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NEWS
May 18, 2005
On May 14, 2005, BURNELL, beloved father of three sons; Stephen L., Burnell and Andrew Jones; four daughters, Paula Floyd, Burnadette House, Jennifer and Davida Jones; one brother, James H. Burrell; five sisters, Catherine and Shirley Burrell, Lillian Washington, Penesola Garrett and Betty Ann Permix. Friends may call at the Wylie Funeral Home, P.A., 638 N. Gilmor Street, on Wednesday, 5 to 8 P.M. Family will receive friends on Thursday, 10:30 A.M. Funeral 11:00 A.M. at Unity United Methodist Church, 1433 Edmondson Avenue.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 18, 2005
On May 14, 2005, BURNELL, beloved father of three sons; Stephen L., Burnell and Andrew Jones; four daughters, Paula Floyd, Burnadette House, Jennifer and Davida Jones; one brother, James H. Burrell; five sisters, Catherine and Shirley Burrell, Lillian Washington, Penesola Garrett and Betty Ann Permix. Friends may call at the Wylie Funeral Home, P.A., 638 N. Gilmor Street, on Wednesday, 5 to 8 P.M. Family will receive friends on Thursday, 10:30 A.M. Funeral 11:00 A.M. at Unity United Methodist Church, 1433 Edmondson Avenue.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Steven Oken and his mother talk on the phone nearly every day, and she visits him every week. But in 17 years of conversations about such varied topics as local sports teams and world events, there's a topic that Davida Oken says she hasn't ever broached: the crimes that put her son on death row. "Why bring it up?" she asks. "I have never asked him for details, for an explanation. What good would it do?" Steven Oken, the son of a pharmacist, was 25 years old and married in November 1987 when he raped and killed three women.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Steven Oken and his mother talk on the phone nearly every day, and she visits him every week. But in 17 years of conversations about such varied topics as local sports teams and world events, there's a topic that Davida Oken says she hasn't ever broached: the crimes that put her son on death row. "Why bring it up?" she asks. "I have never asked him for details, for an explanation. What good would it do?" Steven Oken, the son of a pharmacist, was 25 years old and married in November 1987 when he raped and killed three women.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | January 21, 1991
A Baltimore County Circuit Court hearing on whether convicted murderer Steven H. Oken is sane and criminally responsible for his actions was postponed until tomorrow.The second stage of the murder trial, which had been scheduled to begin today, was postponed by Judge James Smith at the request of defense attorney Benjamin Lipsitz, who said he needed time to prepare for the insanity defense.Beginning tomorrow, Lipsitz is planning to call several psychiatrists and other witnesses to try to prove that Oken, 29, formerly of White Marsh, was insane at the time of the Nov. 2, 1987, slaying of Dawn Marie Garvin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2003
Rare is the person who would wish to leave this life without a trace. Most of us will not merit the attention of future biographers or have our names engraved on something other than a tombstone. Still, we at least expect a fond place in the remembrances of those we leave behind. Who knows whether Tyrone Douglas Lewis harbored such cares. Certainly, by the time the end arrived in his 48th year, he had come perilously close to an earthly departure that would be barely noticed and wholly unmourned.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2004
It was a speech like no other that Rabbi Rex Perlmeter had given -- delivered inside a Baptist church and pressing the argument that the death penalty is "killing the soul of this country." When he finished his talk last week at Mount Hope Baptist Church in Northwest Baltimore, the rabbi walked over to the parents of Steven Oken -- a death-row inmate who could be executed as early as next week -- and wrapped his arms around them. Then Perlmeter, senior rabbi of the 1,500-family Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, kissed Davida Oken and whispered in her ear, asking her forgiveness for ignoring her pleas for help on behalf of her son years ago. "It meant a lot to me," she says.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2003
With slightly more than a month before convicted murderer Steven H. Oken is scheduled to die, opponents of the death penalty rushed from one lawmaker's door to another last night to build support in Annapolis for an extension of the moratorium on executions. Among those lobbying was Madison Hobley, a 16-year death row inmate from Illinois who was pardoned last month after it was found that he was tortured by police into a confession for a crime he did not commit. "The governor had the courage to pardon me on actual innocence," said Hobley, 42, who was convicted of a 1987 arson in which his wife and child died.
