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By Caroline Solomon and Jeffrey Archer Miller | April 25, 2014
In the midst of the misery of Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the media fell in love with then-New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's sign language interpreter, Lydia Callis, who captivated audiences with her expressive renderings of Mr. Bloomberg's humdrum press conferences. "A bright light during dark days: Bloomberg's sign language star," swooned National Public Radio. New York Magazine praised her as "a legitimate reason to smile" in difficult times. And Saturday Night Live, in a sign she had truly arrived, impersonated her during an opening skit.
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NEWS
By Caroline Solomon and Jeffrey Archer Miller | April 25, 2014
In the midst of the misery of Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the media fell in love with then-New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's sign language interpreter, Lydia Callis, who captivated audiences with her expressive renderings of Mr. Bloomberg's humdrum press conferences. "A bright light during dark days: Bloomberg's sign language star," swooned National Public Radio. New York Magazine praised her as "a legitimate reason to smile" in difficult times. And Saturday Night Live, in a sign she had truly arrived, impersonated her during an opening skit.
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NEWS
By Kelby Brick | December 17, 2013
Among the distinguished heads of state and dignitaries at Nelson Mandela's memorial service, one man stood out for the wrong reasons. The event featured a fraudster on stage pretending to be a sign language interpreter. Wilma Newhoudt-Druchen, the first deaf woman to be elected to the South African parliament (and one of the few deaf elected politicians in the world) immediately demanded that the man be removed. The impostor deprived deaf South Africans the opportunity to participate with their country in mourning, honoring and celebrating Mr. Mandela and his commitment to civil and human rights - a brazenly oppressive act that drew wide outrage.
NEWS
By Kelby Brick | December 17, 2013
Among the distinguished heads of state and dignitaries at Nelson Mandela's memorial service, one man stood out for the wrong reasons. The event featured a fraudster on stage pretending to be a sign language interpreter. Wilma Newhoudt-Druchen, the first deaf woman to be elected to the South African parliament (and one of the few deaf elected politicians in the world) immediately demanded that the man be removed. The impostor deprived deaf South Africans the opportunity to participate with their country in mourning, honoring and celebrating Mr. Mandela and his commitment to civil and human rights - a brazenly oppressive act that drew wide outrage.
FEATURES
By Colleen Freyvogel and Colleen Freyvogel,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2002
Fred Michael Beam, Irvine Stewart and Warren "Wawa" Snipe live in a world where music is a feeling, a vibe, a heartbeat - but not a sound. Imagine counting each step, each stride, each movement, but never hearing a beat. That may sound like an unusual world in which to dance, but for these three men, it is a way of life. They are the three founding members of an all-male deaf dance troupe, the Wild Zappers. At a practice last week in Washington, alongside the women of the National Deaf Dance Theatre, it was hard to notice things that were different from other dancers.
BUSINESS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | September 5, 1991
After getting assurances that an initial 45-cent monthly surcharge on individual phone bills will be reduced soon, the Board of Public Works approved a $32.7 million contract setting up the first statewide telecommunications system for the Maryland's 350,000 hearing- and speech-impaired residents.The approval drew smiles and applause from several dozen deaf people who followed the board's action yesterday in Annapolis by watching a sign language translator.Using a sophisticated telephone and computer package known as Telecommunications Relay Services (TRS)
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | July 26, 1992
FREDERICK -- Ask James E. Tucker for a brief history of the Maryland School for the Deaf, and he takes you back to the early 1800s and the founding of the country's first school for the deaf in Hartford, Conn.Ask him how the Maryland School for the Deaf educates its students, and he runs you through the entire history of deaf education in the world.Mr. Tucker is effusive as he talks about deaf people and their history. He says educating the public is a primary mission in his new job as superintendent of the Maryland School for the Deaf.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2013
It was McCay Vernon, a former Baltimore-area psychology professor, who put to rest a myth that caused incalculable damage to deaf people over the centuries. Dr. Vernon, who was known as "Mac," proved that intelligence is distributed as equitably among deaf people as it is among the hearing population. During his two decades at Western Maryland College in Westminster - later renamed McDaniel College - Dr. Vernon was the driving force that made that institution a leader nationally in deaf education.
