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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Jeremy Adams has two parties planned for his Federal Hill comics store this month. One will celebrate this weekend's annual convergence of the comics world on Charm City. The other will anticipate a risky, game-changing strategy that could determine the shape — and vitality — of that world for years to come. On Friday, Adams' Alliance Comics will be the scene of a party in honor of the 12th Baltimore Comic Con, a two-day comics bacchanal held this weekend at the Baltimore Convention Center, where thousands of retailers, artists and fans get to immerse themselves in everything having to do with the medium they adore.
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NEWS
By Nicholas Edler | May 1, 2014
In the new Marvel movie, "Captain America: The Winter Soldier," Captain America (Played by Chris Evans) is seen coolly riding his new Harley-Davidson on the streets of D.C. While watching this, I can only think of one thing: Where is Captain America's helmet? I am an intensive care unit nurse at the University of Maryland Medical Center, the first trauma hospital in the world. We regularly see motorcyclists survive devastating crashes if for no other reason because they were wearing a helmet.
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By KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 1, 2000
DC Comics is working on a bit of urban renewal as the new century brings a new look to two fabled comic-book cities: Metropolis and Gotham City. Superman's Metropolis has gotten a futuristic makeover: "It's the city of tomorrow as it always should have been, considering the Man of Tomorrow lives there," says Mike Carlin, executive editor of DC Comics. Batman's Gotham City, meanwhile, has been rebuilt in the wake of a devastating earthquake and a yearlong abandonment by the federal government.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
A Baltimore comic store has joined the growing public outcry over DC Comics' decision to hire a gay-marriage opponent and author to write part of the coming "Adventures of Superman" series. Joining many shops nationwide, Gorilla King Comics in Fells Point will not sell the two issues expected to be written by Orson Scott Card. "I have a lot of gay customers," says owner Ian Sayre. "I don't want someone to come in here, see that and think that's me or that anyone in the store supports his policies.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 15, 1993
Superman swooped back into town yesterday, and fans were leaping over tall magazine racks in a single bound just to get their hands on him.The Man of Steel returned to comic shops and sports card stores after publisher DC Comics resurrected him from last November's much-ballyhooed death.The death issue sold 4 million copies, and the publishers are betting Superman's return in Adventures of Superman No. 500 may be an even larger boon. DC Comics is publishing 6 million of them.Business was brisk as the issue hit shelves early yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
November 15, 2004
Harry Lampert, 88, the illustrator who created the DC Comics superhero the Flash and later became known for his instructional books on bridge, died of cancer Saturday in Boca Raton, Fla. He began drawing professionally at 16, inking cartoons at Fleischer Studios in New York for characters such as Popeye and Betty Boop. Six years later, he created the DC Comics original Flash Comics 1 in 1940, collaborating with writer Gardner Fox. The first-edition featuring the physics-defying superhero has become a classic among comic book collectors.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
A Baltimore comic store has joined the growing public outcry over DC Comics' decision to hire a gay-marriage opponent and author to write part of the coming "Adventures of Superman" series. Joining many shops nationwide, Gorilla King Comics in Fells Point will not sell the two issues expected to be written by Orson Scott Card. "I have a lot of gay customers," says owner Ian Sayre. "I don't want someone to come in here, see that and think that's me or that anyone in the store supports his policies.
NEWS
November 6, 1998
Bob Kane, 83, creator of "Batman" who watched the comic book character become an American icon, collapsed at his Los Angeles home Tuesday and was pronounced dead at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, his attorney, Jim Leonard, said yesterday. The cause of death was unknown.He created Batman for DC Comics in a single weekend in 1939. His hero is Bruce Wayne, a rich man who lacked the powers of Superman, relying instead on strength, agility, high-tech equipment and a fearsome bat mask and cowl to terrorize criminals.
