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By Elsbeth L. Bothe and Elsbeth L. Bothe,Special to the Sun | April 27, 2003
The Majesty of the Law: Reflections of a Supreme Court Justice, by Sandra Day O'Connor. Random House. 336 pages. $25.95. Justice Sandra Day O'Connor is an extremely powerful person. Her swing vote on the Rehnquist court pendulum -- often stuck on the right -- hit its heights when she cast a crucial vote for the man who has the power to determine her future colleagues, to say nothing of the prospects for world peace. Without her in favor, women might not be able to get legal abortions or municipalities fund parochial education, and three-time losers might not have to serve inordinate time.
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NEWS
June 19, 2006
For those who think it doesn't matter who sits in the White House, a close ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court last week is a sharp reminder of how that bench is affected by presidential politics. The 5-4 decision allowing the admission of evidence even though it was conceded that police had violated the defendant's constitutional rights was supported by President Bush's two appointees, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. The ruling poses a threat to the right of privacy and to accepted ways to wipe the slate clean when it is violated in criminal cases.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2005
The surprise retirement of Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor - considered a key vote in keeping abortion widely legal in the United States - throws into question the future of the procedure's availability and re-ignites a long-simmering and emotionally charged debate. In losing O'Connor, the moderate voice who created the current legal standard that restrictions on abortion should not place an "undue burden" on women, the stage is set for someone cut from more conservative cloth to take her place.
NEWS
By RICHARD A. SERRANO and RICHARD A. SERRANO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- With no fanfare, the Supreme Court granted a last-minute reprieve this past summer to a man who has spent 17 years on death row in Pennsylvania. Convicted of fatally stabbing a tavern owner and setting him on fire, Ronald Rompilla had run out of appeals when the Supreme Court stepped in. By the narrowest of margins - 5-4 - the court vacated his death penalty and returned the case for resentencing. It marked the third time since 2000 that a loose coalition of liberal and swing-vote justices has struck down death-penalty cases because of poor work by defense lawyers.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - On a quiet, muggy, pre-holiday Friday morning, word of a Supreme Court retirement finally arrived - and with a stunning twist. This was the Big One, the departure of Sandra Day O'Connor, the first female justice and the pivotal jurist on a closely divided court. The aftershocks from her announcement will be felt far into the future, in the realms of law, politics and, quite conceivably, American culture. Most immediately, her resignation sharply raises the stakes - and ferocity - of a much-anticipated clash over the court's direction, legal scholars and political analysts said yesterday.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2005
As a woman entering the University of Baltimore Law School in 1981, Mary Buonanno sorely felt the need for female guidance. She and other women in the class were reduced to watching TV legal dramas to see what female lawyers, still a cultural novelty, wore to court. "Women were still an oddity in the law," said Buonanno, a Takoma Park attorney who recently finished her tenure as president of the Women's Bar Association of Maryland. "We were still figuring out what we could wear in the courtroom."
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - The news President Bush had been anticipating since he took office more than four years ago came during lunch, shrouded in secrecy. The Supreme Court had a sealed envelope to deliver to the White House, Bush was told over lunch with Vice President Dick Cheney in the president's private dining room Thursday. No word on whom it was from. But there was little mystery about what it would say. Bush knew then that he was about to get his long-awaited chance to make a Supreme Court nomination - the first in more than a decade - and to put his stamp on the judiciary, cementing a central element of his legacy.
NEWS
June 19, 2006
For those who think it doesn't matter who sits in the White House, a close ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court last week is a sharp reminder of how that bench is affected by presidential politics. The 5-4 decision allowing the admission of evidence even though it was conceded that police had violated the defendant's constitutional rights was supported by President Bush's two appointees, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. The ruling poses a threat to the right of privacy and to accepted ways to wipe the slate clean when it is violated in criminal cases.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | June 26, 1993
It was a beautiful day to christen a sailboat, a perfect, breezy Annapolis day, with a Supreme Court justice and the ambassador from New Zealand in attendance at the ceremony at the Naval Academy. The only thing missing was the boat.Nance Frank and her all-female crew of 12 had been 60 miles off the Florida Keys a week ago training for the 33,000-mile Whitbread Round the World Race, one of the most grueling in yachting circles, when part of the mast of their 64-foot craft broke.They repaired it in Fort Lauderdale, but realized that they would not be able to sail to Annapolis in time for the christening ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and By Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | February 3, 2002
Lazy B: Growing Up on a Cattle Ranch in the American Southwest, by Sandra Day O'Connor and H. Alan Day. Random House. 318 pages. $24.95. The story of how a girl can grow up among cowboys, coyotes and rattlesnakes on a real-life Ponderosa in the bone-dry Southwest to become the first female justice of the U.S. Supreme Court has all the elements necessary for an inspiring, only-in-America memoir. It's a shame that Sandra Day O'Connor booted this wonderful opportunity to tell it. There's much to admire about Lazy B, a collection of profiles and anecdotes from O'Connor's childhood, spent mostly on the family's 160,000-acre cattle ranch that straddled the high desert land between Arizona and New Mexico.
