and Monica Eng,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 31, 2005
At his Malibu, Calif., home, it's a day of celebration for Glen Campbell. It's the day he gets to remove the Intoxalock from his car. "Whoever invented that thing should be hit upside the head with a crowbar -- or at least a cane or a pool cue," the country icon growls over the phone, referring to the Breathalyzer-type device linked to a car's ignition system that he had to blow into to start his car. "You know it's not even technically legal, but they...
NEWS
April 4, 2005
Greg Garrison, 81, who directed such stars as Dean Martin, Jack Benny, George Burns and Lucille Ball during a 40-year television career, died of pneumonia March 25 at his home near Los Angeles. Mr. Garrison directed nearly 4,000 shows in his career, but was probably best known for his work on The Dean Martin Show and Martin's popular Celebrity Roasts. He also directed Your Show of Shows, the comedy-variety program that starred Sid Caesar, Imogene Coca, Carl Reiner and Howard Morris. When he directed such stars as Orson Welles, Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald on Celebrity Roasts, Mr. Garrison always had their respect, recalled Dom DeLuise, who appeared frequently on The Dean Martin Show.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 2002
Let's get the ground rules established right away. Contact is a musical in which there is no singing. It hardly has any dialogue. And while we're at it, you should know that this Broadway show relies on taped music rather than a live band. Does all that sound like a turnoff? Well, guess what, Contact is a clever and classy show whose almost nonstop dancing makes it a must-see at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre. It's easy to see why it won four Tony Awards in 2000, including best musical.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 16, 1998
He embodied our most wholesome ideals and our darkest impulses in one single, stylish glissando. Frank Sinatra, who started as what he off-handedly called a "saloon singer," surprised them all when he began a serious acting career: Like everything in show business to which he turned his prodigious talents, he succeeded at movies, too, at least some of the time.After making his feature film debut in 1941 with the Tommy Dorsey band in "Las Vegas Nights," Sinatra went on to make nearly 60 movies, which described an arc as paradoxical as the man himself.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | January 16, 1996
C The "Baltimore Glimpses" article on yesterday's op/ed page referred to the death of Lou Baumel. Mr. Baumel is in fact very much alive.The Sun regrets the errors.POP SINGER and movie star Dean Martin died a few weeks back. It's too bad Lou Baumel died first, a few years earlier. Lou was one of the owners of the Club Charles, at Charles and Preston streets, where Loyola Federal is today.In the days when Baltimore was a big night club town, the Club Charles and the Chanticleer (Charles and Eager)
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 2002
Let's get the ground rules established right away. Contact is a musical in which there is no singing. It hardly has any dialogue. And while we're at it, you should know that this Broadway show relies on taped music rather than a live band. Does all that sound like a turnoff? Well, guess what, Contact is a clever and classy show whose almost nonstop dancing makes it a must-see at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre. It's easy to see why it won four Tony Awards in 2000, including best musical.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2011
On the wall of Eddie Gaudet's office is a photo of him as a jockey sitting atop a winner in Florida in the 1950s. Tucked in among dozens of snapshots and 8-by-10s spread over three walls, is another from 1966 showing Gaudet as the winning trainer at Bowie Race Track. "He's the dark-haired one," Linda Gaudet said, pointing to the photos of her husband. "He was the Dean Martin type. " "They used to call me Dean Martin," Gaudet, 81, said, his eyes twinkling from under a baseball cap. The walls are an historic collage that will be adding more photos in the new year as the longtime Maryland horse trainer hands off his business to his wife and 23-year-old daughter Lacey.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 28, 1995
Three thousand miles from here, Dean Martin breathes his last and the newspapers are filled with obituaries, many of which are almost accurate. Everybody mentions the boozy persona and the Rat Pack and the early days with Jerry Lewis. Nobody, as near as can be determined, mentions the $60 that Dino goes to his grave owing my friend Nick since about 1947.A slight game of craps at Broadway and Thames, Nick wasexplaining yesterday afternoon. From such a thing, Dean Martin loses all the money in his pocket one night and borrows a few dollars and forgets to pay anything back over the course of the next 48 years.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 11, 1993
Here's a meaningless but amusing question: What is the single least lamented, most absurd minor film genre? You say teen-age slasher pix? You don't win. You say midget westerns? You don't win either. You say campy Japanese monster movies? You don't even come close. (Some of them were pretty good!)Here's the answer: James Bond knock-offs. In the mid-'60s, after Sean Connery broke through to world celebrity with the Bond films, there was a brief spurt of minor clones of utterly no consequence.
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