Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDavid Zinman
IN THE NEWS

David Zinman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 11, 2007
Tonight, maestro David Zinman will be conducting a performance of Madame Butterfly at the Aspen Music Festival in Colorado, where he spends his summers teaching and leading musical ensembles. The man who led the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is now 71, and he is as busy as ever. His bags are always packed and ready to go. In his 13 years with the BSO, he became known for championing American music, much of it commissioned by the Baltimore ensemble. Though he says he spends 30 to 40 days a year at his home in Cape May, N.J., he also lives four months in Zurich, Switzerland, where he leads the Tonhalle Orchestra and is recording a complete series of the Gustav Mahler symphonies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
I kind of grew up with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra," says Yo-Yo Ma, the exceedingly gifted and adventurous cellist who will be the featured artist in the BSO's season-launching gala Saturday. "So I'm very excited about doing the opening concert." Ma, chatting by phone from his summer home in the Berkshires, recalls first performing with the orchestra in its pre-Meyerhoff Symphony Hall days at the Lyric Opera House with then-music director Sergiu Comissiona. "He was an incredibly kind man, very paternal to me," the cellist says.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1995
David Zinman stepped onto the podium last Tuesday, gave a brisk good morning to the musicians, and with two strokes began his 10th year as musical director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.Newly bearded and just back from an eight-month sabbatical, he looked tan and fit, but the conductor and his players seemed edgy. The gathering was their first regular season rehearsal together since December -- and musicians and maestro knew their beautiful music could abruptly fall silent.Tonight, the BSO celebrates Mr. Zinman's anniversary as musical director with a fund-raising gala and concert.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 11, 2007
Tonight, maestro David Zinman will be conducting a performance of Madame Butterfly at the Aspen Music Festival in Colorado, where he spends his summers teaching and leading musical ensembles. The man who led the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is now 71, and he is as busy as ever. His bags are always packed and ready to go. In his 13 years with the BSO, he became known for championing American music, much of it commissioned by the Baltimore ensemble. Though he says he spends 30 to 40 days a year at his home in Cape May, N.J., he also lives four months in Zurich, Switzerland, where he leads the Tonhalle Orchestra and is recording a complete series of the Gustav Mahler symphonies.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | February 15, 1991
Tomorrow's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Casual Concert -- which includes a specially scripted skit about composer -- is being recorded as a pilot for a possible new nationally broadcast radio series of BSO concerts.Producer Judith Schonbach said yesterday the pilot is being made as part of a new program by American Public Radio designed to "present classical music in fresh new ways."A writer for "Garrison Keillor's American Radio Company," and its earlier incarnation, "Prairie Home Companion," wrote the skit, which stars BSO music director David Zinman.
NEWS
June 14, 1998
NOW THAT he has conducted his last concert as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Baltimore can take stock of David Zinman's contribution to this region's cultural life. It has been enormous.Mr. Zinman was an institution builder. He made the musical ensemble better and more versatile. He took an orchestra that some admirers said could not survive the loss of his predecessor, Sergiu Comissiona, and made it thrive.He took the orchestra to recording prominence with Grammy-winning performances.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 7, 1998
An article in yesterday's Arts & Society section gave an incorrect year for David Zinman's return to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra after a musicians strike. The conductor returned to the podium in 1989.The Sun regrets the errors.One of David Zinman's greatest moments with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will take place this week, when he leads the last program of his 13-year-tenure as the symphony's music director.My prediction has nothing to do with chutzpah, arrogance or insanity. It's just that I know David Zinman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By STEPHEN WIGLER and STEPHEN WIGLER,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 27, 1999
A new three-CD set of live recordings issued by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, "The Zinman Legacy," has allowed me to return to the scene of the crime: performances of Mozart, Brahms, Prokofiev, Tchaikovsky and Mahler that I reviewed. I can thus not only re-review some of David Zinman's performances, but also some of mine.First, however, I want to question the use of the words "The Zinman Legacy" for this release. If we talk about the Zinman legacy, we must talk about his celebrated role as an advocate for new American music.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 10, 1996
In Tuesday's articles about the resignation of Baltimore Symphony Orchestra conductor David Zinman, two photo captions contained incorrect information. In one, Harvey M. Meyerhoff was misidentified; in the other, the caption should have referred to Zinman's return from a sabbatical in September 1995.The Sun regrets the errors.In the aftermath of David Zinman's resignation yesterday as music director of the Baltimore Symphony, there are two ways to think about the future of the orchestra.Optimists will point out how attractive an ensemble he will leave behind in June 1998.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 1, 1997
Yakov Kreizberg is nonplused when he's asked how he likes the idea of being music director of an American orchestra."But I already have two posts," says Kreizberg, 37, the principal conductor of the Bournemouth Symphony in Great Britain and the Generalmusikdirector of the Komische Oper Berlin."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Mary Carole McCauley and Tim Smith and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2005
The last time the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was in the market for a new music director, almost 10 years ago, a search committee representing management, musicians and board members soon had a clear favorite to succeed David Zinman - Yuri Temirkanov. The symphony president and board chairman pursued him doggedly, almost around the globe, until he finally agreed to sign a contract. But the whole process was done internally and quietly, as is most orchestral business. Since September, when Temirkanov announced that he would step down at the end of the 2005-2006 season, the BSO has been searching again.