FEATURES
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,Chicago Tribune | December 17, 1993
Answering a question by "CBS Morning News" anchor Harry Smith about women in politics, former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher declared, "I regard myself as being able to hold my own."Few familiar with Ms. Thatcher's steely resolve were puzzled by this response. But for the deaf or hard of hearing, the closed-caption, written words on the screen had the so-called Iron Lady saying something completely baffling: "I regard myself as being elder of my home."For those watching CNN's coverage of the siege of the Russian Parliament, knowing President Boris Yeltsin's whereabouts depended on one's ability to hear -- or to guess.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2000
SALISBURY - The speakers were silent. So were the actors, the comics, even the audience's applause. If you wanted to know what was being said yesterday at the second annual Deaf Awareness Day on the Eastern Shore, you'd better know American Sign Language - or find an interpreter. "It's wonderful to have this," said William Tucker, a deaf 46-year-old man from Salisbury, through a sign-language translator. "We need more events for people like us." For six hours yesterday, the deaf community of Maryland's Eastern Shore gathered to tell stories, share jokes, act out skits and raise money - all the while showing off their culture to the hearing community.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2013
It was McCay Vernon, a former Baltimore-area psychology professor, who put to rest a myth that caused incalculable damage to deaf people over the centuries. Dr. Vernon, who was known as "Mac," proved that intelligence is distributed as equitably among deaf people as it is among the hearing population. During his two decades at Western Maryland College in Westminster - later renamed McDaniel College - Dr. Vernon was the driving force that made that institution a leader nationally in deaf education.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2012
When Christopher Booher opens his email at work, a robotic voice rapidly reads the words to him. As a blind employee at the National Institute of Mental Health in Rockville, Booher relies on the screen-reading software. But the 33-year-old says it's not just technology that makes him comfortable at work. When he interviewed for a job as a grants manager four years ago, the supervisor was open to working with someone who is blind. "That sort of drew me toward this," Booher said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | June 15, 2007
Louis M. Balfour, a retired newspaper Linotype operator and a researcher of the history of the deaf, died June 8 of complications from pneumonia at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 98. Mr. Balfour, the son of Lithuanian immigrants, was born the fourth of seven children in Baltimore and spent his early years in the 1400 block of E. Fayette St. He later moved with his family to Pittsburgh, Chicago and finally Richmond, Va. Born deaf, Mr. Balfour and his sister, Ida, who was also deaf at birth, were sent to the Virginia School for the Deaf in Staunton.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- To "mainstream" or not to "mainstream"? That is the question that energizes student and faculty protests at Gallaudet University. The return of protests at America's only liberal arts university for the deaf and hearing-impaired has been obscured by other big stories in Washington these days. But in many ways, the complicated and emotion-charged politics of Gallaudet reveal a much larger story. It is a saga about identity, the many ways we humans see ourselves as individuals or as groups, and how far we will go to keep our groups intact.
NEWS
By PAT BERNSTEIN and PAT BERNSTEIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
Sign language is entering cyberspace, as a plethora of new technologies are expanding the abilities of deaf people to communicate - and not just by whipping out a handheld computer to type messages or flipping on the Internet to receive e-mails. Instead, broadband and video technologies are enabling the deaf for the first time to "convey the information in their own language instead of relying on the written word," said Janet Harkins, director of technology access at Gallaudet University in Washington, the country's premier school for the deaf.
FEATURES
By Colleen Freyvogel and Colleen Freyvogel,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2002
Fred Michael Beam, Irvine Stewart and Warren "Wawa" Snipe live in a world where music is a feeling, a vibe, a heartbeat - but not a sound. Imagine counting each step, each stride, each movement, but never hearing a beat. That may sound like an unusual world in which to dance, but for these three men, it is a way of life. They are the three founding members of an all-male deaf dance troupe, the Wild Zappers. At a practice last week in Washington, alongside the women of the National Deaf Dance Theatre, it was hard to notice things that were different from other dancers.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2001
An ambitious project to build the nation's first privately funded community for the aging deaf in Southwest Baltimore may have ended yesterday when the 24-acre site was sold at auction. Wyndholme Village developer James M. Lancelotta, who had declared bankruptcy, said after the auction that more than two dozen people who wanted to live in the proposed community had made $10,000 deposits. A company run by Stuart C. "Neil" Fisher was the successful bidder, offering $4.6 million, according to Alex Cooper Auctioneers Inc. Fisher did not return phone calls yesterday.
NEWS
By PAT BERNSTEIN and PAT BERNSTEIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
Sign language is entering cyberspace, as a plethora of new technologies are expanding the abilities of deaf people to communicate - and not just by whipping out a handheld computer to type messages or flipping on the Internet to receive e-mails. Instead, broadband and video technologies are enabling the deaf for the first time to "convey the information in their own language instead of relying on the written word," said Janet Harkins, director of technology access at Gallaudet University in Washington, the country's premier school for the deaf.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
They come to the proposed Wyndholme Village for socials each month, some with the aid of canes and walkers, undaunted by the large piles of dirt that should have become the foundation of their homes years ago. It's been five years since they were promised the nation's largest community for the aging deaf on this secluded 24-acre hilltop in Southwest Baltimore. Disappointed but not disillusioned, they hold on, tethered to Wyndholme by the vision they share with James M. Lancelotta, a boisterous, cigar-smoking developer who has alternately built up and dashed their dreams.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2001
An ambitious project to build the nation's first privately funded community for the aging deaf in Southwest Baltimore may have ended yesterday when the 24-acre site was sold at auction. Wyndholme Village developer James M. Lancelotta, who had declared bankruptcy, said after the auction that more than two dozen people who wanted to live in the proposed community had made $10,000 deposits. A company run by Stuart C. "Neil" Fisher was the successful bidder, offering $4.6 million, according to Alex Cooper Auctioneers Inc. Fisher did not return phone calls yesterday.
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