NEWS
October 5, 2005
Federalism will foment more division in Iraq In "Referendum holds future" (Opinion * Commentary, Oct. 2), Barry Rubin argues that Iraq's future as a stable, democratic state would be secured by the adoption and implementation of the draft constitution. Unfortunately, Mr. Rubin's argument ignores substantial evidence suggesting that the nature of Iraq's proposed constitutional arrangement is, in fact, a recipe for instability and violence. Specifically, Mr. Rubin believes that the form of decentralized federalism proposed in the constitution would contribute to stability in Iraq.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2005
Retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor praised Judge John G. Roberts Jr. to a reporter in Idaho soon after his selection as the president's choice to fill her seat on the Supreme Court was made public, noting, "He's good in every way, except he's not a woman." To many women, the sight of another white male receiving a lifetime appointment to the most influential court in the nation sends an upsetting message: Despite huge gains in the legal profession, where women make up 30 percent of the bar and more than 50 percent of law school classes, there are still limits, many said.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | July 7, 2005
MY REACTION TO Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's retirement was almost as positive as my reaction was negative in 1981 when the Reagan administration announced that it was going to appoint a woman to the Supreme Court. It wouldn't matter if all nine justices of the Supreme Court were women, if these were the nine best people available. But to decide in advance that you were going to appoint a woman and then look only among women for a nominee was a dangerous gamble with a court that has become dangerous enough otherwise.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - The news President Bush had been anticipating since he took office more than four years ago came during lunch, shrouded in secrecy. The Supreme Court had a sealed envelope to deliver to the White House, Bush was told over lunch with Vice President Dick Cheney in the president's private dining room Thursday. No word on whom it was from. But there was little mystery about what it would say. Bush knew then that he was about to get his long-awaited chance to make a Supreme Court nomination - the first in more than a decade - and to put his stamp on the judiciary, cementing a central element of his legacy.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - On a quiet, muggy, pre-holiday Friday morning, word of a Supreme Court retirement finally arrived - and with a stunning twist. This was the Big One, the departure of Sandra Day O'Connor, the first female justice and the pivotal jurist on a closely divided court. The aftershocks from her announcement will be felt far into the future, in the realms of law, politics and, quite conceivably, American culture. Most immediately, her resignation sharply raises the stakes - and ferocity - of a much-anticipated clash over the court's direction, legal scholars and political analysts said yesterday.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2005
The surprise retirement of Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor - considered a key vote in keeping abortion widely legal in the United States - throws into question the future of the procedure's availability and re-ignites a long-simmering and emotionally charged debate. In losing O'Connor, the moderate voice who created the current legal standard that restrictions on abortion should not place an "undue burden" on women, the stage is set for someone cut from more conservative cloth to take her place.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2005
Retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor praised Judge John G. Roberts Jr. to a reporter in Idaho soon after his selection as the president's choice to fill her seat on the Supreme Court was made public, noting, "He's good in every way, except he's not a woman." To many women, the sight of another white male receiving a lifetime appointment to the most influential court in the nation sends an upsetting message: Despite huge gains in the legal profession, where women make up 30 percent of the bar and more than 50 percent of law school classes, there are still limits, many said.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | July 7, 2005
MY REACTION TO Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's retirement was almost as positive as my reaction was negative in 1981 when the Reagan administration announced that it was going to appoint a woman to the Supreme Court. It wouldn't matter if all nine justices of the Supreme Court were women, if these were the nine best people available. But to decide in advance that you were going to appoint a woman and then look only among women for a nominee was a dangerous gamble with a court that has become dangerous enough otherwise.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - The retirement of Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor drew a round of accolades from all sides yesterday - and set the stage for what could be a transforming battle over the future of the nation's highest court. Inside the Capitol, where a sleepy Friday turned frenzied by midmorning, Republicans and Democrats alike praised the "cowgirl from Arizona" as a unique jurist who reshaped the court around her during the nearly 25 years she has served. But as they lauded O'Connor, lawmakers were girding for a debate over her replacement, which will dominate the Senate all summer and test the fragile truce reached a few weeks ago on judicial nominations.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2005
As a woman entering the University of Baltimore Law School in 1981, Mary Buonanno sorely felt the need for female guidance. She and other women in the class were reduced to watching TV legal dramas to see what female lawyers, still a cultural novelty, wore to court. "Women were still an oddity in the law," said Buonanno, a Takoma Park attorney who recently finished her tenure as president of the Women's Bar Association of Maryland. "We were still figuring out what we could wear in the courtroom."
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