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By Zap2it | January 8, 2003
LOS ANGELES - HBO has ordered 13 episodes of Deadwood, a Western that will blend fictional and real-life characters from the post-Civil War era. The series, created by former NYPD Blue and Hill Street Blues writer-producer David Milch, is set to begin production in the spring. It will likely premiere in 2004. The series begins in Deadwood, S.D., in 1876, two weeks after Custer's defeat at Little Big Horn. Timothy Olyphant stars as Seth Bullock, a former marshal who's trying to set up a mercantile business in the town.
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BUSINESS
By hanah cho and hanah cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
It feels as if more than ever, workers are being asked to do more. Layoffs, buyouts and job freezes in this bleak economy have left workers in many offices picking up the slack of former colleagues. Besides handling an increased workload and stress, you might also be feeling resentful because a colleague is not pulling his or her weight. It's an increasingly common complaint I've been hearing lately from readers, friends and, yes, even co-workers. If the issue is left unresolved, workplace experts say, it could drain productivity and spread negativity around the office.
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FEATURES
By Steve Johnson and Steve Johnson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 20, 2004
While the really, really foul language in frontier times is the most immediately striking thing about David Milch's Deadwood, what becomes more important than the show's ability to make Tony Soprano sound like a choirboy is that Milch is telling a great story. In the same way that The Wire showed there is an HBO way to update that staple of regular TV, the cop show, Deadwood (tomorrow night at 10) demonstrates that the western can be revitalized, too, with a dose of extreme realism. The series is shot in the sepia tones familiar from quaint western photographs.
NEWS
By Diane Werts and Diane Werts,NEWSDAY | June 10, 2007
Seriously weird. But by the end of next week's second episode, John From Cincinnati is weirdly serious, too. HBO's new contemporary beach saga from Deadwood auteur David Milch is no longer just supernaturally strange, excessively foul-mouthed, often abrasive and continually vexing. It isn't even merely sun-and-surf pretty. It's emotionally involving, too. Maybe even cosmic. JOHN FROM CINCINNATI / / Makes its premiere about 10 tonight on HBO
NEWS
By Diane Werts and Diane Werts,NEWSDAY | June 10, 2007
Seriously weird. But by the end of next week's second episode, John From Cincinnati is weirdly serious, too. HBO's new contemporary beach saga from Deadwood auteur David Milch is no longer just supernaturally strange, excessively foul-mouthed, often abrasive and continually vexing. It isn't even merely sun-and-surf pretty. It's emotionally involving, too. Maybe even cosmic. JOHN FROM CINCINNATI / / Makes its premiere about 10 tonight on HBO
TRAVEL
By TONI STROUD SALAMA and TONI STROUD SALAMA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 12, 2006
Before Lara Croft raided electronic tombs, before the Green Lantern protected radio airwaves, long before Spider-Man and Batman and Superman fought public menaces in comic books, Deadwood Dick leapt from the pages of dime novels to thrill a generation in the 1880s with his rough exploits. He was as rugged as they come, and helped put the South Dakota landmark town of Deadwood on the map of American legends. A visit to Deadwood is part of the Midwesterner's classic trip "Out West," taking in such sites as the Black Hills, the Badlands and Mount Rushmore.
NEWS
By DIANE SCHARPER FORGIVING. LaVyrle Spencer. Putnam. 382 pages. $19.95 | September 8, 1991
CLOSING ARGUMENTS.Frederick Busch.Tichnor & Fields.288 pages. $19.95. Frederick Busch's 15th work of fiction focuses on Mark Brennan, a middle-aged lawyer with suicidal tendencies. Brennan, narrator of this poetic but opaque novel, experiences flashbacks to periods of physical and emotional abuse. This abuse has left him a "haunted" man unable to distinguish the real from the imagined. In fact, Brennan doesn't believe that he dreams; he believes that his dreams dream him.As this somewhat convoluted story progresses, Brennan is chosen to act as public defender for Estella Pritchett.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 25, 2006
ROBERT DUVALL MIGHT BE GOING A little overboard when he says, "The Russians have Chekhov, and the English have Shakespeare; we have the Western." But if the Academy Award-winning actor and producer was overstating the literary importance of America's most durable genre, it wasn't by much: Despite recurring predictions of the Western's demise, tonight's prime-time lineup will feature a new episode of HBO's graphic and operatic series Deadwood. And at the same time, AMC 's first original movie, Broken Trail, a spellbinding frontier epic starring Duvall and directed by Walter Hill (Geronimo: An American Legend)
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | November 20, 1994
Jeered and discounted by her Democratic brothers and sisters for 16 years, Ellen Richmond Sauerbrey dared to think this year finally she would play Cinderella. She would preside at an Overthrow Ball with fiscal responsibility the obvious theme. She would draw up the invitation list, pushing out Democratic deadwood, adding GOP faces in their stead.The big event will occur as always on Jan. 20, but Mrs. Sauerbrey won't be there in the lead role.In results she still disputes, the 57-year-old steel worker's daughter fell short by a little over 5,000 votes out of 1.4 million cast.
