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David Trimble

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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 16, 1996
LONDON -- David Trimble doesn't own a bowler hat.For a Protestant politician in Northern Ireland, this omission is a big deal. The bowler hat is a badge of Protestant identity, part of the uniform that Orangemen wear as they march through streets, celebrating victories in long-ago battles that shaped the landscape. Celebrating their Britishness."People keep telling me to get a hat," he says with a laugh. "But I won't."Mr. Trimble, leader of the Ulster Unionists, the most powerful Protestant political party in Northern Ireland, is an independent spirit.
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NEWS
November 1, 2001
Ignoring the abuses N. Ireland's Catholics continue to confront The Sun's observations on the Irish Republican Army's disposal of arms were troubling ("Disarming Irish politics," editorial, Oct. 25). For almost three years, the Ulster Taliban of Ian Paisley and David Trimble have done everything in their power to wreck the Belfast Agreement and restore direct rule from London. The "brinkmanship" The Sun applauds was their last irresponsible act. The arms were disposed of because the IRA garrison is being dismantled, not because of any buffoonery by Mr. Trimble.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 1998
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- New alliances emerged yesterday in the aftermath of the Northern Ireland Assembly election, with the British province's largest Catholic and Protestant parties turning away from old divisions to unite in support of the fragile peace process.The vote produced a clear endorsement of the new assembly, the centerpiece of the peace settlement reached April 10. But it also laid bare a strong challenge from within the Protestant movement to one of its key players, David Trimble, head of the Ulster Unionist Party and presumed leader of the new body.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 9, 2001
LONDON -- With its troubled past, complex issues and combative leaders, Northern Ireland often leaves outsiders perplexed. The British province once again faces a turning point as its leaders try to forestall the collapse of a local government and end a stalemate over disarming paramilitary forces, reforming the local police, and scaling back Britain's military presence. Part of the United Kingdom, Northern Ireland's six counties share a 303-mile border with the southern Irish republic.
NEWS
September 29, 1997
GREAT HOPES attend the negotiations at Stormont, near Belfast, that aim to bring accommodation to the Protestant and Catholic communities in Northern Ireland, to Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic, and to that republic and Britain. A business committee gets down to setting an agenda -- in itself, substance -- today.Two developments, following the second IRA ceasefire, permit optimism. One is that John Hume, leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party (SDLP), biggest vote-winner among the Catholic minority in the province, is not running for president of the Irish Republic, for which he is eligible.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 27, 1999
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- In 1996, the year after he became leader of the Ulster Unionists, a defiant David Trimble stood before the party faithful and said: "Compromise between nationalism and unionism is not possible. And even if it were, it is not desirable."Last week, a decidedly different David Trimble acknowledged that the nationalists' goal of unifying the two Irelands is legitimate if sought through peaceful means, and he spoke in conciliatory language unprecedented for a unionist leader.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 1998
LONDON -- The leaders of Northern Ireland's main Roman Catholic and Protestant political parties, John Hume and David Trimble, won the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize yesterday for their efforts to end 30 years of sectarian violence in the British-ruled province.In honoring a peacemaker from each community, the Norwegian Nobel Committee clearly intended to bolster this year's Good Friday peace agreement against its ardent opponents and doubters.Hume, 61, the Catholic leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party, has been at the forefront of Northern Ireland politics since the 1960s human rights movement.
NEWS
April 12, 1998
THE AGREEMENT to re-establish an assembly of Northern Ireland, to cooperate across the border and to bring Ireland and Britain closer offers people stuck in historic quarrels a chance to go forward. It is not a united but an agreed Ireland.The success of negotiations, after a quarter century of failed initiatives, reflects credit on many participants. Foremost is John Hume, the political leader of the nationalist minority of Northern Ireland for a generation, whose ideas planted with others charted all progress made since the 1980s.
NEWS
October 19, 1998
JOHN HUME and David Trimble have given every indication of despising each other. This has not prevented their great cooperation in bringing the Northern Ireland Assembly and executive government to the brink of reality. Reason enough for their joint Nobel Peace Prize.Mr. Hume, 61, crusaded first for civil rights for Catholics in British Northern Ireland, then for Irish unification by political means, and ultimately for peace and self-government, embracing the legitimacy of both nationalist traditions.
