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SPORTS
February 2, 2000
A sampling of what people are saying about Ray Lewis' arrest: "My heart goes out to Ray Lewis and his family, first of all. What has happened is unbelievable. I hope that it's not true, and we must go on." -- Junior Seau, San Diego Chargers linebacker "We've had a tough year as it goes anyway with the Rae Carruth situation. We certainly, for his own good, hope that it's not true, and for the good of the NFL." -- Gene Washington, NFL director of football development "[NFL commissioner Paul]
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BUSINESS
By Walter Hamilton and Walter Hamilton,Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2007
As stocks soared in the 1990s, countless Wall Street wannabes became "day traders," quitting their jobs and trying to make their living by trading stocks at a furious pace. When the boom ended, so did the day-trading craze. But rising stock prices and new highs in major stock indexes have tickled investor interest, and aggressive trading by individuals is on its way back. "There's no other way to live," said Robert Earl, a 52-year-old Long Beach, Calif., man who began trading full time in 2004.
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NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
The bull market and the Internet can take credit for spawning the day trading industry.Day traders are investors, sometimes professionals but more often than not amateurs, who use their own money to execute their own trades. It is a risky, pressure-packed world where every second and every penny count.When the stock market's opening bell rings at 9: 30 a.m., a day trader owns nothing. The strategy is to buy a stock with the hopes that it will jump quickly, sell it for a small profit, then move on to other stocks.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 16, 2005
NEW YORK - Four former stockbrokers at major securities firms were accused yesterday of accepting bribes from day traders who wanted to eavesdrop on customer order information to make easy profits. In separate actions, the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission contended that day traders paid thousands of dollars to the four brokers - who worked at Citigroup, Lehman Brothers and Merrill Lynch - for access to their so-called squawk box intercoms, which broadcast their biggest customers' stock orders.
NEWS
August 12, 1999
DAY TRADING can be harmful to your financial health. That's the verdict of the North American Securities Administrators Association, which just completed a seven-month study of day-trading accounts.The state securities regulators want tighter restrictions on day trading companies, particularly on advertising and marketing that emphasizes quick riches. That's a fine idea.The NASAA study comes on the heels of Atlanta day trader Mark O. Barton's deadly shooting spree, which left 13 dead. Police believe large day-trading losses may have contributed to Barton's rampage.
BUSINESS
By Walter Hamilton and Walter Hamilton,Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2007
As stocks soared in the 1990s, countless Wall Street wannabes became "day traders," quitting their jobs and trying to make their living by trading stocks at a furious pace. When the boom ended, so did the day-trading craze. But rising stock prices and new highs in major stock indexes have tickled investor interest, and aggressive trading by individuals is on its way back. "There's no other way to live," said Robert Earl, a 52-year-old Long Beach, Calif., man who began trading full time in 2004.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 16, 2005
NEW YORK - Four former stockbrokers at major securities firms were accused yesterday of accepting bribes from day traders who wanted to eavesdrop on customer order information to make easy profits. In separate actions, the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission contended that day traders paid thousands of dollars to the four brokers - who worked at Citigroup, Lehman Brothers and Merrill Lynch - for access to their so-called squawk box intercoms, which broadcast their biggest customers' stock orders.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 30, 1999
ATLANTA -- A securities day trader killed nine people yesterday afternoon in two office buildings in the city's upscale Buckhead district, eluded an extensive police manhunt for five hours, then killed himself in his van after the police pulled him over in nearby Cobb County.Twelve other people were injured in the incidents, seven of them from gunshot wounds.The man, Mark O. Barton, 44, also is suspected in the killings of his wife and two children from an earlier marriage, whose bodies were found yesterday in an apartment in suburban Stockbridge, about 15 miles southeast of Atlanta.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 2001
At the beginning of this year, I quit my engineering job and began day-trading stocks full time. I lost more than $65,000. All my trades were short term, held for no more than a day. I am married and have been filing joint returns for 20 years. My wife has an income of about $120,000. Can we deduct my $65,000 loss as ordinary income? If I can, what form is needed? Thank you for your early reply. You're still married, huh? Will wonders never cease! You can deduct your losses - but only $3,000 a year.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1999
In the 1600s, the Dutch literally speculated themselves into economic ruin over -- please don't laugh -- tulips.Tulip Mania wasn't the first speculative bubble the world had seen, nor would it be the last. But the flowering inferno was the first capitalist frenzy to be well-chronicled. To this day, the great tulip bubble is invoked by financial gloom-and-doomers whenever euphoric speculators seeking endless riches embrace the belief that their investments can only rise in value -- and never fall.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 2001
At the beginning of this year, I quit my engineering job and began day-trading stocks full time. I lost more than $65,000. All my trades were short term, held for no more than a day. I am married and have been filing joint returns for 20 years. My wife has an income of about $120,000. Can we deduct my $65,000 loss as ordinary income? If I can, what form is needed? Thank you for your early reply. You're still married, huh? Will wonders never cease! You can deduct your losses - but only $3,000 a year.
