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NEWS
November 1, 1994
A 34-year-old Elkridge man has been charged with the illegal dumping of hundreds of animal carcasses on county-owned land, police said.William Alvin Sparrow, 34, of the 6400 block of Meadow Ridge Road was charged Friday with one count of littering by dumping more than 500 pounds of debris, said Lt. Tim Branning, a Howard County police spokesman.Conviction on the charge carries a penalty of five years in prison and/or a $25,000 fine, Lieutenant Branning said.Mr. Sparrow, who could not be reached for comment, is a private contractor hired by area animal hospitals and veterinary clinics to transport the animals to a rendering plant in Baltimore.
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NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 30, 2014
Editor: A deer was hit on Rock Spring Road between Colgate Road and Delcrest Road in Forest Hill. It lay there for two weeks. It lay in front of a home on a busy residential/commercial strip. It saddens me that when I called the Sheriff's Office, when I said it was being eaten by other animals. I was told that basically that's nature's way. Animals feed off of dead animals. Maybe so, but driving by and seeing the entrails of this small animal was just too much. If it was on a country road, yes, I could understand the logic.
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NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | November 2, 1990
On a field behind an Ellicott City elementary school Halloween night, a Satanic ritual was performed using six dead animals, most of which apparently were killed by blows to the head, Howard County police said yesterday.Police officers combed the residential neighborhood in the 3700 block of Font Hill Drive yesterday asking residents if their cats were missing and possibly killed by those who were engaged in Satanic worship near Centennial Lane Elementary School.At least two of the animals appeared to be road kills, but the remaining four died from "head traumas," police said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
A woman being sought by police for questioning in the deaths of 40 animals found at a Columbia townhouse Monday was a former employee of the National Aquarium in Baltimore . A letter addressed from Howard County police to Beth Lindenau was left at the residence where police removed the dead animals, including some inside of a freezer. Police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn would not confirm the woman's name but said it is police policy to leave addressed letters at homes to inform residents if animals have been impounded.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Howard Libit and Ivan Penn and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writers | October 11, 1994
In a shallow pit on a wooded Elkridge lot, swarms of maggots devour dozens of carcasses of dogs, cats and deer. The powerful stench of rotten flesh hangs in the air.Flies circle above a German shepherd decomposing in a begging position. The blackened skull of what looks like a cat peaks out of a small white trash bag. The body of a deer rests face down atop about 50 other animals in the uncovered pit.The animals' bodies were dumped in the uncovered grave -- and perhaps in at least six other nearby covered pits -- in a wooded area several hundred yards from the 7700 block of Mayfield Ave., off Route 108.The grisly animal dump is also several hundred yards from a large county public works facility that includes a police-car repair shop.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2001
Piles of dead sheep and goats have been dumped in a rural area of Carroll County four times in the past six weeks, prompting an investigation that includes police, road crews, agricultural and animal agencies. About 35 animals have been removed from the Marston area in southwest Carroll near the Frederick County line, said Jay R. Nave, administrative supervisor of the county Bureau of Roads Operations. About evenly divided between sheep and goats, many were so decomposed that it was difficult to determine the numbers, much less a cause of death.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1997
The troubled Rosa Bonheur pet cemetery in Elkridge has been left adrift -- with no one taking care of the property and dead pets thawing in a freezer without electric power.In the wake of an unsuccessful effort by the cemetery's owner to give the property back to a bank -- which the bank has not accepted -- it remains unclear who is in charge of the 22,000-plot site off U.S. 1 near Route 176.The cemetery's caretaker quit Friday. And after Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. cut off the power at the cemetery, the Howard County Health Department found two dogs -- a Yorkshire terrier and a white, medium-sized dog -- and a pot-bellied pig thawing in a 6-foot by 4-foot freezer yesterday in the cemetery's "preparing room."
NEWS
January 24, 2001
What's for dinner? Ravens eat carrion (dead animals) along with seeds, nuts, and insects. Ravens are highly intelligent birds and live in a variety of locations including mountains, valleys, and coastlines. They move slow on the ground but are quite active in the air. Often mistaken for the common crow, the raven is larger and has shaggy feathers. Ravens will live in the same area for years and will use a nest year after year to raise their chicks (babies).
