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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
As late morning rolled on along Wilkens Avenue in Southwest Baltimore, there were few obvious hints of the violence that had occurred just hours earlier. But just off the road were two large pools of blood, spilled from the body of the man police say was shot here just before daybreak. The police account is brief: at 5:23 a.m., officers were called to the 3400 block of Wilkens Ave. where they found a man who had been shot in the chest. He was transported to an area hospital — it doesn't say whether it was St. Agnes Hospital, which overlooks the street — and died of his wounds.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
As late morning rolled on along Wilkens Avenue in Southwest Baltimore, there were few obvious hints of the violence that had occurred just hours earlier. But just off the road were two large pools of blood, spilled from the body of the man police say was shot here just before daybreak. The police account is brief: at 5:23 a.m., officers were called to the 3400 block of Wilkens Ave. where they found a man who had been shot in the chest. He was transported to an area hospital — it doesn't say whether it was St. Agnes Hospital, which overlooks the street — and died of his wounds.
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NEWS
February 21, 2001
Last week we asked you for the name of Granddaddy's horse. Thanks go out to Alison French of Riderwood Elementary School. She wrote us the correct answer: Daybreak. Teachers: For stance questions related to this and other Just for Kids' stories, check out www.sunspot.net / nie tomorrow!
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | March 27, 2014
Only 82 days after playing North Dakota State in the NCAA Football Championship Subdivision national championship game, coach Rob Ambrose and Towson will open their spring practice season today at Johnny Unitas Stadium at 5:30 a.m. This marks the fourth consecutive year that the Tigers will stage their practice sessions in the early morning. "I truly believe that the early-morning practice sessions helped us during our playoff run last season," said Ambrose, who is starting his sixth season as Towson's head coach.
NEWS
March 2, 2003
On February 18, 2003, DR. ROBERT C. MINTEL; beloved father of Venessa Mintel and Jason Mintel; loving grandfather of Gage Mintel; longtime companion to Kim Noelle Moyer. Memorial Services to be held on Saturday, March 8, at Claret Hall, 6020 Daybreak Circle, Clarksville, MD 21209, at 1:30 P.M.
FEATURES
By Amanda Smear and Amanda Smear,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2003
With Daybreak, a new daily newsmagazine that features as its host Baltimore journalist and political activist Anthony McCarthy, WEAA (88.9 FM) hopes to fill what the station sees as a void in local morning radio. "There was no newsmagazine that discussed issues from an African-American perspective in this market," says WEAA general manager Maxie C. Jackson III. Furthering the Morgan State University-owned station's mission of "educating African-Americans," Daybreak will be a daily forum for topics from the economy to local politics to sports.
NEWS
October 15, 1991
The body of a woman believed to be in her mid 20s was found after daybreak today in the rear yard of a house in the 2500 block of Francis St. near Druid Hill Park.Investigators said they received a call about 7:30 a.m. after a passer-by walking through the alley discovered the body.Police said the woman's clothes were in disarray, and there was trauma to her head and neck.The body bore no identification. It was sent to the state medical examiner's office for an autopsy to establish the cause of death and an identification.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 2004
I've heard that people who run in the mornings are more likely to stick with it than those who run later in the day. Is there any disadvantage to running first thing? Yes, there are a few. It's true that the earlier you run the less likely you are to abandon your exercise plan, but morning joggers face their own set of problems. Flexibility, strength and body temperature are at their lowest first thing in the morning, so the risk of injury is greater. A thorough warm-up is essential for those who exercise at dawn.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1996
Two people were killed and third severely injured when a car traveling east in the westbound lanes of Interstate 70 early yesterday struck another car head-on, state police said.The wreck occurred about 3 a.m. a mile or so west of Route 32 in West Friendship in Howard County when Arthur James, 61, of the 9700 block of Branch Leigh Road in Randallstown drove his 1995 Lincoln Town Car in the wrong direction and struck a 1990 Geo Prism heading west, according to Cpl. Michael Powell of the state police barracks in Waterloo.
NEWS
October 14, 2005
MS. BERTHA H. GINN, 78, died of pulmonary fibrosis on October 12, 2005. Wife of the late William V. Marck, Jr. Born September 27, 1927 in Parkville to the late Lola and Charles Inners. She lived in Perry Hall for 50 years then later a resident of Vindabona Nursing Home & a participant of Daybreak Adult Day Care in Frederick. She was employed at Holiday Inn-Cromwell Bridge and The Days Inn-Towson. She is survived by two daughters Kathryn Fair and husband William of Az., Sheila Weidel and husband Richard of Frederick, two sons William Marck III and wife Donna of Joppatowne and John Ginn of N.J. She is also survived by eight grandchildren Nicole Rush and husband William of Fl., Lisa Koerner and husband Mike of PA, Jason Essel and wife Kate of Frederick, Brooke, Will and Kelsey Marck of Joppatowne, Wendy Fitzgerald of Fl. and Chris Weidel of De; Two great-grandchildren Elizabeth and William Rush of Fl; one brother Alfred Inners and wife Phyllis of Al; one sister-in-law Leila Bozel of Towson.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
If you had asked the Europeans a week ago, they could have told you a truckload of snow was headed for Baltimore on Thursday. The Canadians came around soon afterward. It took the Americans until just a few days ago to get a whiff of a winter storm. But as quickly as weather forecasting models developed by each can converge, they can shift, pulling the rug from underneath meteorologists who had warned of a possibility of more or less snow than what might actually fall. By late Tuesday, the consensus was that six to 10 inches of snow could be expected across the region, with the heaviest precipitation falling through daybreak Thursday.
