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David Simon

ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2011
What follows is a personal statement from David Simon, Creator and Executive Producer of "The Wire" (and currently in production on "Treme"). First of all, Felicia's entitled to the presumption of innocence. And I would note that a previous, but recent drug arrest that targeted her was later found to be unwarranted and the charges were dropped. Nonetheless, I'm certainly sad at the news today. This young lady has, from her earliest moments, had one of the hardest lives imaginable.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
In just two weeks, MTV's teens series "Skins" has become one of TV's most compelling dramas. Unfortunately for the producers and MTV executives, that's only the case off-screen, where "Skins" is playing like a car wreck impossible to look away from. Fearful of being connected to something that might wind up being judged "child porn" under various statutes, advertisers are bailing on the Brit-spinoff series, to the point where analysts say MTV could lose $2 million per episode if it decides to stick with the show.
NEWS
By David Simon | January 24, 2011
("The Wire" creator David Simon was invited by The Sun to respond to comments made recently by Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III that the HBO show was a "smear that will take decades to overcome," reviving a debate that took place throughout the show's run.) It is my understanding that Commissioner Bealefeld — by finally choosing to emphasize the quality rather than the quantity of arrests — has been able to reduce the homicide rate somewhat in our city.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2010
David Simon rolled up his sleeves as he prepared to hit the hall full of Johns Hopkins students with his sermon of disillusionment. "There is nothing that makes me optimistic about the future of the country," he said, responding to one student's question about hopeful signs for her generation. Simon's Baltimore-based crime drama, "The Wire," is now part of the curriculum at Hopkins. Students had spent three months admiring the show's painful candor as it tackled the issues facing their newly adopted city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2010
Television writer David Simon might have just picked up a MacArthur Award, commonly called a "genius grant. " School principal and super mom Debbie Phelps might excel at educating others. And Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake might have the intellectual firepower to run an entire city. But that doesn't mean they're up to the challenge of repeating the sixth grade. Indeed, Simon had to rely on two petite powerhouses — middle school students Tyteyona Berry and Rickelle Carter — to defeat five other teams Saturday night in the "Are You Smarter Than a Sixth-Grader" fundraising competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2010
Television writer/producer David Simon might have just picked up a MacArthur Award, commonly called a "genius grant. " School principal and supermom Debbie Phelps might excel in educating others. And Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake might have the intellectual firepower to run an entire city. But that doesn't mean they're up to the challenge of repeating the sixth grade. Indeed, Simon had to rely on two petite powerhouses — middle-school students Tyteyona Berry and Rickelle Carter — to defeat five other teams Saturday night in an "Are You Smarter Than a Sixth-Grader" fundraising competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Baltimorean David Simon, whose groundbreaking television series "The Wire" examined the institutions of his hometown with a passionate and unsparing eye, today won a 2010 MacArthur "genius" award. The 50-year-old Simon is one of only a few people ever to receive one of the prestigious fellowships for work in television. The MacArthur carries a $500,000, no-strings-attached grant parceled out over five years. "The great value of this award is that it will make it easier for all of us to argue for stories that might not otherwise be perceived as popular television," Simon said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
At 7 p.m. Saturday in MICA's Brown Center, David Simon, the creator of "The Wire," will host Stanley Kubrick's "Paths of Glory" and explain why it's just as pertinent and powerful today as it was in 1957. That's when this movie first appeared — and was promptly banned in France for 18 years because of its savage debunking of the conduct of the French army in World War I. Kubrick uses a suicide mission to expose civilized European savagery. He gives us military stupidity in microcosm with this tale of autocratic leaders ( Adolphe Menjou, George Macready)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
David Simon has repaid a long-held literary debt — with interest. On Tuesday, Penguin Classics reissues "Paths of Glory," Humphrey Cobb's surgically sharp novel of the First World War. To Simon, Cobb's 1935 rendering of a doomed French assault and its calamitous aftermath has repercussions that go beyond its immediate anti-war themes. He hears Cobb's characters every time he listens to BP executives trying to explain destructive actions taken for short-term gains. And when bureaucrats assess Hurricane Katrina with "we all did our best" cliches, they remind him of French generals rationalizing the debacles of Verdun.
NEWS
By Emma Brown, The Washington Post | April 22, 2010
Bernard Simon, who served for more than 20 years as public relations director for the Jewish humanitarian organization B'nai B'rith International, died April 20 at his home in Olney of complications from spinal stenosis. He was 89. Mr. Simon's death was confirmed by son David Simon, a former Baltimore Sun reporter and creator of the HBO TV series "The Wire" and "Treme." Early in his career, Bernard Simon was a freelance journalist who wrote for the Saturday Evening Post, Coronet magazine and the Toronto Star.
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