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By Beth Aaltonen | November 8, 2012
Back from Tribal Council, Jonathan is feeling a little betrayed, which is justified. Jeff is also realizing that he's not in the strongest position with Tangdang. Mike councils Jonathan to not freak out, and to wait for a crack in Tangdang. And with all of Abbi's Crazy, it's going to happen sooner or later. Lisa, Jonathan, and Abbi go fishing. In a confessional, Lisa reveals her plan to get rid of the remaining returning players, Jonathan and Mike, and then get rid of "the people no one likes," also known as Artis, Pete, and Abbi.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Can anyone explain why police officers responding to a situation must shoot to kill when confronted by someone who makes threatening gestures with a knife ("Ellicott City man believed to be suicidal is shot and killed by police," Aug. 23)? Two such confrontations are covered in the article, and such killings have made the news for years. Granted, police must protect themselves and others in danger. But have they no option other than shooting to kill? If a person is not wielding a gun, why not target an arm, leg or shoulder to incapacitate rather than kill a suspect?
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
The self-professed leader of the Maryland-based prison gang Dead Man Inc. was sentenced to life in prison Monday after threatening to withdraw his guilty plea, according to federal prosecutors.  The plea agreement will spare James Sweeney, 35, a possible death sentence in a separate case in which he was charged with killing a fellow inmate. The former Locust Point resident, who is being held in federal prison in Texas, admitted under the agreement that he was a leader of Dead Man Inc. and that he ordered "hits for hire in order to raise money and also to enable white prisoners to retaliate against black gangs" in Maryland, court records show.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Charles Gorham heard loud music at 5 a.m. Friday from the tan stucco garage apartment he rented behind his Northwest Baltimore home. His tenant, Duane Mitchell, was known for partying, and Gorham figured to leave well enough alone. He left for work, but when he returned at 9 a.m., the music was still blasting. The 73-year-old landlord walked over and, in the doorway, saw Mitchell's thin body splayed out, face buried in dingy beige carpet, dried blood covering the back of his bald head.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
It's doubtful anyone attending Colonial Players' 65th season closer would react with "been there, done that" to playwright Sarah Ruhl's "Dead Man's Cell Phone. " Having enjoyed a bowl of lobster bisque in a cafe, a young woman answers the ringing cellphone of the man at the next table, who has just died of a heart attack, and she is drawn into the lives of his family and others who call his phone while it is in her possession. In trying to console them, she finds her life changed.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
"Dead Man On Campus" is certainly that dead, I mean.It certainly isn't funny. Sure, there are a few laughs, like when two guys in camouflage makeup zigzag their way up a street (kind of like John Belushi sprinting up the steps of the administration office in "Animal House").But the jokes are few. And the only real reason you'll laugh is that, by the time they appear on screen, you've been waiting so long for the opportunity, you'll laugh at anything.From MTV, the same folks who earlier brought forth "Joe's Apartment," about a guy and some talking cockroaches, "Dead Man On Campus" is about two college freshmen.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
The body of an unidentified man was found in a Jessup motel room early yesterday, moments after a manager confronted someone in the victim's car, Howard County police said.Police searched the room at the Cedar Motel in the 8000 block of Washington Blvd. for about six hours after arriving at 4:45 a.m. yesterday.Police would not say whether a weapon was found in the room. It did not appear that there had been a struggle, and the motive for the killing was unclear, said Cpl. Kevin Costello, a county police department spokesman.
FEATURES
By Susanne Trowbridge and Susanne Trowbridge,Contributing Writer | April 12, 1993
Sue Grafton knows how to start a novel with a bang. Consider the opening sentence of her 10th mystery, " 'J' is for Judgment": "On the face of it, you wouldn't think there was any connection between the murder of a dead man and the events that changed my perceptions about my life."The murder of a dead man? What could that possibly mean? Obviously, this is not going to be your run-of-the-mill detective story.In 1991's " 'H' is for Homicide," private eye Kinsey Millhone was fired from California Fidelity, the insurance company she worked for part time in exchange for office space.
