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NEWS
October 9, 2013
I don't really believe anything I write about the government shutdown is going to make a difference, but the handful of people who are responsible for it seem deaf and blind to any logic but their own ( "Fund the government, then negotiate," Oct. 7). Shutting down the government because you can't get your way about one law that you dislike isn't why our democracy was created. In fact it was just the opposite. It's what we were trying to get away from, a monarchy controlled by a few that felt it had a divine right to have things its way. Seventy-five percent of Americans don't agree with the shutdown as a legitimate political tactic.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 4, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's last four years have been about not listening to the people who elected him, and that will not bode well for him in November. Residents of Baltimore County are used to thoughtful, transparent and open discussions on issues that affect their neighborhoods. Mr. Kamenetz has been running Baltimore County like his own kingdom where residents' opinions and concerns fall on deaf ears. Mr. Kamenetz is more in tune with the developers and construction companies that are overbuilding our county to the point of being ridiculous.
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NEWS
Suevanessen2@hotmail.com | June 19, 2013
Congratulations to all 2013 graduates but special congratulations go out to Marshall Taylor and his fellow graduates who recently celebrated their promotion to the first grade at Maryland School for the Deaf (MSD) Columbia Campus. Marshall who lives in our area, boards the bus daily at 6 a.m. for the two-hour ride to MSD along with his younger brother Sammy and other deaf children who live in Baltimore County. At the special ceremony June 7, all eleven kindergartners, each with varying degrees of hearing impairments, donned in their Sunday best and white graduation caps and processed in and individually came on stage to "sign" using American Sign Language or ASL. Each child introduced finger spelled his or her name as an introduction and gave a signed presentation of what was learned this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Many a play deals with language and communication. There is always theatrical ore to be mined in the way people express themselves - or fail to - and how that can complicate so many things in life. British playwright Nina Raine gives the subject an unusual spin in "Tribes," a 2010 work about a young deaf man named Billy, born into a hearing family full of people who communicate all too crassly or ineptly with one another. This funny and touching play, which Everyman Theatre is staging for its season-closing production, features an actor deeply familiar with its central issues.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | November 12, 2013
After approximately nine hours of deliberation, the Howard County Circuit Court jury tasked with deciding the fate of the defendant in the Maryland School for the Deaf sex abuse case remains deadlocked, according to deputy Howard County State's Attorney Mary Murphy. The 12-member jury spent all day Tuesday deliberating on the charges against Clarence Cepheus Taylor III, 38, of Baltimore County, who is accused of groping, and in some cases kissing, seven girls while working as an aide at the school's Columbia campus from 2008 to 2011.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | September 25, 1994
When Heather Whitestone signed ''I love you'' after she was crowned Miss America in Atlantic City last week, she also signaled the distinction she brings to her year of travel and promotional appearances. The new Miss America is deaf, and her selection is one more indication that for deaf people, these are heady days.Sara Engram is editorial-page director of The Evening Sun.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The National Association of the Deaf said it has filed suit in federal court to compel the University of Maryland to provide captioning on scoreboards during athletic events at Byrd Stadium and Comcast Center. The association said on its website that the suit is being brought on behalf of two deaf fans, Sean Markel and Dr. Joseph Innes, who regularly attend football and basketball games. It says the absence of captioning discriminates against the deaf and hard of hearing who can't hear announcements made over the public-address system.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
An aide at the Maryland School for the Deaf was charged Thursday with molesting three girls when they were students at the school between 2008 and 2010, Howard County police said. One of the three girls – now ages 15 and 16 and no longer at the Columbia school – recently reported her allegation to a teacher, after learning that she might not have been the only student repeatedly inappropriately touched, police said. That led to the investigation, and detectives are exploring the possibility that there may be more victims, according to police.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Evening Sun Staff | November 7, 1990
Folklorist Simon Carmel knows all of the popular jokes in the deaf community. For instance, there's the one about the woodsman who decides to cut down three trees. He cuts down the first tree, calls 'Timber!' and the tree falls with a mighty crash.He cuts down the second tree, calls 'Timber!' and the tree falls with a mighty crash. He cuts down the third tree, and calls 'Timber!'-- but nothing happens.Alarmed, the woodsman calls a tree surgeon who examines the tree and tells him it is deaf.
FEATURES
By Suzanna Stephens and Suzanna Stephens,Contributing Writer | February 8, 1995
As the world's only full-time, classical percussion-soloist, Scottish-born Evelyn Glennie bewitches audiences worldwide with her talent. And this weekend, as a featured soloist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Ms. Glennie is expected to mesmerize Baltimore as well.Ms. Glennie is respected among some of the world's most heralded musicians as a percussionist of great skill. Yet what seems to fascinate those who first learn about her is that Ms. Glennie cannot hear. By age 10, she had lost all hearing.
NEWS
By Caroline Solomon and Jeffrey Archer Miller | April 25, 2014
In the midst of the misery of Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the media fell in love with then-New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's sign language interpreter, Lydia Callis, who captivated audiences with her expressive renderings of Mr. Bloomberg's humdrum press conferences. "A bright light during dark days: Bloomberg's sign language star," swooned National Public Radio. New York Magazine praised her as "a legitimate reason to smile" in difficult times. And Saturday Night Live, in a sign she had truly arrived, impersonated her during an opening skit.
