Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDeadbeat Dads
IN THE NEWS

Deadbeat Dads

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 4, 2005
WHAT CAN BE done to help fathers fulfill their obligation to pay child support? Baltimore County is the latest jurisdiction to make the admirable effort to connect deadbeat dads to decent jobs. It's certainly not uncommon for fathers to fall behind in payments to children with whom they no longer live. Nationally, some $92 billion is owed in child support; Maryland accounts for about $1.4 billion, with about $30 million owed in Baltimore County. While failure to pay can result in jail time, more jurisdictions are figuring out that it may be better to help dads pay up rather than to lock them up. In Baltimore County, options such as work release and home detention proved to be only marginally effective, as the operational costs often exceeded the amount of support collected.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 4, 2005
WHAT CAN BE done to help fathers fulfill their obligation to pay child support? Baltimore County is the latest jurisdiction to make the admirable effort to connect deadbeat dads to decent jobs. It's certainly not uncommon for fathers to fall behind in payments to children with whom they no longer live. Nationally, some $92 billion is owed in child support; Maryland accounts for about $1.4 billion, with about $30 million owed in Baltimore County. While failure to pay can result in jail time, more jurisdictions are figuring out that it may be better to help dads pay up rather than to lock them up. In Baltimore County, options such as work release and home detention proved to be only marginally effective, as the operational costs often exceeded the amount of support collected.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | December 12, 1992
Anne Arundel County has been illegally jailing fathers who fail to pay child support, a Circuit Court judge ruled yesterday.And Judge Bruce C. Williams said he will consider next week releasing all 80 "deadbeat dads" now being held in the county Detention Center. He said he would schedule individual hearings for each father.The ruling came the day after the county sheriff's office announced that it had jailed 28 such parents in a sting operation. The decision probably will not affect those parents, however, because they have not been through the civil contempt proceedings that resulted in jail sentences for the others, prosecutors said.
NEWS
June 3, 1999
NOBODY WINS when a child support delinquent is arrested and jailed for failing to make payments required under a court order or agreement. While incarcerated, delinquents do no good for themselves or for the children who should be able to count on them for life's necessities.Anne Arundel County's Domestic Relations Office realizes this conflict. Officials there know that threat of jail time is a last-ditch step needed to shake up recalcitrant people who ignore their financial responsibilities as parents.
NEWS
By ALAN FRIEDMAN | January 10, 1993
Annapolis. -- It's easy to be outraged at the situation. A single mother struggling to make ends meet and provide a home for her child gets no support from the absent father who is unemployed in the bad economic times. But society's current solution -- to throw such "deadbeat dads" in jail -- simply punishes fathers who can't find work while doing nothing for the financial plight of the child.What we have done is to turn much of our child support enforcement effort into a system which punishes the chronically unemployed and those who can find only sporadic work in minimum wage, service industry jobs.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | March 31, 1995
WE RECENTLY learned that the state income tax return that my wife Debbie was expecting won't be coming. That $814 check that was owed to her (we filed jointly, but only she was due a refund) has been sent to my ex-wife to cover back child support payments that I owe.This is part of the state's effort to crack down on deadbeat dads. Politicians from Bill Clinton on down all agree that such measures are necessary to get deadbeat dads to pay up. But the politicians seem to have forgotten the rights of many innocent people, including Debbie.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Bruce Reid and Alan J. Craver and Bruce Reid,Staff Writers | June 19, 1992
Police in Harford County said today an organized sweep for parents delinquent on child-support payments was prompting "deadbeat dads" to voluntarily pay what is owed.In the first operation of its kind organized by the Harford County Sheriff's Department, officers swept through Baltimore and three Maryland counties last night delivering Father's Day surprises: arrest warrants. Nearly 300 parents, mostly fathers, were the targets.One man came to the Sheriff's Department building in Bel Air last night and paid the $500 he owed, said Deputy DeWayne Curry, a department spokesman.
NEWS
March 10, 1993
There's no question that most deadbeat parents with a job or the means to get one deserve to go to jail. Sad as it is, the threat of incarceration is often the only way to make them pay child support.But what about deadbeat dads (and mothers) who would rather not be deadbeats? What about those who would pay, but can't because they have neither the education nor the skills to find steady work? Jailing them for a short time may send a message, but in practice it helps no one.The children don't get the support they need.
NEWS
By Joe Otterbein | June 16, 1995
NEWS REPORTS are filled with politicians and others who lament that we have become a fatherless society. A recent report from the Council on Families in America, a group that aims to help the family, warned us about the dangers of single parenthood and offered the sage advice that we should "re-create" our cultural values.Many people are demanding that the government crack down on the so-called deadbeat dads -- men who don't pay child support.It is ironic that while society bemoans fatherless children and complains about deadbeat dads, many people favor denying some biological fathers access to their children.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | January 28, 1995
Faithful readers of The Evening Sun opinion page recently were treated to a fascinating exchange on the subject of child support -- an issue that Maryland lawmakers also will be paying a great deal of attention to in coming weeks.On January 11 Robin Miller, a Baltimore cab driver who over the years has written many opinion pieces for the paper, penned an essay entitled ''The pain of a deadbeat dad,'' in which he confessed to owing thousands of dollars in child-support payments to his ex-wife.