NEWS
October 3, 2001
We need new music to help us face fears, keep our spirits alive The defensive responses to David Zinman's resignation as music director emeritus of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra (BSO) by Tim Smith ("Departure won't hurt BSO image," Sept. 18) and the editorial "Symphony for troubled times" (Sept. 20) are understandable, especially given the musical gifts of Yuri Temirkanov. However, the gift Mr. Zinman has given us in this decision is to bring up an issue important to the vibrancy of our culture.
NEWS
September 25, 2001
Baltimore's symphony promises to thrive under new maestro Tim Smith is absolutely correct in his synopsis of David Zinman's resignation as music director emeritus of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra (BSO) ("Zinman leaving BSO post," Sept. 17). And he placed that announcement in the proper perspective of the past week's tragedies. Mr. Smith's timing is 100 percent on; Mr. Zinman's is 100 percent off. The BSO has never sounded as good as it does under the musical direction of Maestro Yuri Temirkanov.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 18, 2001
In light of last week, many things seem less important now. That's how I view the extraordinary news that David Zinman has decided to relinquish his title of music director emeritus of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, voicing displeasure with the priorities of his successor on the podium, Yuri Temirkanov. Understandably, folks at the BSO don't want to talk much about this strange development. It struck without apparent warning and without much sense. But, in the grand scheme of things, Zinman's action is not really so damaging to the orchestra.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | September 22, 2000
I CONSIDERED Big Little Joey Peske to be a gift from God. It seemed like he fell from the sky one autumn night in 1989 -- a comic comet who, for the next several years, made me and countless other Baltimoreans laugh. This was back when I moonlighted as host of a weeknight talk show on WBAL Radio. The first time Peske called the show and we spoke on the air, he played me like a cheap ukulele. "Danny," he said, in a voice that crossed Tom Waits with George Burns, "you made a big mistake on the answer to tonight's Baltimore trivia quiz."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to the Sun | April 9, 2000
If you want to get a rise out of Gustav Meier, the courtly 70-year-old maestro who teaches the art of conducting at Baltimore's Peabody Institute of Music, ask him if he agrees that great conductors are born, not made. "That's absolutely not true," the Swiss-born Meier says with a shake of his head that led with the chin. "There were many students I may have had some doubts about, but they are doing extremely well. With hard work, they have made themselves into talented conductors." It would be folly to argue the point, for talented young conductors are Gustav Meier's stock-in-trade.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 9, 2000
Almost a year has passed since David Zinman, the former music director of the Baltimore Symphony, last conducted the orchestra. Tonight, he returns in a program that includes the Elgar violin concerto performed with soloist Pinchas Zukerman, the Sibelius Symphony No. 6 and John Harbison's "Music for 18 Winds." It may seem like something of a homecoming, but as Zinman points out, homecomings are a little different when you don't visit much. "It's like visiting your family," he says, sitting backstage after a rehearsal at the Meyerhoff.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 14, 1997
A trio of new recordings by David Zinman showcases the music director of the Baltimore Symphony and the Zurich Tonhalle Orchestra in the roles in which he shines most brightly: as a champion of 20th-century music (an all-Leonard Bernstein disc with the BSO on the London label); as a sensitive collaborator in concertos (the Gershwin and Ravel G major concertos with pianist Helene Grimaud and the BSO on Erato); and as a stimulating interpreter of Beethoven (in performances of Symphonies Nos. 5 and 6 with the Zurich orchestra on Arte Nova Classics, a new super-budget label distributed by BMG Classics)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 9, 2000
Almost a year has passed since David Zinman, the former music director of the Baltimore Symphony, last conducted the orchestra. Tonight, he returns in a program that includes the Elgar violin concerto performed with soloist Pinchas Zukerman, the Sibelius Symphony No. 6 and John Harbison's "Music for 18 Winds." It may seem like something of a homecoming, but as Zinman points out, homecomings are a little different when you don't visit much. "It's like visiting your family," he says, sitting backstage after a rehearsal at the Meyerhoff.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2000
The name is Yuri Temirkanov. Tem-ir-KOHN-off. For the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, that name resonates with the excitement and high hopes of a new musical era -- one that starts Thursday when the 61-year-old conductor steps onto the podium and leads the orchestra in concert for the first time as its artistic director. Temirkanov, the 11th person to fill the position in the orchestra's 83-year history, begins his tenure with the BSO looking to him to improve it artistically and to enhance its reputation in the United States and abroad.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.