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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Get ready to rise an hour earlier before work on Monday morning - daylight saving time starts this weekend. Clocks will "spring forward" an hour at 2 a.m. Sunday, March 9, allowing for more apparent daylight in the evenings. Time will "fall back" to the standard on Sunday, Nov. 2. Local fire departments issued their annual reminders to check and replace smoke alarm batteries at the beginning of daylight saving time. Daylight saving time is not mandated by the U.S. government.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
With fall upon us, the length of time the sun spends above our horizons is quickly shrinking -- slipping to less than half of the day starting Friday. The northern and southern hemispheres received equal sun exposure at the autumnal equinox, which occurred Monday night. But the length of the day and night aren't exactly equal until a few days after the equinox here. In Baltimore, there is about 12 hours and 2 minutes of daylight Thursday, with sunrise shortly before 7 a.m. and sunset shortly before 7 p.m. On Friday, that time slips to about 11 hours, 59 minutes.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Sunshine is in the forecast again today. Enjoy it while it lasts. Tuesday is the last day of the year with more daylight than darkness -- by about 30 seconds. The sun rose at 6:57 a.m. and will set at about 6:58 p.m., for a total of about 12 hours and 30 seconds of daylight.  But the length of daylight is shrinking by about 2 1/2 minutes every day as we move past the autumnal equinox toward the winter solstice. On Wednesday, the sun will rise a minute later and set about two minutes earlier, with daylight for about two minutes shy of 12 hours.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
A contributing factor in the chronic sleepiness of teens is daylight saving time. When daylight saving time is in effect, if you rise at 6 a.m., it is really 5 a.m. It's no wonder they are tired. Daylight saving time is an archaic custom that is intended to fool us into moving our schedule an hour earlier. With the phasing out of incandescent lighting, it serves little useful purpose in the 21st century. Why not at least return to standard time when school begins? If we let teens sleep until the sun rises, they may not be so drowsy or cranky.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 7, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- Since last Sunday it's been darker in the mornings, but I've grown so mellow with the advancing years that it no longer infuriates me. Instead of cursing the darkness and those responsible for it, I just turn on the lights.So-called daylight saving time still seems to me basically a snare and a delusion, the equivalent of politicians legislating a longer day. It used to begin the last weekend in April, but now they've moved it up to the beginning of the month. Eventually, probably in an election year, I suppose they'll order it into effect all year round so they can boast about all the time they've saved for us.But no matter how they direct us to adjust our clocks, the sun and the big balls of dirt spinning around it in space won't pay any attention to them.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
A contributing factor in the chronic sleepiness of teens is daylight saving time. When daylight saving time is in effect, if you rise at 6 a.m., it is really 5 a.m. It's no wonder they are tired. Daylight saving time is an archaic custom that is intended to fool us into moving our schedule an hour earlier. With the phasing out of incandescent lighting, it serves little useful purpose in the 21st century. Why not at least return to standard time when school begins? If we let teens sleep until the sun rises, they may not be so drowsy or cranky.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Daylight saving time will end this weekend, when clocks "fall back" one hour to standard time, starting at 2 a.m. Sunday. That means an extra hour of sleep for many. Maryland State Fire Marshal William Barnard is recommending that residents change the batteries in their smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors at the same time that they turn back their clocks. Barnard says that having working fire alarms and carbon monoxide detectors can double a family's chances of surviving a home fire or instance of unsafe carbon monoxide levels.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Wednesday is the last day in Baltimore with more daylight hours than nighttime until spring. There will be about 12 hours, 1 minute of daylight, with sunrise at about 6:57 a.m. and sunset at 6:58 p.m. But the hours of daylight are shrinking by about 2 1/2 minutes each day. Thursday, there will be about 11 hours, 59 minutes of daylight, meaning darkness will make up a slight majority of the day. This didn't occur on the day of the autumnal equinox,...
