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NEWS
September 2, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the San Francisco Chronicle, which was published Tuesday.IN A classic clash of good intentions, environmentalists and public health officials are facing off in a passionate debate over whether the pesticide DDT should be banned worldwide.Environmentalists argue that DDT should be outlawed as a dangerous, long-lasting poison that is harmful to humans, lingers in the soil, accumulates in the food chain and disperses widely through water, air and in the flesh of fish and migrating birds.
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NEWS
By Joel Dunn | July 16, 2013
A little osprey chick has been the center of attention for a growing crowd of admirers this summer. It's the third chick to hatch to a pair of osprey, Tom and Audrey, who make their home on a nesting platform at the end of a dock on Kent Island. It's an osprey home like many others, with one exception: It has a hi-def video camera attached. So Tom and Audrey's busy nest-hold is being beamed out to the world via http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org , a real reality TV show. Thousands of folks check in daily to see whether Tom has brought home the fish, whether Audrey is tending the nest, and - maybe most of all - whether that little chick will survive to fly away.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | August 27, 2006
MAPHUNGWANE, Swaziland -- Men in blue coveralls and white surgical masks began their annual trek into the countryside here last week. Methodically, they sprayed one home after another with a chemical most Americans probably thought disappeared from use long ago: DDT. As villagers looked on, the workers doused inside and outside walls with a fine mist. It is a yearly effort to repel and kill mosquitoes that carry malaria - a disease that kills more than a million people a year, mostly children in sub-Saharan Africa.
EXPLORE
April 26, 2013
I think people should try to conserve water and not pollute it. Water is the primary resource people and animals need to live. Only about three percent of the water on Earth is fresh and there are about seven billion people. If we're not careful, the water could go down the drain. Everyone has seen pictures of oil and other pollutants in water, but I don't think they take them seriously. In the past, DDT was a pollutant that damaged the food chain. It kept working its way upward, starting with small animals, then getting to bigger ones.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
The peregrine falcon will be removed from the endangered species list, according to a proposal to be announced today by Bruce Babbitt, secretary of the Department of the Interior."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 26, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plans an unprecedented experiment this summer to cover 180 acres of ocean floor off Palos Verdes Peninsula, south of Los Angeles, a potentially risky effort to deal with the world's largest deposit of the pesticide DDT. The pilot project, in which tons of sand will be dropped into deep ocean water, is the first tangible step toward resolving a decades-old problem that haunts Southern California's marine...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 1997
Pollution levels have fallen at more than 100 sites along the nation's coastline, including Hog Point on the Chesapeake Bay, according to a federal program that closely monitors contaminant levels in mussels and oysters.But coastal pollution is still a major problem in many areas of the United States, with numerous shores closed to swimming and shellfishing, and some undergoing expensive cleanup programs.The study monitored 14 elements and compounds. The elements under study were arsenic, cadmium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, selenium and zinc, all of which can be harmful to humans and sea life in high concentrations.
NEWS
December 24, 2001
DDT is saving lives in South Africa, and in two dozen other tropical countries ravaged by mosquito-borne malaria. The pesticide, banned by most of the world as an environmental menace, is the most effective, economical weapon against the deadly disease that kills over 1 million people each year. In South Africa, Sun correspondent John Murphy reports, authorities are again using DDT to fight a virulent resurgence of malaria. Blue-uniformed health patrols are systematically spraying homes and buildings in affected areas to kill the infected mosquitoes that carry the disease.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- It has been 27 years since the United States banned the pesticide DDT, and the payoff is undeniable. The peregrine falcon, once pushed to the brink of extinction, came off the endangered species list this month, and the bald eagle might soon follow. Brown pelicans are flourishing in Florida. On the shores of Long Island, the ospreys are back.The United Nations is drafting a treaty that might lead to a worldwide ban on DDT. But the international negotiations, set to resume in Geneva next month, are drawing opposition from an unlikely quarter: public health professionals, who say DDT is necessary to stop the spread of malaria, a disease that kills as many as 2.7 million people each year, mostly children in poor, undeveloped countries.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 16, 2001
INGWAVUMA, South Africa - In this lush countryside bordering the Indian Ocean, malaria strikes so rarely that Hervey Williams, chief physician at Mosvold Hospital, finds it difficult to remember whether any of his nearly 50 patients are getting treatment for the disease. He scans the residents of the intensive care ward. Tuberculosis. Broken limbs. A medical textbook's worth of other ailments. Malaria? He's not sure. "Two," a nurse finally reminds him, and both patients are on the mend.