NEWS
By Quinn Kelley, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Baltimore County Police have charged two men in connection with the theft of a deaf pit bull puppy from a Timonium apartment. According to a news release, the suspects are Mark Tyrone Gibson, 37, of the 800 block of N. Broadway St. and William Terrell Hudson, 33, of the 4300 block of Roberton Ave. Both have been charged with first-degree burglary and theft from $1,000 to under $10,000, court documents show. Police said Wednesday afternoon that they were being held at the Baltimore County Detention Center on $20,000 bail each.
NEWS
By Quinn Kelley, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
A deaf puppy taken in a burglary last month has been returned to its owners, police said. Baltimore County police Corp. John Wachter confirmed that Thor, a deaf white pit bull whose ears fold above his head, had been returned to couple Mike Lenhart and Anna Hiken on Tuesday. Thor was taken from his crate and stolen from their home in the 2400 block of Chetwood Circle on March 13, along with a 55-inch flat screen television, a PlayStation 3, a MacBook Pro and other electronics, police said.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Ten days have gone by since a Baltimore County couple had their 13-week-old deaf puppy stolen during a burglary, and they continue to pass out fliers, raise money for a reward and hope that Thor will be returned unharmed. "That's our family," said Mike Lenhart. "We want our family back. " On March 13, Anna Hiken returned to her Timonium apartment to find it ransacked. Missing was a 55-inch flat screen television, a PlayStation 3, a MacBook Pro, other electronics and Thor, the puppy Lenhart had gotten her just before Valentine's Day. Hiken, 20, a Towson University nursing student, and Lenhart, 25, a manager at a Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant, adopted the puppy from a family off of Craigslist but only learned about the dog's disability several days later when they saw that the puppy would not respond to his name or commands.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
A former employee at the Maryland School for the Deaf was sentenced Friday to seven years in prison for sexually abusing two girls at the school. Clarence Cepheus Taylor III, 38, showed no emotion as Howard County Circuit Judge William V. Tucker pronounced the sentence after a three-hour hearing. A young man seated in the spectator's gallery stood up quickly, shouted in protest and stormed out of the courtroom. Taylor, who worked as a school aide, was found guilty in a jury trial in November of two counts of child sexual abuse for inappropriately touching a 10-year-old girl and a 12-year-old girl at the Columbia campus.
NEWS
December 24, 2013
I read with interest Kelby Brick's recent op-ed on the signing impostor at Nelson Mandela's memorial service ( "Fake interpreter draws ire," Dec. 17). As an attorney who regularly represents deaf individuals, I can confirm that Mr. Brick is absolutely correct about the often dangerous conditions that many deaf people face due to communication breakdowns. With frightening regularity, I encounter hospitals that rely on "signing" nurses who lack basic proficiency in American Sign Language, cursory handwritten notes and rudimentary gestures to convey complex information about medical conditions, test results and treatments.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | October 7, 1990
Whisk away the past five years. Forget everything that radio, television, newspapers and word-of-mouth communication have said about AIDS since then. It's 1985. In the nation's cities, the death toll is mushrooming. Rock Hudson, having looked drawn and frail for many months, is now dead.The disease has been around for half a decade, but a slowly awakening nation finds the epidemic impossible to ignore. Everywhere, people want answers: How do people get AIDS? From food, swimming pools and toilet seats or just from sex?
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Staff Writer | May 26, 1993
Sometimes she takes a 90-year-old man out for ice cream and rides. Other times she sends cards to strangers just to let them know that homebound deaf people have someone who cares about them -- and her name is Bernice Hoeper.Mrs. Hoeper, of Columbia, is founder of the A. Eugene Hoeper Foundation, an organization that visits and provides support for homebound deaf people. Her activities with the foundation earned her Senior Citizen of the Year honors Saturday during the Howard County Salute to Seniors in Columbia Mall.
NEWS
By Kelby Brick | December 17, 2013
Among the distinguished heads of state and dignitaries at Nelson Mandela's memorial service, one man stood out for the wrong reasons. The event featured a fraudster on stage pretending to be a sign language interpreter. Wilma Newhoudt-Druchen, the first deaf woman to be elected to the South African parliament (and one of the few deaf elected politicians in the world) immediately demanded that the man be removed. The impostor deprived deaf South Africans the opportunity to participate with their country in mourning, honoring and celebrating Mr. Mandela and his commitment to civil and human rights - a brazenly oppressive act that drew wide outrage.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | November 12, 2013
After approximately nine hours of deliberation, the Howard County Circuit Court jury tasked with deciding the fate of the defendant in the Maryland School for the Deaf sex abuse case remains deadlocked, according to deputy Howard County State's Attorney Mary Murphy. The 12-member jury spent all day Tuesday deliberating on the charges against Clarence Cepheus Taylor III, 38, of Baltimore County, who is accused of groping, and in some cases kissing, seven girls while working as an aide at the school's Columbia campus from 2008 to 2011.
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