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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
Is Marc Steiner smarter than Denise Koch? Can the president of Baltimore's City Council outwit the president of a local college? Are any of them brainier than your average sixth grader? Baltimore will find out Saturday when local celebrities play "Are You Smarter Than a Sixth Grader?" for a good cause -- raising money for the Sisters Academy of Baltimore, a tuition-free Catholic middle school for girls from low-income neighborhoods. It will be just like the television show, except the personalities will compete with real sixth graders in teams.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that a lawsuit brought against the Baltimore Police Department and three officers by a man who says he was wrongfully convicted of murder in a 1987 killing can proceed. James Owens was charged in the robbery, rape and murder of 24-year-old phone company employee and college student Colleen Williar in her Southeast Baltimore home. According to court records, Owens came under suspicion when a neighbor of Williar's, James Thompson, told police he found a knife outside Williar's apartment and retrieved it on behalf of Owens, a friend.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 1, 2006
The cresting talents of Gretchen Mol, fresh off the personal success of The Notorious Bettie Page, and Cameron Bright, the child actor who provided a controversial cure for mutants in X-Men: The Last Stand, converge in Baltimore this month for the filming of a low-budget independent movie, Boy of Pigs -- a play on the Bay of Pigs. Set in 1963, in the swirl of glamour and intrigue that turned President John F. Kennedy's Washington into Camelot, the movie traces the coming of age of a lonely 13-year-old Catholic school boy. Bright (also memorable in Thank You for Smoking)
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1995
In the halls of the Baltimore School for the Arts, the waves of teen-agers -- some with the graceful walks of dancers, or paint-spattered clothing, or musical instruments in hand -- part for David Simon as though for Moses in the Red Sea."Mr. Simon, did you hear me? I got that job!""Mr. Simon, I got that part.""Hey. Hey. Mr. Simon, what's happenin'?"Of necessity, Mr. Simon makes his way slowly. Sometimes he stops to chat, sometimes not, but he carefully answers each remark -- always with respect, usually with a name.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 29, 2007
Two people who've made great careers out of Baltimore's dark side - best-selling mystery novelist Laura Lippman and Wire creator David Simon - chose a third for their preacher when they tied the knot. The Rev. John Waters presided. It wasn't the first time that the director, who stars as The Groom Reaper in a Court TV show about marriages gone murderously wrong, has officiated at a wedding. "I've done it 13 times, and only one couple's been divorced," Waters said. Pretty good track record, considering that so many marriages end in divorce - and that Waters got into the wedding biz for one that never even happened.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | May 16, 2008
You live by the biceps, you die by the biceps. The good news for Martin O'Malley: A national magazine has put him on one of those lists of top governors. The bad news: The magazine is Playboy. Playboy Radio - who knew there was such a thing? - "held a panel discussion with some high-priced Los Angeles call girls," says the June issue of the girlie mag. "We asked them to rate some notable govs (and ex-govs) on a scale of 'doability.'" O'Malley ranked fifth, behind California's Arnold Schwarzenegger, Florida's Jeb Bush, Michigan's Jennifer Granholm and Iowa's Chet Culver.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
When Anthony Bourdain brings his Guts & Glory tour to the Hippodrome on Saturday, it will be a return engagement for the notoriously opinionated "chef-at-large". Bourdain launched the Hippodrome 's annual Foodie Experience series in May 2010, when he shared the theater's stage with his friend, Eric Ripert. This time, Bourdain is working solo, but when we spoke with him in late September, he said that he's grown increasingly comfortable being on the stage. "I'm looking forward to it, "Bourdain said, "I've been doing [stage shows]
NEWS
By LeRoy Panek | July 8, 1991
HOMICIDE: A Year on the Killing Streets. By David Simon. Houghton Mifflin. 599 pages. $24.95. NO DOUBT, more people can recount the details of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo than can name even one historically important police officer.History books and school curricula universally ignore the police. Teddy Roosevelt: Rough Rider, big-game hunter, president, Bull Moose candidate, but who knows that he was also a reform police commissioner? Who cares?Closer to home, look for an entry about these "bad boys," the police, in the index of Robert J. Brugger's massive "Maryland, A Middle Temperament: 1634-1980," and you will come up empty: "Poles" and "Political culture" are both listed, but not "Police."
FEATURES
October 22, 1995
'Heavy Into Metal'Editor: The shocking revelations of theft and destruction reported in the Sun Magazine on Sept. 3 ["Heavy Into Metal"] reveal a city out of control that is pandering to thieves and drug addicts. Many years ago, a businessman told me that anyone who buys stolen goods causes the thief to steal again. David Simon's article proves the point. As long as any company or individual will pay for the stolen scrap metal, the stealing will continue.Obviously the system needs to be changed.
NEWS
By Zofia Smardz | June 16, 1991
HOMICIDE: A YEARON THE KILLING STREETS.David Simon.Houghton Mifflin.599 pages. $24.95. If you loved "Hill Street Blues," have read all of Joseph Wambaugh and Ed McBain, and even sneak an occasional peek at the reality-based cops and mystery shows so popular on TV, then David Simon's "Homicide" is for you. This slick, fast-paced account of a year in the life of a big-city police department homicide unit is as dramatic as any network shoot-'em-up, as haunting...
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