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By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Mary Maushard, Andrea F. Siegel, Suzanne Loudermilk, Alisa Samuels and Anne Haddad contributed to this article | February 11, 1994
Though some students have lost weeks of school to bad weather this year, members of the state Board of Education say they will resist pressure to waive the state's mandatory 180-day school year."
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NEWS
By Jonathon Rondeau | September 4, 2014
Throughout the Baltimore City school year, student success will be measured in the traditional ways, through test scores and grades, and, for high school seniors, by whether or not they graduate. While tracking such standards is vital to understanding student achievement and progress as well as the success of our school system as a whole, another key indicator deserves far more focused attention: attendance. For students to succeed in school, they have to be in school. And not enough of Baltimore City students are attending school as much as they should.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1996
Carroll County students will spend an extra 50 minutes a day in school for two weeks, April 15-26, to make up time lost to snow and ice this winter.The Carroll Board of Education was not obligated to make up the time, but members voted 3-0 yesterday to use the county's standards rather than the state minimum as the benchmark.By county standards, the schools would have lost 46 hours at the elementary level and 52 hours at the secondary level."That's a lot of lost time, and it's difficult for me to say let's not worry about it," said Superintendent Brian Lockard.
NEWS
By Dallas Dance | August 26, 2014
Tomorrow is not just the first day of the 2014-2015 school year for 110,000 students in Baltimore County Public Schools. It's also the launch of initiatives to create opportunity-rich environments in every school, in every classroom and for every student. It has never been more important to educate students to high levels for their own individual success as well as the success of our county and nation. However, decades of data tell us that far too often being a student of color or a student from a low-income family correlates to lower academic achievement.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | May 7, 1993
BOSTON -- Racial tensions that had smoldered for a week at South Boston High School erupted into a rock-throwing, window-smashing melee that involved more than 200 teen-agers and sent two students, two police officers and Mayor Raymond Flynn to the hospital.Yesterday's early afternoon brawl, which pitted whites against blacks and all the youths against the police, raged for about 10 minutes around the school, spilling into adjacent Thomas Park.As police reinforcements poured in, students and neighborhood youths threw fists, bottles, rocks and chunks of asphalt.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
The Howard County school board approved last week a calendar for the 1997-1998 school year that will take days out of teachers' and students' spring vacations if next winter is particularly severe.The board also was told of anticipated changes in the daily opening and closing times of six elementary and two middle schools for next fall.Under the new calendar, classes will begin Aug. 25 and end June 9. The first day for teachers will be Aug. 19.The calendar calls for the first day of winter break to be Dec. 24, with students returning to school Jan. 5.Spring break will begin officially April 10, and schools will reopen April 20. Students also will be off April 9 and will have a half day of classes April 8 to allow for spring parent-teacher conferences.
NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | June 13, 1991
It's that time of the year again.In schools everywhere, students are mentally poised for the moment they can spring for the front door one last time, while teachers are fighting a good fight by trying to impart those final nuggets of knowledge.These are the long, listless, last days of school, and everybody is counting down."We're physically here, but what we're really thinking about is summer," Jeff Brooks, 13, a Cockeysville Middle School student said yesterday -- days before school lets out tomorrow.