SPORTS
February 2, 2000
A sampling of what people are saying about Ray Lewis' arrest: "My heart goes out to Ray Lewis and his family, first of all. What has happened is unbelievable. I hope that it's not true, and we must go on." -- Junior Seau, San Diego Chargers linebacker "We've had a tough year as it goes anyway with the Rae Carruth situation. We certainly, for his own good, hope that it's not true, and for the good of the NFL." -- Gene Washington, NFL director of football development "[NFL commissioner Paul]
NEWS
August 12, 1999
DAY TRADING can be harmful to your financial health. That's the verdict of the North American Securities Administrators Association, which just completed a seven-month study of day-trading accounts.The state securities regulators want tighter restrictions on day trading companies, particularly on advertising and marketing that emphasizes quick riches. That's a fine idea.The NASAA study comes on the heels of Atlanta day trader Mark O. Barton's deadly shooting spree, which left 13 dead. Police believe large day-trading losses may have contributed to Barton's rampage.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
The bull market and the Internet can take credit for spawning the day trading industry.Day traders are investors, sometimes professionals but more often than not amateurs, who use their own money to execute their own trades. It is a risky, pressure-packed world where every second and every penny count.When the stock market's opening bell rings at 9: 30 a.m., a day trader owns nothing. The strategy is to buy a stock with the hopes that it will jump quickly, sell it for a small profit, then move on to other stocks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 30, 1999
ATLANTA -- A securities day trader killed nine people yesterday afternoon in two office buildings in the city's upscale Buckhead district, eluded an extensive police manhunt for five hours, then killed himself in his van after the police pulled him over in nearby Cobb County.Twelve other people were injured in the incidents, seven of them from gunshot wounds.The man, Mark O. Barton, 44, also is suspected in the killings of his wife and two children from an earlier marriage, whose bodies were found yesterday in an apartment in suburban Stockbridge, about 15 miles southeast of Atlanta.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1999
In the 1600s, the Dutch literally speculated themselves into economic ruin over -- please don't laugh -- tulips.Tulip Mania wasn't the first speculative bubble the world had seen, nor would it be the last. But the flowering inferno was the first capitalist frenzy to be well-chronicled. To this day, the great tulip bubble is invoked by financial gloom-and-doomers whenever euphoric speculators seeking endless riches embrace the belief that their investments can only rise in value -- and never fall.
SPORTS
October 8, 1999
Errict Rhett was ahead of his time in the frenetic world of high finance, squeezing a nice profit from the newest innovation.In the bottom-line business of football, he was running late, buried under a cloud of innuendo and suspicion.This season, football caught up to finance for the Ravens' running back. A free agent as recently as last April, a special- and scout-teamer as recently as Week 1, Rhett leads the AFC in rushing one-quarter of the way through the season with 350 loud yards.His football stock, almost worthless a month ago, is soaring, just as it did when he posted back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 1994-1995.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 4, 1999
IF YOU are considering jumping into day trading, Alpesh Patel, a day trader himself, suggests that you first answer these questions: Can you spend three hours a day evaluating data to trade effectively?Can you afford to commit $5,000 to open an account?Do you have the temperament to engage in something so volatile?"Even successful day traders lose money in bad markets, so only try your hand at day trading if you can tolerate high risk and stress," Patel advises.MARKET WATCH:"Crossing of 10,000 by the Dow average was important, not because one index reached a big, fat round number, but because stocks climbed so much recently -- and so much of the advance was in a tiny number of stocks -- mostly large growth issues," notes Bradlee Perry of David L. Babson & Co. Inc."
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