FEATURES
Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Meet Marty Cohen and his group of early-morning cyclists, who get their dose of cardio by riding through northwestern Baltimore county. Type of workout: They're riding bikes, so they get a cardio workout and use the muscles in their lower body (quadriceps, hamstrings and calf) and core (abdominals and back). Who's in the group: Two to three men, ages 60 and over. How often they ride: Monday, Wednesday and Fridays at 5:30 a.m. year round, and Sundays in the summer months.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers | January 8, 2010
Everything that's good about "Daybreakers" bursts forth in the scene wherein a hematologist played by Ethan Hawke undertakes an experiment and injects a not-quite-FDA-approved synthetic liquid into the veins of a fellow vampire, under the watchful eye of a pharmaceutical magnate played by Sam Neill. From the scene's relative placement early in the story, and the familiarity of its premise, it's clear the operation will fail in the most spectacular way possible. The setup goes back a lot further than "Independence Day" or "The Thing" (either version)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Roger Moore and Tribune newspapers | January 7, 2010
No actor wants to look foolish, especially if there are a couple of Oscar nominations and a Tony nomination on his resume. And the time you worry about that, says Ethan Hawke, is "when you're sitting there, covered in fake blood, or somebody's handing you a bottle of blood that they're treating like a vintage wine." Whatever the requirements of the scene, which had him wearing fangs and playing a vampire hematologist, Hawke couldn't help having his moment of doubt. " 'God, I hope this movie's good,' I'm thinking.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
The robberies were methodical, the victims elderly. Kent D. Tillman would hang around banks and watch senior citizens make cash withdrawals before following them home, prosecutors said. Once there, they said, he would knock them to the ground, take their valuables and flee. Tillman, 20, who was charged with two such robberies, was sentenced yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court to a 15-year prison term, with all but seven years suspended. His lawyer, Donna M. Coleman, had asked Judge H. Patrick Stringer earlier in the hearing to consider leniency, given that Tillman did not appear to have used a weapon in the robberies.
NEWS
October 14, 2005
MS. BERTHA H. GINN, 78, died of pulmonary fibrosis on October 12, 2005. Wife of the late William V. Marck, Jr. Born September 27, 1927 in Parkville to the late Lola and Charles Inners. She lived in Perry Hall for 50 years then later a resident of Vindabona Nursing Home & a participant of Daybreak Adult Day Care in Frederick. She was employed at Holiday Inn-Cromwell Bridge and The Days Inn-Towson. She is survived by two daughters Kathryn Fair and husband William of Az., Sheila Weidel and husband Richard of Frederick, two sons William Marck III and wife Donna of Joppatowne and John Ginn of N.J. She is also survived by eight grandchildren Nicole Rush and husband William of Fl., Lisa Koerner and husband Mike of PA, Jason Essel and wife Kate of Frederick, Brooke, Will and Kelsey Marck of Joppatowne, Wendy Fitzgerald of Fl. and Chris Weidel of De; Two great-grandchildren Elizabeth and William Rush of Fl; one brother Alfred Inners and wife Phyllis of Al; one sister-in-law Leila Bozel of Towson.
NEWS
By Monalisa Degross | February 14, 2001
Editor's note: One family recounts its part in Baltimore's a-rab tradition. "Granddaddy," I say, "Tell me a story about long ago, when things weren't' like they are today." "I recall the summer of nineteen hundred and fifty-five," Granddaddy begins with a smile and twirls the ends of his mustache. "Wait just one minute!" I say, stopping him so I can run and get what we need for a good, long story. "Easy now," Granddaddy warns as I pull the blue leather photo album from the shelf and bring it to him. I slide the big book on his lap and watch as Granddaddy wipes the cover with his sleeve.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
The robberies were methodical, the victims elderly. Kent D. Tillman would hang around banks and watch senior citizens make cash withdrawals before following them home, prosecutors said. Once there, they said, he would knock them to the ground, take their valuables and flee. Tillman, 20, who was charged with two such robberies, was sentenced yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court to a 15-year prison term, with all but seven years suspended. His lawyer, Donna M. Coleman, had asked Judge H. Patrick Stringer earlier in the hearing to consider leniency, given that Tillman did not appear to have used a weapon in the robberies.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2005
It's 4:30 a.m., and the Maryland Wholesale Seafood Market in Jessup is awash in activity. A hundred miles from the Atlantic Ocean, the smell of saltwater fills the air. Mounds of fresh fish - salmon, tuna, glistening red snapper - lie on beds of ice in the chill, dimly lit warehouse. Soft-shell crabs, hauled from the Chesapeake Bay hours before, wriggle in wooden boxes lined with newspaper. Amid the din of forklifts and hand trucks, warehouse workers in orange rubber suits patrol the loading docks, handling tons of fresh catch bound for seafood markets and restaurants throughout the Mid-Atlantic.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 13, 2005
MEULABOH, Indonesia -- Amid the haunting reminders of loss here along the coast of north Sumatra, reminders of life are reappearing too. Survivors are beginning to contemplate rebuilding houses and businesses, a subdued nightlife is returning and students are back in school. On the first day of classes in Calang, there were no lessons, just the recording of names and the organizing of students according to grade level. No one had an accurate counting of how many students and teachers from the local schools were alive or dead.
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