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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
I am not going to go deep on live TV coverage Friday of events commemorating the 50th anniversary of the death of John F. Kennedy in Dallas. I was a TV columnist at the Dallas Times Herald during the 25th anniversary and I have endured all the media memorials of that horrible day in 1963 that anyone should be asked to bear. I wrote them up and I wrote them down as the civic leadership and media of Dallas tried to rehabilitate the city's image as much as righteously remember the president that died there in 1963.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
I am not going to go deep on live TV coverage Friday of events commemorating the 50th anniversary of the death of John F. Kennedy in Dallas. I was a TV columnist at the Dallas Times Herald during the 25th anniversary and I have endured all the media memorials of that horrible day in 1963 that anyone should be asked to bear. I wrote them up and I wrote them down as the civic leadership and media of Dallas tried to rehabilitate the city's image as much as righteously remember the president that died there in 1963.
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NEWS
By Chris Kridler | September 10, 1995
"Painted Desert" by Frederick Barthelme. New York: Viking. 245 pages, $22.95Frederick Barthelme's new novel isn't about the end of our voyage. It's about the roads we take to get there. "Painted Desert" is literally a road trip, as Del and Jen, the odd couple Mr. Barthelme wrote about in his novel "The Brothers," decide to do something about this terrible world by driving from Mississippi to the "ground zero" of America's troubles: Los Angeles, home of the O.J. Simpson follies and that engrossing TV show called the L.A. Riots.
NEWS
By DAVID MICHAEL ETTLIN | November 24, 1996
Even after 33 years, the grainy images replayed on an occasional television special are riveting. The open-top Lincoln, the roses, a kiss on the flag-draped casket, the heart-wrenching salute from a son just turned 3.Every year, the images come back around Nov. 22 to mark the passage of another year since the innocence of my baby boomer generation was assassinated along with John Kennedy in Dallas.We were teens entering adulthood, with the bullets in Dealey Plaza marking our passage.I've avoided rewatching the Zapruder film, so vivid in the instant splatter of red that Hollywood imitates it - and so powerful that it brought a touch of immortality to Abraham Zapruder, the amateur photographer who aimed his camera at so fateful a moment.
NEWS
By DAVID MICHAEL ETTLIN | November 24, 1996
Even after 33 years, the grainy images replayed on an occasional television special are riveting. The open-top Lincoln, the roses, a kiss on the flag-draped casket, the heart-wrenching salute from a son just turned 3.Every year, the images come back around Nov. 22 to mark the passage of another year since the innocence of my baby boomer generation was assassinated along with John Kennedy in Dallas.We were teens entering adulthood, with the bullets in Dealey Plaza marking our passage.I've avoided rewatching the Zapruder film, so vivid in the instant splatter of red that Hollywood imitates it - and so powerful that it brought a touch of immortality to Abraham Zapruder, the amateur photographer who aimed his camera at so fateful a moment.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1996
Time to bring back those memories of the Dealey Plaza motorcade. Rent a copy of "JFK." Re-read the Warren Commission Report. And get ready to rekindle the never-ending conspiracy theories surrounding the death of President John F. Kennedy.Only this time, one of those theories will be played out in federal court in Baltimore, where a former U.S. Secret Service agent assigned to protect the president on the day of his death nearly 33 years ago is suing for libel.A little-known book called "Mortal Error: The Shot That Killed JFK" claims that the agent from Cecil County slipped and accidentally pulled the trigger of his high-powered AR-15 rifle, striking Kennedy in the head on Nov. 22, 1963.
FEATURES
By John Newman and John Newman,Contributing Writer | September 22, 1993
The first thing that strikes you upon opening this new book on the assassination of John F. Kennedy is that author Gerald Posner has not seen the hundreds of thousands of pages of newly released documents. They were declassified pursuant to the JFK records act and signed into law by then-President Bush in January. I have spent countless evenings immersed in these files over the past six months and find that the very title of Mr. Posner's book is presumptuous: It asks us to believe he has closed the case before we have had a chance to digest the facts that have only now been made public.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | June 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Several longtime critics of the Warren Commission report asked yesterday to remove bullet fragments from the body of former Texas Gov. John Connally.Mr. Connally was wounded in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas. The JFK researchers argue that scientific tests on fragments still lodged in Mr. Connally's wrist and thigh will prove that more than one assailant fired on the presidential limousine in Dealey Plaza.In letters to Attorney General Janet Reno and Texas Gov. Ann Richards, the researchers asked for help in allowing the fragments to be removed from Mr. Connally's body before its scheduled burial today in Austin, Texas.
NEWS
January 28, 2005
Nick McDonald, 76, the Dallas police officer who arrested Lee Harvey Oswald at a movie theater after President Kennedy was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963, died yesterday in Hot Springs, Ark., from diabetes complications. Mr. McDonald arrived at Dallas' Dealey Plaza moments after the shooting. About 90 minutes later, he searched the Texas Theater and helped make the historic arrest, grappling with the man who had killed the president. "He made a fist and bam, hit me right between the eyes," Mr. McDonald recalled years afterward.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 16, 1993
Tonight's TV is dominated by specials and special events: a fabulous three-hour "Frontline" on Lee Harvey Oswald, Part 2 of "Return to Lonesome Dove" and a two-hour nostalgia special geared to the 1970s.* "A 70's Celebration: The Beat is Back" (8-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Here's the difference between the '60s, the era when baby boomers came of age, and the '70s, the "Disco Duck" decade celebrated in this slick variety special from Ken Ehrlich Productions: In the '60s, a sentence beginning "Where were you when you first heard . . ."
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1996
Time to bring back those memories of the Dealey Plaza motorcade. Rent a copy of "JFK." Re-read the Warren Commission Report. And get ready to rekindle the never-ending conspiracy theories surrounding the death of President John F. Kennedy.Only this time, one of those theories will be played out in federal court in Baltimore, where a former U.S. Secret Service agent assigned to protect the president on the day of his death nearly 33 years ago is suing for libel.A little-known book called "Mortal Error: The Shot That Killed JFK" claims that the agent from Cecil County slipped and accidentally pulled the trigger of his high-powered AR-15 rifle, striking Kennedy in the head on Nov. 22, 1963.
NEWS
By Chris Kridler | September 10, 1995
"Painted Desert" by Frederick Barthelme. New York: Viking. 245 pages, $22.95Frederick Barthelme's new novel isn't about the end of our voyage. It's about the roads we take to get there. "Painted Desert" is literally a road trip, as Del and Jen, the odd couple Mr. Barthelme wrote about in his novel "The Brothers," decide to do something about this terrible world by driving from Mississippi to the "ground zero" of America's troubles: Los Angeles, home of the O.J. Simpson follies and that engrossing TV show called the L.A. Riots.
NEWS
November 10, 2000
Mary Teresa Schaefer, 43, administrative assistant Mary Teresa Schaefer, a Goucher College administrative assistant who was active in the Girl Scouts, died Sunday of lung cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 43 and lived in Perry Hall. For the past eight years, she had been an administrative assistant in Goucher's department of continuing studies. Born in Baltimore and raised in Perry Hall, Mary Teresa Hellmann was a graduate of St. Joseph's parochial school in Fullerton and Perry Hall High School, where she was a member of the class of 1975.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | September 27, 1991
Even from the distance of almost 30 years, it is still shocking to review the events that took place Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas. Especially hard to watch is the grainy footage of a bullet hitting President John F. Kennedy in the skull, snapping his head back against the limousine seat and sending a pink spray into the air.We see that moment multiple times -- and be warned it is sometimes in close-up slow motion -- during the premiere segment tonight of...
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