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By MIKE LITTWIN | November 10, 1993
Sandra Day O'Connor, a woman, wrote the opinion. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, also a woman, had led the questioning of the lawyers and offered a concurring opinion.And the Supreme Court ruling yesterday was unanimous, meaning that even Clarence "Can o' Coke" Thomas joined in.Yes, it's a new day.On this new day, the Supreme Court set a new, and more lenient, standard for determining sexual harassment in the workplace. The court said, in effect, that women should not have to put up with scummy male bosses.
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Dan Rodricks | July 19, 2014
Levi Watkins, the pioneering cardiac surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, remembers the date — January 15 — because it was the anniversary of the birth of Martin Luther King Jr., and because what happened that night still makes him ache. It was 1979, and Watkins, the first black chief resident in cardiac surgery at Hopkins, had just left his office after conferring with a senior medical student named Alan Trimakas. They had agreed on the subject of a research project — cardiac neoplasms, tumors of the heart or heart valves.
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By New York Daily News | May 13, 1994
In her first public statement since filing a sexual harassment suit against President Clinton last week, a defiant Paula Jones declared this week: "He needs his day in court and I need my day in court."Ms. Jones, 27, said in an exclusive interview on Wednesday that she had no regrets about suing the president, but admitted that she sometimes fears for her life.Asked if she was scared about taking on the world's most powerful man, the petite woman, clad in a blue jogging suit, said: "No, because I know I'm telling the truth -- I am telling the truth."
NEWS
April 17, 2014
President Barack Obama has come under fire from Hispanic groups who say he hasn't done enough to enact comprehensive immigration reform and that his administration has deported record numbers of undocumented immigrants. Neither charge is wholly justified: Mr. Obama's pleas to House Republican leaders to take up an immigration bill passed by the Senate last year have been met with stony indifference, and though the total number of deportations on his watch has been higher than under previous presidents, they have been declining rapidly in recent years.
NEWS
May 28, 1997
INDIVIDUAL PRESIDENTS rise and fall with the whims of the electorate. But the office of the presidency remains a constant and crucial force in the smooth operation of the federal government. Even so, the Supreme Court has now ruled unanimously that the duties of that high office do not shield the officeholder from lawsuits having to do with his private, unofficial conduct.Paula Jones, the woman who claims then Gov. Bill Clinton exposed himself and propositioned her in an Arkansas hotel room six years ago, has demanded her day in court to clear her reputation.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff Jay Merwin contributed to this story | August 19, 1991
After languishing in jail without a trial for more than five months on a charge of violating probation, Robert Seymour was to get his day in court today.Seymour has been held in the Baltimore city jail since March after being arrested for violating his probation on traffic charges, according to Leonard A. Sipes Jr., a jail spokesman.District Court officials scheduled four trial dates for Seymour since March but jail officials never brought him to court, Sipes said.The mix-up apparently happened because the court and the jail were using different first and middle names for Seymour, although his last name was always correct, Sipes said.
NEWS
By Norris West | October 17, 1999
ANNAPOLIS CITY leaders, who whined about footing the bill for a New Year's Eve celebration expenses, apparently aren't so tight with a buck when it comes to a potentially costly day in court.The city was ready to let Annapolis First Night proceed without its participation and on city-owned properties because it didn't want to absorb the cost of police overtime and cleanup. Fortunately, Annapolis-based USinternetworking Inc. bailed out the city by agreeing to kick in $18,000 for the annual celebration.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1999
After nearly two years of critical newspaper reports, criminal investigations and charges that he betrayed his public position for personal gain, former state Sen. Larry Young is about to receive his long-repeated request: his day in court.Tomorrow, Young will go on trial in Anne Arundel County on charges of using his post as an legislator influential in health-care matters to receive more than $72,000 in payments from the owner of a company seeking to become a licensed health-care company in Maryland.
NEWS
May 11, 2000
This morning, in the Elbert P. Tuttle Court of Appeals Building in downtown Atlanta, another chapter opens in the legal saga of 6-year-old Elian Gonzalez. A court hearing on the fate of the motherless Cuban boy found floating alone at sea almost six months ago could be the decisive stage. The Sun's Supreme Court reporter, Lyle Denniston, explores what is at stake. The boy's Cuban father, Juan Miguel Gonzalez, has had Elian since April 22, when he was seized from Miami relatives by federal agents.
NEWS
April 20, 2004
DONTE BRYANT, Gloria Bell and Bonnie Bunch are getting their day in court - whether they want it or not. The three Baltimore residents have been summoned to court today to explain why they shouldn't be fined or sent to jail for skipping out on jury duty this year. That may seem harsh, but there must be a consequence of citizens' failing to perform this essential civic duty. The trouble is, the city courts have neither the staff nor the time to haul all of the no-shows into court. But what if prospective jurors who failed to heed the call had their driver's license or car registration renewals flagged?
