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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 9, 2004
Thank goodness for Davy Crockett; without him, the Alamo could have proven the blandest heroic siege in movie history. Advance billing has trumpeted The Alamo as a true depiction of the battle that swayed Texans' hearts and minds toward independence - a problematic assertion, given how little really is known of what actually happened on that February morning back in 1836. All the fort's defenders died, meaning history has had to rely on legend and the accounts of the victorious Mexicans, who failed to report in detail the manner in which the rebellious Texans were killed.
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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 28, 2007
People love it for the same reason that the early pioneers couldn't sit still and had to see the world. Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone were just RVers born 200 years too soon."
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NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 28, 2007
People love it for the same reason that the early pioneers couldn't sit still and had to see the world. Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone were just RVers born 200 years too soon."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 9, 2004
Thank goodness for Davy Crockett; without him, the Alamo could have proven the blandest heroic siege in movie history. Advance billing has trumpeted The Alamo as a true depiction of the battle that swayed Texans' hearts and minds toward independence - a problematic assertion, given how little really is known of what actually happened on that February morning back in 1836. All the fort's defenders died, meaning history has had to rely on legend and the accounts of the victorious Mexicans, who failed to report in detail the manner in which the rebellious Texans were killed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 3, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas -- From coonskin caps to lunchboxes and cap pistols, Davy Crockett memorabilia has made the Alamo hero and American frontiersman the country's greatest pop culture symbol, right? It is an arguable position, but at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin, a new exhibit could sway the most ardent objector. The exhibit, Sunrise in His Pocket: The Life, Legend and Legacy of Davy Crockett, opened this weekend and will run through Aug. 18. It is a collection of bona fide Crockett artifacts, including a flintlock rifle and pages of personal letters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen R. Proctor and By Stephen R. Proctor,Sun Staff | January 14, 2001
"A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory," by Randy Roberts and James N. Olson. The Free Press. 352 pages. $26. No event in U.S. history has been more mythologized than the battle of the Alamo. Disney's Davy Crockett trilogy was, after all, the granddaddy of movies with merchandising spin-offs, generating a craze for all things Davy that eclipses even "Star Wars." Yet, visiting the Alamo, standing where Col. William Barret Travis drew a line in the sand and dared those who would stand with him to cross over, it's hard not to be moved by the bravery of men who chose to stay and fight knowing they would be slaughtered.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 1, 1994
The Rolling Stones may gather no moss, but hope to gather some viewers as they appear throughout prime time tonight on Fox, as the network cuts live, between programs and commercials, to present quick glimpses of the Stones performing on opening night of their 1994 world tour. If you'd prefer a full-length concert special to these tiny snippets -- well, you can't always get what you want. And that sentiment goes for the rest of tonight's programming as well.* "The Simpsons" (8-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45)
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 19, 1991
The king of the wild frontier has become master of the discreet chardonnay. The fella who was born on a mountain top in Tennessee is now growing grapes on a hillside in California. And the cry "Remember the Alamo" may now be joined by "Remember the Riesling." Davy Crockett is making wine.Pardon the hyperbole, but those of us who grew up watching television shows of Davy battling Indians and wrestling river pirates and patching up the crack in the Liberty Bell, get all worked up at the notion that Fess Parker, the actor who played Davy in the 1950s television series, is now owner of a California vineyard, Parker Station.
FEATURES
By --Holly Selby | October 31, 1990
Remember the Halloween your daughter wanted to be Madonna and nothing less than bleaching her hair would do? Remember the year you stayed up till midnight gluing feathers on a yellow leotard so your 4-year-old could be Big Bird?"
FEATURES
August 16, 1999
Remember the Alamo? Many people don't. But Texans do, and they're proud of the story. In Texas, it's a symbol of a fight for independence.The story of the brave men who fought to save the Alamo is a story that you should know, too. The best place to start is right in the center of San Antonio, in the busy town square, where part of the Alamo still stands.When you cross the plaza, the Alamo at first appears smaller than you expect. But our guide, the Alamo's historian, Richard Bruce Winders, had us stop and picture the historic garrison, or fort, as it would have been 163 years ago. The classic shape of what we call the Alamo is the original church.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 3, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas -- From coonskin caps to lunchboxes and cap pistols, Davy Crockett memorabilia has made the Alamo hero and American frontiersman the country's greatest pop culture symbol, right? It is an arguable position, but at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin, a new exhibit could sway the most ardent objector. The exhibit, Sunrise in His Pocket: The Life, Legend and Legacy of Davy Crockett, opened this weekend and will run through Aug. 18. It is a collection of bona fide Crockett artifacts, including a flintlock rifle and pages of personal letters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen R. Proctor and By Stephen R. Proctor,Sun Staff | January 14, 2001
"A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory," by Randy Roberts and James N. Olson. The Free Press. 352 pages. $26. No event in U.S. history has been more mythologized than the battle of the Alamo. Disney's Davy Crockett trilogy was, after all, the granddaddy of movies with merchandising spin-offs, generating a craze for all things Davy that eclipses even "Star Wars." Yet, visiting the Alamo, standing where Col. William Barret Travis drew a line in the sand and dared those who would stand with him to cross over, it's hard not to be moved by the bravery of men who chose to stay and fight knowing they would be slaughtered.