NEWS
November 12, 1998
STUDIES of a $12 million multi-city program to help poor, absentee fathers become better parents are not encouraging.The goal was to increase the income and employment of the fathers so that they could better provide for their children and take some of the pressure off mothers.But researchers at the Manpower Development Research Corp. in New York found that the efforts either failed and were only moderately successful in getting the men to make child support payments.The study of the Parents' Fair Share looked at projects in seven cities -- Los Angeles; Memphis; Jacksonville, Fla.; Dayton, Ohio; Grand Rapids, Mich.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1996
Anne Arundel County deputy sheriffs arrested 22 men in raids throughout the county yesterday on deadbeat-dad charges. The men were charged with being a total of more than $88,200 in arrears in child support payments, deputies said.The raids began about 3 a.m. and continued until 11 a.m. Among those arrested was a man charged with being $11,209 behind in child support payments, three charged with owing more than $7,000 each and four charged with owing more than $6,000 each, according to the sheriff's department.
NEWS
By Joe Otterbein | June 16, 1995
NEWS REPORTS are filled with politicians and others who lament that we have become a fatherless society. A recent report from the Council on Families in America, a group that aims to help the family, warned us about the dangers of single parenthood and offered the sage advice that we should "re-create" our cultural values.Many people are demanding that the government crack down on the so-called deadbeat dads -- men who don't pay child support.It is ironic that while society bemoans fatherless children and complains about deadbeat dads, many people favor denying some biological fathers access to their children.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | March 31, 1995
WE RECENTLY learned that the state income tax return that my wife Debbie was expecting won't be coming. That $814 check that was owed to her (we filed jointly, but only she was due a refund) has been sent to my ex-wife to cover back child support payments that I owe.This is part of the state's effort to crack down on deadbeat dads. Politicians from Bill Clinton on down all agree that such measures are necessary to get deadbeat dads to pay up. But the politicians seem to have forgotten the rights of many innocent people, including Debbie.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | March 10, 1995
ON FEB. 28, I went to court in my chronic battle to get the state to stop threatening me with jail for the crime of not earning as much money as my ex-wife thinks I should.On the advice of "my" attorney, a young lady from the Public Defender's Office, I pleaded guilty to failure to pay child support as ordered and paid $1,520 to my ex-wife (money borrowed from a friend) to stay out of jail. I must come up with another $1,000 by the end of April -- and pay $130 per week in child support for the next three years even if I become ill or can't work for other reasons, or my probation will be revoked and I will go to jail for three years.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | February 27, 1995
IN AN ARTICLE that appeared on this page three weeks ago, I wrote about preparing for jail for non-payment of child support. As it turned out, my court case was postponed until tomorrow when I'll again face the prospect of jail.Meanwhile, I've been collecting stories from other men about their experiences with the child support system, and most of what I have heard is frightening. One of the worst cases is that of a fellow cab driver who doesn't want his real name to appear in the newspaper.
NEWS
March 28, 1993
Get Serious With Deadbeat DadsI sure have great hope that President Clinton will give a long hard look at the present Child Support Laws established. The non-support payments that we single parents face are an enormous problem. Please notice that I am not identifying the gender of the non-support paying parent. . . . But I must say the majority of them are males.What are these men thinking? They can just turn their backs on these human beings they've created and expect our government to take the responsibility for these children for 18 years or longer?
NEWS
By Robin Miller | February 6, 1995
MY EX-WIFE's article that recently appeared on this page describing me as an uncaring man who has voluntarily chosen a low-paying job in order to avoid paying child support, proves the main point of my original essay on this page: Child support matters should be solved by mediation, not in court.What Nola N. Krosch, the former Nola K. Miller, wrote was true from her point of view. What I wrote was just as true from my point of view. If she and I had met in front of an impartial referee at any point in our mutual courtroom saga, instead of being on opposite sides in a criminal case, I believe we would both be better off. And our children would be better off, too.According to Nola Krosch, "Mr. Miller ceased to show any interest in his children from the day he walked out the door, long before child support became an issue."
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | January 28, 1995
Faithful readers of The Evening Sun opinion page recently were treated to a fascinating exchange on the subject of child support -- an issue that Maryland lawmakers also will be paying a great deal of attention to in coming weeks.On January 11 Robin Miller, a Baltimore cab driver who over the years has written many opinion pieces for the paper, penned an essay entitled ''The pain of a deadbeat dad,'' in which he confessed to owing thousands of dollars in child-support payments to his ex-wife.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.