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
Unwanted cats and dogs are posing a distressing new problem for humane societies across Maryland: what to do with the animals after euthanasia. A Virginia-based rendering company, Valley Proteins of Winchester, has stopped accepting the carcasses of cats and dogs, leaving many county animal control agencies to find a new way to dispose of society's cast-off companions. "Now, all of a sudden, every animal shelter is left high and dry with no place to send their animals," said Nicky Ratliff, executive director of the Humane Society in Carroll County and president of Professional Animal Workers of Maryland, the state association of humane organizations and animal control agencies.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
Animal carcasses could be composted safely at the Northern Landfill in Reese, two University of Maryland agriculture engineers told county officials yesterday as they toured the landfill.The engineers, from the College Park campus, said they would design a building in which dead animals could be composted along with leaves and wood.Farmers need a place to dispose of animal carcasses, Taneytown hog farmer Frank E. Feeser said yesterday.Mr. Feeser is a member of the Carroll Agriculture Commission, which is studying the issue.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Within the span of a day, Kenny Tarrant can work as everything from detective to grief counselor to undertaker. "I do it all," said Tarrant, one of two Baltimore health department workers responsible for collecting animal carcasses from streets and homes, as he walked around downtown on a recent afternoon carrying tongs and a trash bag. He was on the lookout for a dog reportedly floating in the harbor and a duck who met its end at the boat dock...
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | March 27, 2010
One-third of children and teenagers who attend rec center activities will be shut out of programs under the gloomy budget scenario unveiled by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake's administration, the head of recreation and parks said Friday. More than half of the city's recreation centers would be closed down, and funding for 13 neighborhood swimming and wading pools would dry up under the preliminary spending plan drafted by the city's Finance Department. The budget - which calls for layoffs of more than 600 workers and deep cuts to fire and police - has provoked outcry from residents, city workers and agency heads.
NEWS
June 15, 2007
Remains found are those of a human male Skeletal remains found in a dilapidated Northeast Baltimore house this week have been determined to be those of a human male, Maryland's Office of the Chief Medical Examiner said yesterday. A contractor discovered the bones Tuesday while cleaning out the house after it had changed hands in a tax-lien sale. Dr. David Fowler, the chief medical examiner, said investigators have a possible lead on the identity of the dead person, but "a lot of work" remains to confirm the identity.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun Reporter | September 16, 2006
The owner of a quarantined Carroll County farm faces more than a half-dozen charges of polluting state waterways and illegally disposing of dead animals. Carroll Schisler Sr., 60, of the 2500 block of Marston Road in New Windsor has been charged with four counts of illegally discharging a pollutant into state waters and four counts of illegally allowing the disposal of solid waste on his farm, a spokesman from Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr.'s office said yesterday. The state alleges that the water pollution, which occurred March 8 and April 1, resulted from decomposing animals and from waste and wastewater.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2001
Piles of dead sheep and goats have been dumped in a rural area of Carroll County four times in the past six weeks, prompting an investigation that includes police, road crews, agricultural and animal agencies. About 35 animals have been removed from the Marston area in southwest Carroll near the Frederick County line, said Jay R. Nave, administrative supervisor of the county Bureau of Roads Operations. About evenly divided between sheep and goats, many were so decomposed that it was difficult to determine the numbers, much less a cause of death.
NEWS
January 24, 2001
What's for dinner? Ravens eat carrion (dead animals) along with seeds, nuts, and insects. Ravens are highly intelligent birds and live in a variety of locations including mountains, valleys, and coastlines. They move slow on the ground but are quite active in the air. Often mistaken for the common crow, the raven is larger and has shaggy feathers. Ravens will live in the same area for years and will use a nest year after year to raise their chicks (babies).
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | October 15, 1994
A 34-year-old Elkridge man will face undetermined criminal charges stemming from the illegal dumping of hundreds of animal carcasses on Howard County-owned land, county police said yesterday.The man, whose identity is being withheld until charges are formally filed next week, is a private contractor who was hired by area animal hospitals and veterinary clinics to transport the animals to a rendering plant in Baltimore.The carcasses were dumped in shallow graves in a wooded area several hundred yards south of the 7700 block of Mayfield Ave. in Elkridge.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
Unwanted cats and dogs are posing a distressing new problem for humane societies across Maryland: what to do with the animals after euthanasia. A Virginia-based rendering company, Valley Proteins of Winchester, has stopped accepting the carcasses of cats and dogs, leaving many county animal control agencies to find a new way to dispose of society's cast-off companions. "Now, all of a sudden, every animal shelter is left high and dry with no place to send their animals," said Nicky Ratliff, executive director of the Humane Society in Carroll County and president of Professional Animal Workers of Maryland, the state association of humane organizations and animal control agencies.
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