TRAVEL
October 22, 2000
A turn for the better A MEMORABLE PLACE By Davida Gypsy Breier When my best friend and I traveled to the United Kingdom last January, we had no set itinerary -- just a car, a map, a little money and 12 days. We started out in London, went south to Brighton, east to Dover, and on the sixth day found ourselves driving north through the legendary moors. As we left breathtaking North York Moors National Park, we were faced with turning left and heading inland or turning right and driving toward the coast.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | March 5, 1993
Radio can help span cultural differences, suggests a new project launched by the Baltimore-based documentary program "Soundprint."Broadcasters from five English-speaking nations -- the United States, Britain, Ireland, Australia and Canada -- met in Washington recently to lay the groundwork for "Crossing Boundaries," a series of documentaries scheduled to air in each country beginning this fall.Each participant will produce three programs, according to Moira Rankin, executive producer of "Soundprint," which recently affiliated with National Public Radio.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2004
It was a speech like no other that Rabbi Rex Perlmeter had given -- delivered inside a Baptist church and pressing the argument that the death penalty is "killing the soul of this country." When he finished his talk last week at Mount Hope Baptist Church in Northwest Baltimore, the rabbi walked over to the parents of Steven Oken -- a death-row inmate who could be executed as early as next week -- and wrapped his arms around them. Then Perlmeter, senior rabbi of the 1,500-family Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, kissed Davida Oken and whispered in her ear, asking her forgiveness for ignoring her pleas for help on behalf of her son years ago. "It meant a lot to me," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2003
Rare is the person who would wish to leave this life without a trace. Most of us will not merit the attention of future biographers or have our names engraved on something other than a tombstone. Still, we at least expect a fond place in the remembrances of those we leave behind. Who knows whether Tyrone Douglas Lewis harbored such cares. Certainly, by the time the end arrived in his 48th year, he had come perilously close to an earthly departure that would be barely noticed and wholly unmourned.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2003
With slightly more than a month before convicted murderer Steven H. Oken is scheduled to die, opponents of the death penalty rushed from one lawmaker's door to another last night to build support in Annapolis for an extension of the moratorium on executions. Among those lobbying was Madison Hobley, a 16-year death row inmate from Illinois who was pardoned last month after it was found that he was tortured by police into a confession for a crime he did not commit. "The governor had the courage to pardon me on actual innocence," said Hobley, 42, who was convicted of a 1987 arson in which his wife and child died.
TRAVEL
October 22, 2000
A turn for the better A MEMORABLE PLACE By Davida Gypsy Breier When my best friend and I traveled to the United Kingdom last January, we had no set itinerary -- just a car, a map, a little money and 12 days. We started out in London, went south to Brighton, east to Dover, and on the sixth day found ourselves driving north through the legendary moors. As we left breathtaking North York Moors National Park, we were faced with turning left and heading inland or turning right and driving toward the coast.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | December 8, 1993
In Wednesday's Today section article about a Russian-language radio program, the International Food Market Inc. at 6970 Reisterstown Road was incorrectly identified as being located in Reisterstown.The Sun regrets the error.On a waterlogged Sunday morning, Anna Toporovsky and Albert Plaks urgently debate in Russian some last-minute script changes. Pavel Tuvelman, a soft-spoken man in a flannel shirt and jeans, sorts tapes labeled in Cyrillic, while the preceding program, featuring a preacher praising the Lord in English, winds to an end.It's 10 minutes until air time for "Zvezda Davida (Star of David)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | March 5, 1993
Radio can help span cultural differences, suggests a new project launched by the Baltimore-based documentary program "Soundprint."Broadcasters from five English-speaking nations -- the United States, Britain, Ireland, Australia and Canada -- met in Washington recently to lay the groundwork for "Crossing Boundaries," a series of documentaries scheduled to air in each country beginning this fall.Each participant will produce three programs, according to Moira Rankin, executive producer of "Soundprint," which recently affiliated with National Public Radio.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | December 8, 1993
In Wednesday's Today section article about a Russian-language radio program, the International Food Market Inc. at 6970 Reisterstown Road was incorrectly identified as being located in Reisterstown.The Sun regrets the error.On a waterlogged Sunday morning, Anna Toporovsky and Albert Plaks urgently debate in Russian some last-minute script changes. Pavel Tuvelman, a soft-spoken man in a flannel shirt and jeans, sorts tapes labeled in Cyrillic, while the preceding program, featuring a preacher praising the Lord in English, winds to an end.It's 10 minutes until air time for "Zvezda Davida (Star of David)
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | January 21, 1991
A Baltimore County Circuit Court hearing on whether convicted murderer Steven H. Oken is sane and criminally responsible for his actions was postponed until tomorrow.The second stage of the murder trial, which had been scheduled to begin today, was postponed by Judge James Smith at the request of defense attorney Benjamin Lipsitz, who said he needed time to prepare for the insanity defense.Beginning tomorrow, Lipsitz is planning to call several psychiatrists and other witnesses to try to prove that Oken, 29, formerly of White Marsh, was insane at the time of the Nov. 2, 1987, slaying of Dawn Marie Garvin.
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