Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDavid Souter
IN THE NEWS

David Souter

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By David G. Savage and Christi Parsons and David G. Savage and Christi Parsons,Tribune Washington Bureau | May 27, 2009
WASHINGTON - - President Barack Obama decided Tuesday to send to the Supreme Court a veteran federal judge from New York whose humble upbringing and moderate-to-liberal record on the bench is not likely to trigger a "culture wars" battle in the Senate. Judge Sonia Sotomayor, 54, who would be the first Hispanic justice on the high court, has not ruled squarely on controversies such as abortion or gay rights, and legal experts say her narrowly written opinions resemble those of the justice she would replace, David Souter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By David G. Savage and Christi Parsons and David G. Savage and Christi Parsons,Tribune Washington Bureau | May 27, 2009
WASHINGTON - - President Barack Obama decided Tuesday to send to the Supreme Court a veteran federal judge from New York whose humble upbringing and moderate-to-liberal record on the bench is not likely to trigger a "culture wars" battle in the Senate. Judge Sonia Sotomayor, 54, who would be the first Hispanic justice on the high court, has not ruled squarely on controversies such as abortion or gay rights, and legal experts say her narrowly written opinions resemble those of the justice she would replace, David Souter.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Barbara Mallonee | September 22, 1990
Weare, New Hampshire. CONCORD SITS on the west bank of the Merrimack. From the river's shore, one can see the dome of the state capitol, blue sky beyond each open arch. The drive up to Concord from the Connecticut River valley winds among innumerable lakes, deep pine forests and rustling woods at their edges giving way to golden fields and green orchards. Tucked into the countryside are small New England towns, each with its church spire, its monument to the Civil War dead, Main Street, a shady cemetery, gardens bright with petunias and American flags.
FEATURES
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 14, 1995
San Jose, Calif. -- When have you seen phrases like these in the personals ads?"Non-dogmatically spiritual . . .""A clone of Dick Cavett and David Souter . . .""Brilliant bohemian WASP beauty w/house, cat, garden & silver service for 12 seeks soul mate for marriage & child."They aren't your typical singles ads, but then these aren't your typical singles. They're graduates and faculty of the country's top universities -- the Ivies, Stanford and Berkeley to name a few -- and the ads come from the Northern California offerings of a nationwide dating service just for them.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | September 15, 1990
SENATOR GORDON Humphrey told the Senate Judiciary Committeethat he was sick and tired of hearing people say David Souter would be the first Supreme Court justice from New Hampshire in 117 years. There was a New Hampshireman on the court as recently as 44 years ago, he said.Chief Justice Harlan Fiske Stone was born in Chesterfield, N.H., in 1872, all right, but, unlike David Souter, he left the state to make a name for himself. He practiced law for the celebrated New York Wall Street law firm of Sullivan & Cromwell.
NEWS
July 7, 1992
The Supreme Court that just ended its term delivered a number of important decisions -- forbidding prayer in school, upholding free speech even of the noxious kind, saying police may not pressure citizens to break a law in order to prosecute them, requiring states to take affirmative steps to end college level racial segregation, vetoing racist jury selection by defense lawyers, allowing states to forbid write-in votes and suggesting governments may have...
FEATURES
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 14, 1995
San Jose, Calif. -- When have you seen phrases like these in the personals ads?"Non-dogmatically spiritual . . .""A clone of Dick Cavett and David Souter . . .""Brilliant bohemian WASP beauty w/house, cat, garden & silver service for 12 seeks soul mate for marriage & child."They aren't your typical singles ads, but then these aren't your typical singles. They're graduates and faculty of the country's top universities -- the Ivies, Stanford and Berkeley to name a few -- and the ads come from the Northern California offerings of a nationwide dating service just for them.
NEWS
January 24, 1991
Only four times in the past four terms of the Supreme Court did Justices Sandra O'Connor, William Brennan, Thurgood Marshall, Harry Blackmun and John Paul Stevens join to win a 5-4 decision. Many court observers believed that when Justice David Souter, widely advertised as a conservative, replaced Mr. Brennan, the court's leading liberal, that was the end of that.This week, in the first 5-4 decision of his tenure on the Supreme Court, Justice Souter voted as Justice Brennan would have, joining Justices O'Connor, Marshall, Blackmun and Stevens in overturning a Florida court on a state criminal case.
