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David Simon

BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
The publisher of The Daily Record announced Thursday that a former editor at several Maryland newspapers will become editor of the Baltimore-based business and legal affairs newspaper on Jan. 14. David B. Simon, 36, will replace Tom Linthicum, who retired as vice president and executive editor in December, The Daily Record reported. Simon, who most recently worked for the University of Chicago's fundraising arm as a senior writer in medicine and biological sciences, had been managing editor for news and opinion at The Gazette in Gaithersburg until June, The Daily Record said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
At 7 p.m. Saturday in MICA's Brown Center, David Simon, the creator of "The Wire," will host Stanley Kubrick's "Paths of Glory" and explain why it's just as pertinent and powerful today as it was in 1957. That's when this movie first appeared — and was promptly banned in France for 18 years because of its savage debunking of the conduct of the French army in World War I. Kubrick uses a suicide mission to expose civilized European savagery. He gives us military stupidity in microcosm with this tale of autocratic leaders ( Adolphe Menjou, George Macready)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 15, 2002
It looks as if Baltimore is going to be back in prime time. As early as next month, HBO is expected to begin filming a new weekly police drama here that will mean at least 100 new jobs and more than $20 million to the area economy. While an official announcement is not expected until tomorrow in Los Angeles on the Winter Press Tour, The Sun has confirmed that HBO will order 13 episodes of The Wire, a crime drama from David Simon, Emmy Award-winning writer-producer of NBC's Homicide: Life on the Street and HBO's The Corner.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
A few years back, Nathan “Bodie” Barksdale had a public spat with “The Wire” creator David Simon over the extent to which he was an inspiration for drug boss Avon Barksdale in the series. All the while, he vowed that he was long out of the game. But now the Drug Enforcement Administration says Barksdale is a high-ranking member of the Black Guerrilla Family. U.S. marshals arrested him this week on federal heroin and gun charges after he spent a short spell on the run. Barksdale, 52, is accused of taking part in a heroin conspiracy with alleged drug supplier Suraj Tairu, who is also charged in the case.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 7, 2003
Over the course of a 40-year professional career he has been a musician, composer, conductor, educator and nationally renowned arts administrator. But now the founding director of the Baltimore School for the Arts, who retired in 1996 after leading the school through its first 16 years of existence, is debuting in an entirely new role: David Simon, American realist painter. Today, the latest career evolution of the 78-year-old musician-turned-painter will be celebrated at the Baltimore School for the Arts with an opening reception for a benefit exhibition of more than 80 of Simon's realistic oil paintings and watercolors.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
Former Baltimore Sun crime reporter and creator of "The Wire" David Simon is placing the blame for Baltimore's violence spike on State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein, citing the effects of what Simon says is an unwillingness on the top prosecutor's part to take tough cases. After Simon wrote a blog post last year that accused Bernstein of holding up the charging process and breaking a campaign promise, resulting in a dramatic drop in murder cases pursued, a commenter asked Simon to revisit the argument and apologize if 2012's uptick in murders proved to be an aberration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | May 12, 2002
In a gritty West Baltimore neighborhood, in a courtyard where broken glass competes with tufts of grass for space, a teen-age boy sits quietly in a chair, peering intently at a small toy in his hand, oblivious to the rest of the world. Without warning, an empty whiskey bottle is hurled at the wall behind him, shattering within inches of his ear and jolting him out of his trance. A few yards away, another, older youth screams at him to pay attention, cursing in the epithet-filled street language not taught in schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
David Simon has repaid a long-held literary debt — with interest. On Tuesday, Penguin Classics reissues "Paths of Glory," Humphrey Cobb's surgically sharp novel of the First World War. To Simon, Cobb's 1935 rendering of a doomed French assault and its calamitous aftermath has repercussions that go beyond its immediate anti-war themes. He hears Cobb's characters every time he listens to BP executives trying to explain destructive actions taken for short-term gains. And when bureaucrats assess Hurricane Katrina with "we all did our best" cliches, they remind him of French generals rationalizing the debacles of Verdun.
FEATURES
By KEN FUSON and KEN FUSON,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1997
David Simon knows the rules. He has been a journalist a long time. You do what it takes, you get the story, and then you walk away.Otherwise you get too close. Otherwise you're bailing sources out of jail, or finding jobs for people, or listening as some card-carrying member of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters chews on you:"You're going to have to do something about DeAndre.""What'd he do?""He's been mouthing off to Kenny. He'd better watch it. Kenny'll let him have it.""I'll talk to him."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
De'Andre L. McCullough, the young protagonist of the book “The Corner”, which chronicled a year on a drug-plagued street corner in West Baltimore and was turned into an HBO miniseries, died Wednesday of an apparent overdose in Baltimore County, according to police and relatives. It marked the end of a long struggle with addiction for McCullough, 35, who showed promise of getting his life on track but was being sought at the time of his death on warrants charging him with two armed robberies at Baltimore pharmacies, police said.
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