NEWS
May 18, 1995
A Baltimore man was arrested Tuesday and charged with trying to buy $2,445 worth of merchandise with a credit card belonging to another man who died recently.The man was charged with trying to use the card to buy two television sets, two videocassette recorders and two pagers from the Montgomery Ward store in the 6700 block of Ritchie rTC Highway, police said. The charge would not go through because the account had been closed, police said. The card's owner had been dead for a month.Police arrived at the store about 8 p.m. Tuesday and found the suspect being detained by store security.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2006
Anyone who appreciates live theater bolstered by profound social commentary will welcome Dead Man Walking, the collaborative venture between Moonlight Troupers of Anne Arundel Community College and Dignity Players of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis. Also sponsored by AACC's Institute for Criminal Justice, Legal Studies and Public Service, the Moonlight Troupers-Dignity Players production of Tim Robbins' play opened last weekend in Humanities 112 on the Arnold campus and continues in the intimate theater space tonight and tomorrow night.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
It's doubtful anyone attending Colonial Players' 65th season closer would react with "been there, done that" to playwright Sarah Ruhl's "Dead Man's Cell Phone. " Having enjoyed a bowl of lobster bisque in a cafe, a young woman answers the ringing cellphone of the man at the next table, who has just died of a heart attack, and she is drawn into the lives of his family and others who call his phone while it is in her possession. In trying to console them, she finds her life changed.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Baltimore police do not have to reinstate an officer who was fired after the department discovered she was married to an incarcerated Dead Man Inc. gang member, an appeals court has ruled. The Court of Special Appeals on Tuesday upheld a decision by Baltimore police to terminate Meredith Cross, who argued that her constitutional rights were violated when she was fired from the department because she married Carlito Cabana –– a convicted murderer and a member of the Dead Man Inc. prison gang.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
A medic unit that had rushed to the scene of the midday shooting in Belair-Edison sat idling in the street. With the dead man's body under a sheet, there was no one to transport. Word was spreading about 49-year-old Kelvin Moyd's being shot. Relatives came running down Pelham Avenue, visibly upset and too frantic to cry. Two women burst through crime scene tape. One was bear-hugged by a male officer, who had other officers come to his aid as he struggled to keep her back. Then a man came down the street and a group of people swarmed him before he could confront an officer.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
The self-professed leader of the Maryland-based prison gang Dead Man Inc. was sentenced to life in prison Monday after threatening to withdraw his guilty plea, according to federal prosecutors.  The plea agreement will spare James Sweeney, 35, a possible death sentence in a separate case in which he was charged with killing a fellow inmate. The former Locust Point resident, who is being held in federal prison in Texas, admitted under the agreement that he was a leader of Dead Man Inc. and that he ordered "hits for hire in order to raise money and also to enable white prisoners to retaliate against black gangs" in Maryland, court records show.
NEWS
By Helen Prejean and Heather Mizeur | January 17, 2013
On the heels of an election that affirmed the Free State's desire for equal opportunities and protections under the law for everyone, we see a path to another victory for fairness and justice. It's time for Maryland to abolish the death penalty. Maryland is on the cusp of putting an end to this failed experiment in orchestrated killing. Like the coalition that crossed faith, political, racial and economic boundaries to pass the Dream Act and marriage equality, a similarly strong alliance is emerging to end the death penalty and to replace it with a conviction of life in prison without the possibility of parole.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
As a federal judge handed down a sentence that will virtually ensure Perry Roark spends the rest of his life behind bars, the founder of Maryland's largest home-grown prison gang renounced his association with the group. Roark, a hulking man known as "Rock," was sentenced to life in a prison Monday for his role in creating Dead Man Inc., an organization of white inmates that prosecutors said has since spread to other states and led to street violence throughout the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 5, 2006
I am very happy that we have this opera," says Sister Helen Prejean. She's speaking by phone from Baton Rouge, La., about Dead Man Walking, the work by composer Jake Heggie and librettist Terrence McNally that will be performed this week by the Baltimore Opera Company. "The music and the drama take the public through this incredible journey," she says. Journey. That's a word Prejean returns to often when talking about the path she followed. First was the physical journey -- a three-hour drive from the parish of New Orleans where her order, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Medaille, served the poor, to the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 22, 1999
ALZHEIMER'S disease was the first thing that came to mind when I saw the flier. Another of its victims must have wandered off, I thought. Anguished loved ones must be looking for him, posting copies of this flier on telephone poles and sliding them under windshield wipers in Northwest Baltimore. That's how it looked to me, and you'd have thought the same. Until you looked more closely. There was something a little odd about this flier. For one thing, "Lost" -- and not "Missing" -- appeared in bold letters across the top, above a photograph of a man in a T-shirt.
EXPLORE
Staff Reports | January 5, 2013
State police said Saturday that David M. Montgomery, 28, of no fixed address, was arrested and charged with first- and second-degree murder in connection with the death of a man in Westminster this morning. Edward C. Zepp, 61, of the 100 block of West Main Street, Westminster, was found dead on the back porch of his residence early Saturday morning. Shortly after 4 a.m. Jan. 5, Westminster Police responded to a 911 call reporting an assault at the address. Police said they found Zepp on the back porch of his residence with trauma to his neck.  Medics pronounced him dead.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2012
Anne Arundel County police are investigating a report that an employee in a coin shop in Glen Burnie shot and killed an intruder Tuesday morning. Officers responded to a 6:28 a.m. call Christmas morning at Arundel County Coin Shop in the 7400 block of Baltimore Annapolis Boulevard and were met by an employee of the business, police said. He told police that an intruder broke into the business while he was there, and during an altercation inside, the intruder was shot, police said.
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