NEWS
November 1, 2001
Ignoring the abuses N. Ireland's Catholics continue to confront The Sun's observations on the Irish Republican Army's disposal of arms were troubling ("Disarming Irish politics," editorial, Oct. 25). For almost three years, the Ulster Taliban of Ian Paisley and David Trimble have done everything in their power to wreck the Belfast Agreement and restore direct rule from London. The "brinkmanship" The Sun applauds was their last irresponsible act. The arms were disposed of because the IRA garrison is being dismantled, not because of any buffoonery by Mr. Trimble.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 7, 2001
LONDON - Moving closer to taking weapons out of Northern Ireland's politics, the Irish Republican Army proposed a method to get rid of its arms, an international panel announced yesterday as the British province's 3-year-old peace deal hung in the balance. British Prime Minister Tony Blair described the initiative as "an important step forward," and Irish premier Bertie Ahern called it "historic." But the IRA's critics, who have long demanded that the outlawed Catholic paramilitary group disarm, noted no details were provided about how, when or where it would dispose of its weapons.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 27, 1999
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- In 1996, the year after he became leader of the Ulster Unionists, a defiant David Trimble stood before the party faithful and said: "Compromise between nationalism and unionism is not possible. And even if it were, it is not desirable."Last week, a decidedly different David Trimble acknowledged that the nationalists' goal of unifying the two Irelands is legitimate if sought through peaceful means, and he spoke in conciliatory language unprecedented for a unionist leader.
NEWS
October 19, 1998
JOHN HUME and David Trimble have given every indication of despising each other. This has not prevented their great cooperation in bringing the Northern Ireland Assembly and executive government to the brink of reality. Reason enough for their joint Nobel Peace Prize.Mr. Hume, 61, crusaded first for civil rights for Catholics in British Northern Ireland, then for Irish unification by political means, and ultimately for peace and self-government, embracing the legitimacy of both nationalist traditions.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 1998
LONDON -- The leaders of Northern Ireland's main Roman Catholic and Protestant political parties, John Hume and David Trimble, won the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize yesterday for their efforts to end 30 years of sectarian violence in the British-ruled province.In honoring a peacemaker from each community, the Norwegian Nobel Committee clearly intended to bolster this year's Good Friday peace agreement against its ardent opponents and doubters.Hume, 61, the Catholic leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party, has been at the forefront of Northern Ireland politics since the 1960s human rights movement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 1998
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- New alliances emerged yesterday in the aftermath of the Northern Ireland Assembly election, with the British province's largest Catholic and Protestant parties turning away from old divisions to unite in support of the fragile peace process.The vote produced a clear endorsement of the new assembly, the centerpiece of the peace settlement reached April 10. But it also laid bare a strong challenge from within the Protestant movement to one of its key players, David Trimble, head of the Ulster Unionist Party and presumed leader of the new body.
NEWS
April 12, 1998
THE AGREEMENT to re-establish an assembly of Northern Ireland, to cooperate across the border and to bring Ireland and Britain closer offers people stuck in historic quarrels a chance to go forward. It is not a united but an agreed Ireland.The success of negotiations, after a quarter century of failed initiatives, reflects credit on many participants. Foremost is John Hume, the political leader of the nationalist minority of Northern Ireland for a generation, whose ideas planted with others charted all progress made since the 1980s.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 7, 2001
LONDON - Moving closer to taking weapons out of Northern Ireland's politics, the Irish Republican Army proposed a method to get rid of its arms, an international panel announced yesterday as the British province's 3-year-old peace deal hung in the balance. British Prime Minister Tony Blair described the initiative as "an important step forward," and Irish premier Bertie Ahern called it "historic." But the IRA's critics, who have long demanded that the outlawed Catholic paramilitary group disarm, noted no details were provided about how, when or where it would dispose of its weapons.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 9, 2001
LONDON -- With its troubled past, complex issues and combative leaders, Northern Ireland often leaves outsiders perplexed. The British province once again faces a turning point as its leaders try to forestall the collapse of a local government and end a stalemate over disarming paramilitary forces, reforming the local police, and scaling back Britain's military presence. Part of the United Kingdom, Northern Ireland's six counties share a 303-mile border with the southern Irish republic.
NEWS
September 29, 1997
GREAT HOPES attend the negotiations at Stormont, near Belfast, that aim to bring accommodation to the Protestant and Catholic communities in Northern Ireland, to Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic, and to that republic and Britain. A business committee gets down to setting an agenda -- in itself, substance -- today.Two developments, following the second IRA ceasefire, permit optimism. One is that John Hume, leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party (SDLP), biggest vote-winner among the Catholic minority in the province, is not running for president of the Irish Republic, for which he is eligible.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 16, 1996
LONDON -- David Trimble doesn't own a bowler hat.For a Protestant politician in Northern Ireland, this omission is a big deal. The bowler hat is a badge of Protestant identity, part of the uniform that Orangemen wear as they march through streets, celebrating victories in long-ago battles that shaped the landscape. Celebrating their Britishness."People keep telling me to get a hat," he says with a laugh. "But I won't."Mr. Trimble, leader of the Ulster Unionists, the most powerful Protestant political party in Northern Ireland, is an independent spirit.
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