NEWS
By Paul Greenberg | September 13, 1990
THE GRAND inquisition is about to begin in the Senate of the United States, and some folks want to know how David Souter, nominee for the Supreme Court and fair game, will decide the cases to come before him. It's little enough to ask. They might even settle for knowing how he'll go just on abortion. These folks aren't about to buy a justice in a poke. You wouldn't buy a car without a test drive, would you? These careful consumers want an answer up front: Is he for or against Roe vs. Wade?
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | August 5, 1994
Washington. -- When the late Justice Thurgood Marshall filed a dissenting opinion, he dissented passionately. Justice David Souter today dissents learnedly. Justice John Paul Stevens sometimes dissents petulantly. Justice Harry Blackmun tended to dissent windily.2 James J. Kilpatrick is a syndicated columnist.
NEWS
July 7, 1992
The Supreme Court that just ended its term delivered a number of important decisions -- forbidding prayer in school, upholding free speech even of the noxious kind, saying police may not pressure citizens to break a law in order to prosecute them, requiring states to take affirmative steps to end college level racial segregation, vetoing racist jury selection by defense lawyers, allowing states to forbid write-in votes and suggesting governments may have...
NEWS
January 24, 1991
Only four times in the past four terms of the Supreme Court did Justices Sandra O'Connor, William Brennan, Thurgood Marshall, Harry Blackmun and John Paul Stevens join to win a 5-4 decision. Many court observers believed that when Justice David Souter, widely advertised as a conservative, replaced Mr. Brennan, the court's leading liberal, that was the end of that.This week, in the first 5-4 decision of his tenure on the Supreme Court, Justice Souter voted as Justice Brennan would have, joining Justices O'Connor, Marshall, Blackmun and Stevens in overturning a Florida court on a state criminal case.
NEWS
By Barbara Mallonee | September 22, 1990
Weare, New Hampshire. CONCORD SITS on the west bank of the Merrimack. From the river's shore, one can see the dome of the state capitol, blue sky beyond each open arch. The drive up to Concord from the Connecticut River valley winds among innumerable lakes, deep pine forests and rustling woods at their edges giving way to golden fields and green orchards. Tucked into the countryside are small New England towns, each with its church spire, its monument to the Civil War dead, Main Street, a shady cemetery, gardens bright with petunias and American flags.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | September 15, 1990
SENATOR GORDON Humphrey told the Senate Judiciary Committeethat he was sick and tired of hearing people say David Souter would be the first Supreme Court justice from New Hampshire in 117 years. There was a New Hampshireman on the court as recently as 44 years ago, he said.Chief Justice Harlan Fiske Stone was born in Chesterfield, N.H., in 1872, all right, but, unlike David Souter, he left the state to make a name for himself. He practiced law for the celebrated New York Wall Street law firm of Sullivan & Cromwell.
NEWS
By Paul Greenberg | September 13, 1990
THE GRAND inquisition is about to begin in the Senate of the United States, and some folks want to know how David Souter, nominee for the Supreme Court and fair game, will decide the cases to come before him. It's little enough to ask. They might even settle for knowing how he'll go just on abortion. These folks aren't about to buy a justice in a poke. You wouldn't buy a car without a test drive, would you? These careful consumers want an answer up front: Is he for or against Roe vs. Wade?
NEWS
By The New York Times | September 11, 1990
SIX WEEKS after President Bush introduced David Souter as his nominee for the Supreme Court, most Americans haven't a clue about his fitness for the highest bench.Legal scholars of varied philosophy have been poring over some 200 opinions Souter wrote for New Hampshire's Supreme Court and other documents for signs of his political leanings, hints of ideology and evidence of judicial temperament.The verdict is not in, nor can it be until after Souter testifies this week before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.