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Adrienne Dulaj, a social worker from White Marsh, spends most of her days working in areas that she considers dangerous. Also an avid runner, Dulaj has to schedule her workouts to avoid those same neighborhoods at night. "I don't want to be in some of these areas in the day sometimes," she said. "I just don't do it if it's not the right time of day. I like to know someone is around. " With the Baltimore Running Festival and other popular fall footraces fast approaching, local runners have had to take care deciding where and when they run. Some have struggled in recent weeks as daylight has grown scarce on either side of normal business hours.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
It's expected to be a bit too cold for it to feel like spring Sunday, but one sign that warmer days are ahead is here: For the first time this year, there will be more daylight than darkness. Since Sept. 26, the time between sunrise and sunset has been less than 12 hours , or half the day. The length of daylight continued to shrink until it was about 9 hours, 24 minutes around the winter solstice. But by Sunday, it will have grown again to about 12 hours, 2 minutes between sunrise at about 7:14 a.m. and sunset at about 7:16 p.m. The milestone comes a few days before the vernal equinox on Wednesday because of differences in latitude.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Get ready to rise an hour earlier before work on Monday morning - daylight saving time starts this weekend. Clocks will "spring forward" an hour at 2 a.m. Sunday, March 9, allowing for more apparent daylight in the evenings. Time will "fall back" to the standard on Sunday, Nov. 2. Local fire departments issued their annual reminders to check and replace smoke alarm batteries at the beginning of daylight saving time. Daylight saving time is not mandated by the U.S. government.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
The fatal shooting Monday morning of a 48-year-old man in Northwest Baltimore was the sixth killing in as many days, pushing the city's homicide count to its highest level in four years. Police said the unidentified man was shot in the chest at about 11:30 a.m. in the 5200 block of Beaufort Ave. near Pimlico Race Course . Detectives and crime scene technicians were focused on an area behind a vacant home in the block. The killing, which came on the heels of a weekend that saw three homicides and a quadruple shooting at an East Baltimore barber shop, brought the number of victims this year to 224. The youngest of the weekend's victims was 20-year-old Sirreal Scott, who was shot Friday afternoon in the 2200 block of Liberty Heights Ave. in a residential area between Mondawmin Mall and Druid Hill Park.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
The shift back to Eastern Standard Time will soon mean both rush-hour commutes spent in the dark for many of us. With the one-hour shift backward, sunset will arrive before 5 p.m. by Thursday and sunrise will push past 7 a.m. by Nov. 24. The length of daylight meanwhile dips below the 10-hour mark somewhere in between the two, on Nov. 16. But don't fret; it will be early in the near year, around Jan. 7, when it will start staying light past...
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Daylight savings time ends Sunday, which means it's time to reset the clocks back an hour, and an added hour of sleep. "Fall back" officially occurs at 2 a.m. Sunday, providing an extra hour of sunlight to the morning but losing an hour of sunlight in the evening. Spring forward, or when clocks are reset an hour earlier, is not until 2 a.m. on the second Sunday of March. The only states that don't participate in daylight savings are Hawaii and Arizona, and several U.S. territories.
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Adrienne Dulaj, a social worker from White Marsh, spends most of her days working in areas that she considers dangerous. Also an avid runner, Dulaj has to schedule her workouts to avoid those same neighborhoods at night. "I don't want to be in some of these areas in the day sometimes," she said. "I just don't do it if it's not the right time of day. I like to know someone is around. " With the Baltimore Running Festival and other popular fall footraces fast approaching, local runners have had to take care deciding where and when they run. Some have struggled in recent weeks as daylight has grown scarce on either side of normal business hours.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Wednesday is the last day in Baltimore with more daylight hours than nighttime until spring. There will be about 12 hours, 1 minute of daylight, with sunrise at about 6:57 a.m. and sunset at 6:58 p.m. But the hours of daylight are shrinking by about 2 1/2 minutes each day. Thursday, there will be about 11 hours, 59 minutes of daylight, meaning darkness will make up a slight majority of the day. This didn't occur on the day of the autumnal equinox,...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
The shift back to Eastern Standard Time will soon mean both rush-hour commutes spent in the dark for many of us. With the one-hour shift backward, sunset will arrive before 5 p.m. by Thursday and sunrise will push past 7 a.m. by Nov. 24. The length of daylight meanwhile dips below the 10-hour mark somewhere in between the two, on Nov. 16. But don't fret; it will be early in the near year, around Jan. 7, when it will start staying light past...
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | February 14, 2007
Will your computer be ready when daylight-saving time comes? In case you didn't know, that will happen three weeks earlier this year, thanks to congressional fiat. Congress approved the change in daylight-saving time two years ago, to improve energy efficiency. Instead of starting on the first Sunday in April, as it had, this year it will start March 11, the second Sunday in March. The change is based on the belief that with one more month of "longer" days and more sunlight during waking hours, consumers will use less energy.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 23, 2013
Lisa Meagher had a full house in Roland Park in the early afternoon of July 18, with people visiting from out of town, a plumber working in the basement, and the family dog in the front yard. The possibility of a home invasion was the farthest thing from her mind. But when they locked the dog in the back yard and left the house on Woodlawn Road for awhile, the last person to leave forgot to set the alarm. While they were gone, burglars apparently used a crowbar to pry open the front door.
NEWS
July 21, 2013
When temperatures sizzled last week, life did not slow down in Roland Park. Activity proceeded, some constructive, some not. In the department of the unconstructive, daytime robberies in Roland Park were reported. Emails and Facebook postings gave news of two break-ins on Wednesday, July 17. According to one email, a Woodlawn Road house was robbed after 1:15 p.m.  The son of the owners came home about 2:45 p.m. and found the front door ajar. It had been pried open with a crowbar.
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