NEWS
March 29, 1993
With the prospect that public schools may have to stay open until June 24, due to this month's rash of snow days, Carroll's parents and students are worried that the last few days of school will be a bake-in.While students are stewing in their classrooms before their summer recess, they might note that one of the reasons for the late close is that school started after Labor Day. The system also lost an extraordinary number of days due to the weather. The combination has put the system in a real bind.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | May 21, 2008
State Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick has approved a waiver that will end the Howard County public school year on a Friday instead of a Monday, county Superintendent Sydney L. Cousin announced this week. Inclement weather days used Feb. 13 and 22 were tacked onto the end of the school calendar year, moving the last day of school to June 16. Now, with the waiver approved, it is June 13. The originally scheduled ending date was June 12. The last four days of school will go as follows: June 10 will be a full day for all students, and high school exams will begin.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1996
Library books and some carpets in Waverly Elementary School must be destroyed and replaced, school officials have decided as cleanup efforts continue in the school contaminated by an unidentified mold or fungus.The value of the loss has not been determined as maintenance crews continue disinfecting school furniture and fixtures, said Anthony Fears, director of management services.The contamination, in two classrooms, the library and cafeteria, was discovered last week and has caused a delay in the start of classes for Waverly's 550 students.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
At the front door of a home near Holabird Academy in Southeast Baltimore, new city schools CEO Gregory Thornton and the Baltimore Oriole Bird mascot greeted a gaggle of young children with fresh uniforms and backpacks, all ready for the first day of school. Thornton high-fived the children, his enthusiasm matching that of the grade-schoolers. He gestured toward the Oriole Bird. "Do you know that he's my friend?" "Oriole Bird your friend?" a tiny girl asked incredulously. Inside, a woman shrieked with laughter as the girl cautiously shook the mascot's hand.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
I live in Mays Chapel North and now have an elementary school in my backyard. Come a few weeks from now and our peaceful senior development will be chaos, with school buses and screaming children ("Kamenetz is a bully; put him in his place on election day," Aug. 9). We raised our children and are mostly grandparents, so we have nothing against kids, just politicians who are power hungry and are the closest thing to dictators. Our beautiful 10-acre park was destroyed by bulldozers along with our peace and quiet.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | April 16, 2014
School districts are finding it hard to get snow day waivers from Maryland School Superintendent Lillian Lowery, who has quickly denied some five-day applications. The superintendent got permission from the state board of education last month to give school districts waivers from the law that requires schools to be in session for 180 days a year. The board said she could give districts up to five days, but Lowery said that districts would have to show they had attempted to make up some of the days lost for bad weather.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
There was plenty of excitement and jitters evident in the eyes of children as they attended the first day of school Monday. But Mamie J. Perkins, Anne Arundel County's interim schools superintendent, saw evidence of something else in some young students' eyes. "Are you still a little sleepy?" she asked students at Jones Elementary School at Severna Park, and a few sheepishly nodded yes. In several Jones classrooms, Perkins encouraged kids to go to bed early to get a strong start on day two Tuesday.
NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman | August 26, 2013
Susan Menefee and Erin Brice stood near the front door of Relay Elementary School, blinking back tears as they waited for the first day of school to begin. They weren't scared first-graders - or even the mothers of scared first-graders. Brice's twins, Sam and Mikaela, are in third grade this year. "Every year I cry," she said. Menefee's son, Sam, is in the second grade "It's just leaving your kids," she said. "I was excited yesterday, but today…. "It's scary and sad, but exciting," she said.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley wedged himself and his lunch tray between two first-graders at a table at Hillcrest Elementary School in Baltimore County and began eating pieces of banana as he struck up a conversation with the 6-year-olds. Darlene Lopez kept eating her jelly sandwich, except for the crusts, and Mazzy Dring pointed out her first-day-of-school outfit. Neither was impressed that a governor would drop by for lunch on their first day of school, but perhaps that was because neither one knew who the man with the gray hair was, nor did they know what a governor does.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | February 11, 1993
The Carroll Board of Education approved yesterday the 1993-1994 school calendar with a four-day spring break surrounding Easter but no early dismissals or half days.C. Scott Stone, the board's newest member, tried to modify the calendar to allow only two days off in the spring -- Good Friday and Easter Monday.However, other board members said they felt that spring break is important to students and staff.School will begin Sept. 7 for students and end June 17.The spring break will begin March 31 and last through April 5, the Tuesday after Easter.
NEWS
By MINDY S. MINTZ | November 12, 1992
In an old joke, a person asks, ''Will you sleep with me for a million dollars?'' The other says, ''For a million? Sure!'' The first then says, ''Will you sleep with me for $30?'' The other indignantly demands, ''What do you think I am?'' The answer: ''We've established what you are, now we're haggling over price.''The communications wizard Chris Whittle made such an offer to the Baltimore City Public Schools, and the school system bought the deal. Mr. Whittle is lending (not giving) one television set for every secondary-school classroom and two videotape machines per school in exchange for the right to air his 12-minute ''Channel One'' programs in every classroom once a day.The program includes about four minutes of what Mr. Whittle terms ''news,'' six minutes of human- interest features and two minutes of commercials.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry and The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
I hope you have child-care plans lined up because Baltimore County Public Schools said today that the last day of classes will be Friday, June 14, instead of Tuesday, June 18. More information here: http://www.bcps.org/news/articles/article3220.html
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