Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDavid Simon
IN THE NEWS

David Simon

NEWS
By David Simon, Special to The Sun | March 11, 2012
Seven-baker-twenty-four unit turns at Mosher and rumbles past that stretch of Appleton Street where Gene Cassidy took two in the head for the company, the first one stealing his eyesight, the second lodging in his brain beyond the skill of a surgeon's knife. Cassidy was 27 then, not even four years on the job, strong and lucky and hard-headed Irish enough that he refused to do the obvious and inevitable thing. He did not die. At University Hospital that night, the other patrol officers and detectives were told it was certain, that their friend would not make it. But Cassidy breathes still, and Appleton and Mosher looks much as it did in October 1987, when Cassidy tumbled out of his radio car to jack up a man wanted on an assault warrant.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
"Diner" has resonated with Baltimore-connected writers and moviemakers across the popular and literary spectrum. Here are some of their reactions to the movie's 30th anniversary. The film "shined a light on a time in Baltimore that I was not that familiar with, much the same as my earlier movies may have done to Barry. We later discussed the fact that even though Barry and I grew up five Beltway exits away from each other, I never met a Jewish person until high school and he told me he didn't realize everybody wasn't a Jew until about the same time in his youth.
NEWS
August 19, 2011
The pros of Baltimore's visionary Gran Prix IndyCar race are plentiful, while the cons are petty and inconsequential. If Baltimore can alter the "Homicide" image popularized by David Simon's successful book and television series, we'll be ahead of the game no matter how much of a profit the event ends up making. Baltimore has really lost its luster among people we met during recent trips abroad and out west -- even in Denver, where they have done a beautiful job in successfully duplicating our downtown stadiums and Harborplace attractions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2011
We finally figured out why David Simon couldn't see the comments he posted to an item on my blog while everyone he contacted at The Sun could. Turns out that after reading my blog on The Sun's website and successfully posting comments there, Simon later found an archived version through a Google search. This archived version lives on after the story fades from The Sun's site, but it's not possible to add comments to that version. And that version did not include any comments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 14, 2011
And now, a follow-up email from David Simon: Comments no longer appear on my screen, or on my wife's, or on the office computer.  Nor is there a link to comments, which appeared there yesterday evening.  Very strange.  I've tried to call it up on three separate computers and no link.  If they are back now, they are back after an absence.  I haven't checked. As to your characterization of your item and its intent, Ms. Vozzella, I can't agree.  By omission, you have implied, with all vigor, that I have let the MacArthur stuff go to my head and have made a demand of the AG that is steeped in arrogance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 14, 2011
David Simon thinks I zapped comments he posted to an item on my blog, about his offer to do another season of "The Wire" if Attorney General Eric Holder stops the war on drugs. I'm sure a MacArthur "genius" like David Simon can figure out how to post a comment. But I can assure you that I did not delete his comments. I'm not even sure how to do that since I am new to p2p blog software and not a genius, MacArthur or otherwise. Simon complains in an email that I didn't make it clear in my original blog post that his offer to the attorney general was tongue-in-cheek.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and By Luke Broadwater | May 31, 2011
The Obama administration has some very pressing matters on its hands: Three overseas wars, an economy struggling to recover and a massive budget shortfall.  So, what are administration officials spending their time doing? Why, ordering more episodes of "The Wire," of course.  Earlier today, Attorney General Eric Holder met with three of the show's actors -- Wendell Pierce (“Bunk”), Sonja Sohn (“Kima”) and Jim True-Frost (“Prez”) -- as part of a forum about preventing child abuse.  But, according to Reuters , Holder couldn't resist issuing an order to the Baltimore-based show's writers, David Simon and Ed Burns, for more content:  “I want to speak directly to Mr. Burns and Mr. Simon: Do another season of 'The Wire',” Holder said, drawing laughter and applause from the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
Man up, David Simon. You might be a fearless journalist, trailblazing TV creator and certified genius. But a couple of young hipsters from Seattle have discovered your dark secret. In the special collections department of the University of Washington, Sean Michael Robinson and Joy Delyria have located the obscure British masterpiece that made your name: Horatio Bucklesby Ogden's 1840s serial about mid-19th-century urban life, "The Wire," published in 10 30-page installments over a half-dozen years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
Felicia "Snoop" Pearson has spent much of the past two decades drawn to the gritty glamour of life on the streets, and nearly as much time and energy struggling to break free. Critics will see the arrest of the 30-year-old Baltimore actress on Thursday on drug charges as evidence that she's a career criminal — an image that only was heightened by her portrayal of a cold-blooded assassin on HBO's "The Wire. " But Pearson's friends, and there are many, are profoundly saddened by her latest run-in with police.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2011
What follows is a personal statement from David Simon, Creator and Executive Producer of "The Wire" (and currently in production on "Treme"). First of all, Felicia's entitled to the presumption of innocence. And I would note that a previous, but recent drug arrest that targeted her was later found to be unwarranted and the charges were dropped. Nonetheless, I'm certainly sad at the news today. This young lady has, from her earliest moments, had one of the hardest lives imaginable.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.