FEATURES
August 16, 1999
Remember the Alamo? Many people don't. But Texans do, and they're proud of the story. In Texas, it's a symbol of a fight for independence.The story of the brave men who fought to save the Alamo is a story that you should know, too. The best place to start is right in the center of San Antonio, in the busy town square, where part of the Alamo still stands.When you cross the plaza, the Alamo at first appears smaller than you expect. But our guide, the Alamo's historian, Richard Bruce Winders, had us stop and picture the historic garrison, or fort, as it would have been 163 years ago. The classic shape of what we call the Alamo is the original church.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 1, 1994
The Rolling Stones may gather no moss, but hope to gather some viewers as they appear throughout prime time tonight on Fox, as the network cuts live, between programs and commercials, to present quick glimpses of the Stones performing on opening night of their 1994 world tour. If you'd prefer a full-length concert special to these tiny snippets -- well, you can't always get what you want. And that sentiment goes for the rest of tonight's programming as well.* "The Simpsons" (8-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 25, 1992
"Mr. Saturday Night" is a postcard from the bitter kingdom of Almost. Perhaps you know this zone; perhaps you even live there: it's peopled by writers who almost wrote best sellers and vice presidents who almost became presidents and reporters who almost became columnists and comics who almost became stars.So it happened to Buddy Young Jr., who had a taste of the what it felt like back in the '50s. He was as big as Berle, as Dean and Jerry. You know Buddy. He's old show biz, a pro, one of those masters of exquisite timing, honed by working a thousand nights of bad rooms down through the years.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 19, 1991
The king of the wild frontier has become master of the discreet chardonnay. The fella who was born on a mountain top in Tennessee is now growing grapes on a hillside in California. And the cry "Remember the Alamo" may now be joined by "Remember the Riesling." Davy Crockett is making wine.Pardon the hyperbole, but those of us who grew up watching television shows of Davy battling Indians and wrestling river pirates and patching up the crack in the Liberty Bell, get all worked up at the notion that Fess Parker, the actor who played Davy in the 1950s television series, is now owner of a California vineyard, Parker Station.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 25, 1992
"Mr. Saturday Night" is a postcard from the bitter kingdom of Almost. Perhaps you know this zone; perhaps you even live there: it's peopled by writers who almost wrote best sellers and vice presidents who almost became presidents and reporters who almost became columnists and comics who almost became stars.So it happened to Buddy Young Jr., who had a taste of the what it felt like back in the '50s. He was as big as Berle, as Dean and Jerry. You know Buddy. He's old show biz, a pro, one of those masters of exquisite timing, honed by working a thousand nights of bad rooms down through the years.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | May 3, 1991
MOVERS AND SHAKERS: Finally, there's some real action for the homeless. At a Center Club breakfast this week, Lou Grasmick, Baltimore's fund-raising rainmaker, unveiled plans to raise at least $250,000 for Maryland's homeless.He rounded up many of the state's movers and shakers, who have agreed to sell $10 raffle tickets for the "House with a Heart" between now and the drawing Oct. 26. The winner will move into a $200,000 Ryland home located in the Seven Oaks Development in Anne Arundel County.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | May 3, 1991
MOVERS AND SHAKERS: Finally, there's some real action for the homeless. At a Center Club breakfast this week, Lou Grasmick, Baltimore's fund-raising rainmaker, unveiled plans to raise at least $250,000 for Maryland's homeless.He rounded up many of the state's movers and shakers, who have agreed to sell $10 raffle tickets for the "House with a Heart" between now and the drawing Oct. 26. The winner will move into a $200,000 Ryland home located in the Seven Oaks Development in Anne Arundel County.
FEATURES
By --Holly Selby | October 31, 1990
Remember the Halloween your daughter wanted to be Madonna and nothing less than bleaching her hair would do? Remember the year you stayed up till midnight gluing feathers on a yellow leotard so your 4-year-old could be Big Bird?"
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