BUSINESS
By hanah cho and hanah cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
It feels as if more than ever, workers are being asked to do more. Layoffs, buyouts and job freezes in this bleak economy have left workers in many offices picking up the slack of former colleagues. Besides handling an increased workload and stress, you might also be feeling resentful because a colleague is not pulling his or her weight. It's an increasingly common complaint I've been hearing lately from readers, friends and, yes, even co-workers. If the issue is left unresolved, workplace experts say, it could drain productivity and spread negativity around the office.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 25, 2006
ROBERT DUVALL MIGHT BE GOING A little overboard when he says, "The Russians have Chekhov, and the English have Shakespeare; we have the Western." But if the Academy Award-winning actor and producer was overstating the literary importance of America's most durable genre, it wasn't by much: Despite recurring predictions of the Western's demise, tonight's prime-time lineup will feature a new episode of HBO's graphic and operatic series Deadwood. And at the same time, AMC 's first original movie, Broken Trail, a spellbinding frontier epic starring Duvall and directed by Walter Hill (Geronimo: An American Legend)
TRAVEL
By TONI STROUD SALAMA and TONI STROUD SALAMA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 12, 2006
Before Lara Croft raided electronic tombs, before the Green Lantern protected radio airwaves, long before Spider-Man and Batman and Superman fought public menaces in comic books, Deadwood Dick leapt from the pages of dime novels to thrill a generation in the 1880s with his rough exploits. He was as rugged as they come, and helped put the South Dakota landmark town of Deadwood on the map of American legends. A visit to Deadwood is part of the Midwesterner's classic trip "Out West," taking in such sites as the Black Hills, the Badlands and Mount Rushmore.
FEATURES
By Steve Johnson and Steve Johnson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 20, 2004
While the really, really foul language in frontier times is the most immediately striking thing about David Milch's Deadwood, what becomes more important than the show's ability to make Tony Soprano sound like a choirboy is that Milch is telling a great story. In the same way that The Wire showed there is an HBO way to update that staple of regular TV, the cop show, Deadwood (tomorrow night at 10) demonstrates that the western can be revitalized, too, with a dose of extreme realism. The series is shot in the sepia tones familiar from quaint western photographs.
FEATURES
By Zap2it | January 8, 2003
LOS ANGELES - HBO has ordered 13 episodes of Deadwood, a Western that will blend fictional and real-life characters from the post-Civil War era. The series, created by former NYPD Blue and Hill Street Blues writer-producer David Milch, is set to begin production in the spring. It will likely premiere in 2004. The series begins in Deadwood, S.D., in 1876, two weeks after Custer's defeat at Little Big Horn. Timothy Olyphant stars as Seth Bullock, a former marshal who's trying to set up a mercantile business in the town.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | November 20, 1994
Jeered and discounted by her Democratic brothers and sisters for 16 years, Ellen Richmond Sauerbrey dared to think this year finally she would play Cinderella. She would preside at an Overthrow Ball with fiscal responsibility the obvious theme. She would draw up the invitation list, pushing out Democratic deadwood, adding GOP faces in their stead.The big event will occur as always on Jan. 20, but Mrs. Sauerbrey won't be there in the lead role.In results she still disputes, the 57-year-old steel worker's daughter fell short by a little over 5,000 votes out of 1.4 million cast.
NEWS
By DIANE SCHARPER FORGIVING. LaVyrle Spencer. Putnam. 382 pages. $19.95 | September 8, 1991
CLOSING ARGUMENTS.Frederick Busch.Tichnor & Fields.288 pages. $19.95. Frederick Busch's 15th work of fiction focuses on Mark Brennan, a middle-aged lawyer with suicidal tendencies. Brennan, narrator of this poetic but opaque novel, experiences flashbacks to periods of physical and emotional abuse. This abuse has left him a "haunted" man unable to distinguish the real from the imagined. In fact, Brennan doesn't believe that he dreams; he believes that his dreams dream him.As this somewhat convoluted story progresses, Brennan is chosen to act as public defender for Estella Pritchett.
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER | April 21, 1991
The search for Baltimore's 19th school superintendent has been narrowed to a precious few candidates, and the questions swirling about have a familiar ring:Should the new superintendent be an "insider," knowledgeable about the system and the people in it, or an "outsider," not familiar with Baltimore but with no preconceived notions? Do we need another educator like Richard C. Hunter, the dismissed incumbent, or should we hire a business manager who may or may not have the credentials of an educator?
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | January 30, 1994
Jon Aluisy first picked up a duckpin ball seven years ago at Seidel's on Belair Road. Last season he averaged 143 in a single league, the Monday night Greater Grace."
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER | April 21, 1991
The search for Baltimore's 19th school superintendent has been narrowed to a precious few candidates, and the questions swirling about have a familiar ring:Should the new superintendent be an "insider," knowledgeable about the system and the people in it, or an "outsider," not familiar with Baltimore but with no preconceived notions? Do we need another educator like Richard C. Hunter, the dismissed incumbent, or should we hire a business manager who may or may not have the credentials of an educator?
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