NEWS
By Nancy C. Unger | September 16, 2012
Mitt Romney wants to open up more federal lands and waters to drilling for oil and natural gas. His party is pushing, in the name of freedom and economic opportunity, to roll back a variety of environmental protections. Republicans, including U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts of Kansas, are seeking to ease pesticide regulations; some are even questioning the Environmental Protection Agency's ban on DDT, reopening a controversy that stretches back half a century. Fifty years ago this month, Rachel Carson published "Silent Spring.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | August 8, 2012
In an #AftermathRadio interview conducted by Arda Ocal (@arda_ocal) and Jimmy Korderas (@jimmykorderas), former WWE Superstar Jake "The Snake" Roberts talks about the DDT, mistakes he has made, wanting another chance in the WWE and apologizing to Vince McMahon.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
Bedbugs have turned up in hotels, offices and movie theaters recently. And while they aren't a severe health threat, they are creepy and crawly, and everyone wants to know why they have become so common — and how to avoid or get rid of them. Writing a book on household pests is environmental historian Dawn Biehler, assistant professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She's concluded that communities need to work together to eliminate bedbugs in an environmentally friendly and sustainable way. Question: How long have bedbugs been around and where do they come from?
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | July 29, 2007
Silence of the Songbirds By Bridget Stutchbury Walker & Company / 255 pages/ $24.95 In the steam swirling from your morning cup of java could be the ghosts of Baltimore orioles and other songbirds snuffed by the coffee industry. This haunting image is conjured by biologist Bridget Stutchbury in her new book, Silence of the Songbirds. And implicit in her picture is a message that people can take steps to stop worldwide declines in songbird populations. For example, you can get your caffeine from a beverage that doesn't require the clearing of tropical forests.
NEWS
May 27, 2007
No one would be less surprised than Rachel Carson to discover that on today's 100th anniversary of her birth she is still stirring controversy. Her 1962 book Silent Spring, which awakened the nation to the dangers of indiscriminate use of pesticides, brought swift retaliation from the chemical industry, including legal threats and personal demonization. Efforts to discredit her rage on. Inadvertently, though, the Oklahoma senator who blocked a proposal by Maryland lawmakers to formally honor Ms. Carson today has simply called greater attention to her role in helping Americans understand how human activity affects their surroundings.
NEWS
By Jeremy Lott and Erin Wildermuth | May 27, 2007
Today is the centenary of Rachel Carson's birth, which has been noted by many environmentalists who cherish her legacy. However, what has been little noted amid the celebrations and commemorations is the dark aspect of that legacy: that Ms. Carson's views led to the banning of pesticides at a cost of many thousands of lives worldwide. In 1948, Swiss chemist Paul Hermann Muller was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine. He was the first non-physician to win in that category - a surprise given the nature of the celebrated discovery.
NEWS
By Joel Dunn | July 16, 2013
A little osprey chick has been the center of attention for a growing crowd of admirers this summer. It's the third chick to hatch to a pair of osprey, Tom and Audrey, who make their home on a nesting platform at the end of a dock on Kent Island. It's an osprey home like many others, with one exception: It has a hi-def video camera attached. So Tom and Audrey's busy nest-hold is being beamed out to the world via http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org , a real reality TV show. Thousands of folks check in daily to see whether Tom has brought home the fish, whether Audrey is tending the nest, and - maybe most of all - whether that little chick will survive to fly away.
NEWS
September 4, 1999
THE STORY OF DDT is a tale of two worlds. The miracle pesticide of the 1930s was banned by developed nations decades ago as a health and environmental hazard. Malaria is virtually nonexistent in the West.But it is still the cheapest, most effective weapon against malaria in developing countries, where each yearsome 2.5 million people die from, and 500 million are infected by, the mosquito-transmitted disease.That division is sharply drawn in negotiations on a United Nations treaty that would ban DDT worldwide.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | April 22, 2007
SILVER SPRING -- From a chair in a sun-dappled corner of her back porch, Rachel Carson embraced the birds and flowers around her. But she also envisioned their demise. That fierce love and a sense of dread drove Carson to write Silent Spring, the cornerstone of the environmental movement, even as she battled the breast cancer that would kill her just 18 months after the book's publication in 1962. Her warnings about pesticides such as DDT galvanized a generation of activists, many of whom gathered 37 years ago today for the first Earth Day, a grassroots plea for a cleaner planet.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | August 27, 2006
MAPHUNGWANE, Swaziland -- Men in blue coveralls and white surgical masks began their annual trek into the countryside here last week. Methodically, they sprayed one home after another with a chemical most Americans probably thought disappeared from use long ago: DDT. As villagers looked on, the workers doused inside and outside walls with a fine mist. It is a yearly effort to repel and kill mosquitoes that carry malaria - a disease that kills more than a million people a year, mostly children in sub-Saharan Africa.
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