NEWS
February 25, 2014
It came as no surprise to hear that certain U.S. Supreme Court justices hold misgivings about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulating greenhouse gas emissions from power plants - and potentially other stationary sources. In arguments before the court Monday, it was apparent that even some of the liberal justices have doubts about how far the EPA's statutory authority can be pushed in this regard. But one thing was also clear, at least if one can draw conclusions based on the questions presented to the lawyers arguing Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA: A majority of the court appears content to let stand its 2007 ruling in Massachusetts v. EPA that held that the agency can consider carbon dioxide a pollutant despite its ubiquity.
NEWS
April 25, 2013
All of us were gripped into the tragedy of the Boston Marathon massacre. Our hearts were broken at the loss of lives and how so many lives were changed in an instant. We all cheered at the death of Tamerlan Tsarnaev and the brilliant capture of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. And we all breathed a sigh of relief for Boston. Yet, we cannot respond as Sens. John McCain and Lindsey Graham would like us to ("A case for civilian court," April 23). We cannot twist the law to fit our anger and grief.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
A judge on Wednesday lifted a ban prohibiting political activist Kim A. Trueheart from entering City Hall — and she promptly returned to the building, where she attended the mayor's news conference. At a District Court hearing Wednesday morning, Trueheart, 55, of Baltimore rejected a deal that would have put her misdemeanor trespassing and disorderly conduct charges on an inactive docket. Trueheart said she did nothing wrong and wanted the opportunity to be cleared of wrongdoing.
NEWS
By Lawrence A. Cunningham | March 21, 2012
If you think you will have your day in court when aggrieved by civil injustice, think again. More likely, you will be headed for a meeting run by a professional arbitrator. Ironically, the Supreme Court is to blame. It is leading a quiet transformation by moving the country from using public court trials to secret arbitration hearings. Justice in a court of law emphasizes fairness, using costly traditional practices: impartial juries, trained judges, media-saturated trials open to the public, discovery of information, published opinions explaining judicial reasoning and review by an appellate panel.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2010
For many decades, the drill for traffic stops in Maryland was clear: If you got a ticket, you were assigned a court date, whether you requested one or not. Starting Jan. 1, that changes. Motorists who want to contest a ticket will have to ask for a trial date or sentencing hearing as required by legislation passed unanimously in the General Assembly earlier this year. If they don't, they'll just have to pay the fine. Up to now, according to the Maryland Sheriffs Association, Maryland was the only state in which the recipient of a traffic citation was given an automatic court date.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
A prominent Baltimore City councilwoman is due to appear in court Monday on campaign finance violation charges, marking the start of the final chapter of the corruption investigation that led to Sheila Dixon's resignation from the mayor's office. Councilwoman Helen Holton, who represents a portion of Southwest Baltimore, was accused of exceeding campaign finance limits by asking bakery magnate John Paterakis Sr. and developer Ronald Lipscomb to pay $12,500 to fund a campaign poll during her election campaign.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 21, 1999
About a dozen legislators spent a morning in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court on Friday getting a firsthand look at the practical effect of the laws they pass.Though this was the fifth year the delegations were invited to informal talks with local judges and a whirlwind tour of court cases, it was the first time that so many of the elected officials chose to come in the weeks before the General Assembly opens."It's good to see how our acts are put into action here," said Sen. Philip C. Jimeno, a Brooklyn Park Democrat.
NEWS
September 13, 1990
Steve Lopez, a 36-year-old columnist and staff writer for the Philadelphia Inquirer, has won this year's H.L. Mencken Writing Award.The award, which includes a $2,500 prize, is presented annually by the Baltimore Sun to the newspaper writer whose column best captures the excellence of the newspaper commentary by the former Evening Sun editor and columnist.Judges said Lopez won for three columns in which he "confronts public officials head-on, reflects the irritations and anxieties of people at all levels, and arouses Philadelphians."
NEWS
March 11, 2010
At a time when record numbers of Marylanders are struggling with foreclosure, eviction or loss of health and unemployment benefits, nonprofit legal aid groups that help people pursue their rights in court are increasingly unable to do their job. Funding for legal services to the poor has plummeted as a result of the recession. Unless something is done, thousands of families and individuals will lose their ability to challenge the decisions of mortgage companies, landlords, employers and health care providers in court.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
A t a time when record numbers of Marylanders are struggling with foreclosure, eviction or loss of health and unemployment benefits, nonprofit legal aid groups that help people pursue their rights in court are increasingly unable to do their job. Funding for legal services to the poor has plummeted as a result of the recession. Unless something is done, thousands of families and individuals will lose their ability to challenge the decisions of mortgage companies, landlords, employers and health care providers in court.
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