NEWS
September 7, 1992
If having a baby was a ratings boon for Murphy Brown, think what killing off Superman will do for sales of DC Comics. Surely only a sinister corporate plot could explain such madness. After all, we thought Kryptonians lived forever -- especially one like Clark Kent, whose healthy habits and mild manner would seem to put him at low risk for the dire fates that claim many Earthlings.Only two years ago, the corporate executives approved another attempt at a ratings boost -- having reporter Kent finally become engaged to the ever-faithful Lois Lane.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | May 2, 1995
Superman died two years ago, but the latest comic-book news may be even more earth-shaking and, at least for some in the industry, scarier.The country's two biggest comic publishers have signed exclusive distribution deals, shifting millions of dollars in wholesale business faster than a speeding bullet.Marvel Entertainment Group Inc., the No. 1 comic company with about 30 percent of the market, fired the first shots two months ago by deciding to use a Marvel-owned distributor for all its shipments to specialty comic-book stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Jeremy Adams has two parties planned for his Federal Hill comics store this month. One will celebrate this weekend's annual convergence of the comics world on Charm City. The other will anticipate a risky, game-changing strategy that could determine the shape — and vitality — of that world for years to come. On Friday, Adams' Alliance Comics will be the scene of a party in honor of the 12th Baltimore Comic Con, a two-day comics bacchanal held this weekend at the Baltimore Convention Center, where thousands of retailers, artists and fans get to immerse themselves in everything having to do with the medium they adore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 28, 2008
When Baltimore native Bernie Wrightson, Archbishop Curley class of 1966, began illustrating comic books in the late 1960s, horror stories were just beginning to come back into vogue after more than a decade of being banned for the "danger" they posed to impressionable youngsters. It didn't take long for Wrightson to become known as a master of the genre. Along with such other artists as Neal Adams, Gray Morrow, Mike Kaluta and Alex Toth (many influenced by the great Frank Frazetta), Wrightson revived the genre, re-introducing comics readers to the delights of being freaked out by stories of vampires, werewolves and other creatures that went bump in the night.
FEATURES
By Jay A. Fernandez and John Horn and Jay A. Fernandez and John Horn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2007
Justice League of America is exactly the kind of movie Warner Bros. loves to make. Based on the classic DC Comics series, the script is filled with a dream team of recognizable superheroes - Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Flash - and could not only become its own franchise, but also could spin off individual character sequels, TV shows and merchandise. (Green Lantern Underoos, anyone?) But even a league of superheroes might not have enough special powers to repel the latest villain on Hollywood's horizon: an impending labor dispute.
FEATURES
By DAVID HILTBRAND and DAVID HILTBRAND,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 6, 2006
By almost any measure - exposure, esteem, money - writing for comic books is a big step down for authors who are enjoying success in TV, films or fiction. But try telling that to the big-name scribes - including horror-meister Stephen King, Joss Whedon (creator of TV's Buffy the Vampire Slayer) and writer/director Reggie Hudlin (House Party), now head of entertainment at BET - who are taking the plunge into the pulpy world of muscle-bound superheroes. They all think they've died and gone to heaven.
NEWS
November 15, 2004
Harry Lampert, 88, the illustrator who created the DC Comics superhero the Flash and later became known for his instructional books on bridge, died of cancer Saturday in Boca Raton, Fla. He began drawing professionally at 16, inking cartoons at Fleischer Studios in New York for characters such as Popeye and Betty Boop. Six years later, he created the DC Comics original Flash Comics 1 in 1940, collaborating with writer Gardner Fox. The first-edition featuring the physics-defying superhero has become a classic among comic book collectors.
FEATURES
By John Jurgensen and John Jurgensen,HARTFORD COURANT | April 19, 2004
Blockbuster. The word just sounds like a superhero, doesn't it? Fitting, because smashing box-office records seems like part of the mission today for the leading men of comic books. Whether it's the anti-heroics of Hellboy or The Punisher (which opened Friday) or the classic valor of Spider-Man (returning to the big screen in July), testosterone seems vital to the formula for breaking out of the comics subculture and into the mainstream. But where are the women? Stuck in wardrobe, apparently, if sneak peeks at Halle Berry's turn as Catwoman (supposedly coming this summer)
FEATURES
By Jay A. Fernandez and John Horn and Jay A. Fernandez and John Horn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2007
Justice League of America is exactly the kind of movie Warner Bros. loves to make. Based on the classic DC Comics series, the script is filled with a dream team of recognizable superheroes - Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Flash - and could not only become its own franchise, but also could spin off individual character sequels, TV shows and merchandise. (Green Lantern Underoos, anyone?) But even a league of superheroes might not have enough special powers to repel the latest villain on Hollywood's horizon: an impending labor dispute.
NEWS
By Nicholas Edler | May 1, 2014
In the new Marvel movie, "Captain America: The Winter Soldier," Captain America (Played by Chris Evans) is seen coolly riding his new Harley-Davidson on the streets of D.C. While watching this, I can only think of one thing: Where is Captain America's helmet? I am an intensive care unit nurse at the University of Maryland Medical Center, the first trauma hospital in the world. We regularly see motorcyclists survive devastating crashes if for no other reason because they were wearing a helmet.
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