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SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
COLLEGE PARK -- Wake Forest women's basketball coach Karen Freeman knew that virtually anything she tried against 12th-ranked Maryland would be a crap shoot.She could hope star freshman center Tracy Connor could guard Jessie Hicks in a man-to-man defense, or go with the predictable and defend the Terps in a zone.Freeman chose the zone, and guard Malissa Boles made the Deacons pay, scoring 21 points -- 16 in the second half -- to lead Maryland to an 80-65 victory before 2,345 at Cole Field House.
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SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,SUN REPORTER | September 22, 2007
College Park -- After his program's unprecedented 11-win season that included the Atlantic Coast Conference championship, Wake Forest coach Jim Grobe was named the ACC Coach of the Year and given a 10-year contract extension, but that didn't stop outsiders from questioning the validity of his team's success in 2006. Heading into this season, it was a question Grobe had heard before: Given the subpar performances throughout the league last year and the uncharacteristic flops of Florida State and Miami, is it at all possible Wake Forest got a bit lucky?
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1999
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- Maybe Maryland will be ready for No. 2 Duke on Wednesday, because the Terps surely weren't mentally prepared for Wake Forest.No. 4 Maryland was on the wrong side of one of the major upsets of the college basketball season yesterday, as the sleepwalking Terps never awoke from a 10-0 deficit and lost, 85-72, to the heretofore slumping Demon Deacons at Lawrence Joel Memorial Coliseum.A 36-point swing from their Dec. 3 meeting at Cole Field House was hardly the manner in which Maryland (19-3, 7-2)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1996
THOMASVILLE, Ga. -- The integration of the Barnett Creek Baptist Church cemetery is done. A mixed-race baby, the most recent burial in the cemetery's serene patch of stained granite and plastic flowers, can rest peacefully now. So, finally, can her family.Church deacons, who had asked the relatives of the child, Whitney Elaine Johnson, to exhume her because they wanted to keep their graveyard exclusively white, have apologized for trying to persuade them to do the unthinkable."I got what I wanted.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1998
COLLEGE PARK -- The Maryland women's basketball team could have used a breather yesterday. Wake Forest was expected to provide it.But there was nothing of the sort for the Terps, who overcame a 12-point deficit to win, 61-59, before 632 at Cole Field House.When the off-balance, heavily guarded three-point attempt of Heidi Coleman went nowhere, Maryland (9-4, 2-1 in the Atlantic Coast Conference) escaped with an important win before facing three Top 25 teams in the next four games."I'm proud of our comeback," Terrapins coach Chris Weller said.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 21, 2000
A pair of free throws by Val Klopter with nine seconds left propelled Wake Forest over Maryland, 57-54, yesterday in an Atlantic Coast Conference women's basketball game at Cole Field House. It was the fourth straight loss for the Terps (13-12, 4-10), who led 40-33 with 14: 10 left. But the Demon Deacons (7-18, 3-11) used a 9-2 run to tie the score at 42, and Alisha Mosley's three-pointer with 2: 41 remaining put Wake Forest ahead to stay, 53-52. Maryland shot 28.1 percent (9-for-32)
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- Through much of his first season in charge of Maryland football, Ron Vanderlinden has said the record didn't reflect the level of his team's play.He's right. The Terps are fortunate to be 2-5.For the second straight season, Maryland made history against Wake Forest, but it wasn't seeking this line in the record book. The Demon Deacons whipped the Terps, 35-17, yesterday. A year ago today, Maryland beat Wake, 52-0, for its most lopsided win ever in the Atlantic Coast Conference.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1998
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- Chapter 1 of Navy Faces College Football Life Without Chris McCoy opened last night to mixed reviews, most of them bad.Off to an 11-point lead in the first 20 minutes of play against a seemingly bewildered Wake Forest team, the Mids stopped moving the ball almost totally and fell easy prey to sharp-shooting quarterback Brian Kuklick and bowed, 26-14.Had Kuklick not thrown three interceptions, two of them in the Navy end zone, it could have been a rout.Kuklick finished with his 12th 250-plus yard passing performance (256)
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1997
TUCSON, Ariz. -- Tim Duncan collided with "Big Continent" last night, and the impact revived Wake Forest's season of great expectations.Getting a magnificent 22-point, 22-rebound effort from their All-America center, the Demon Deacons flattened St. Mary's, 68-46, in the NCAA's West Regional at McKale Center.But it was not as simple as that.For Wake, the obstacles included St. Mary's 7-foot-3, 345-pound sophomore Brad Millard -- nicknamed "Big Continent" -- a shabby first half of guard play by the Deacons, and a crowd of 13,325 that got behind the West Coast Conference underdogs.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2002
Navy received its annual lesson in the power of Atlantic Coast Conference basketball last night at Alumni Hall. The Midshipmen played with conviction and purpose, but couldn't match Wake Forest's raw ability, shooting prowess and athleticism. Final: Wake Forest 87, Navy 65. The victory was the seventh in eight games for the 19th-ranked Demon Deacons, who are seasoned and talented and will make trouble for Duke and Maryland in the ACC. "I felt we had to hold them in the 60s to have a chance to win," said Navy coach Don DeVoe.
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