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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith , tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
In 1992, David Sedaris rose - almost elf-like, you might say - into the spotlight by reading from his essay "The Santaland Diaries" on NPR's Morning Edition. With his soft-grained voice and disarmingly understated style of delivery, Sedaris broke a lot of people up recounting his experiences at Macy's in New York, dressed as one of Santa's helpers, guiding kids and their control-freaky parents toward the place where Christmas gift wishes could be expressed and, at least theoretically, granted.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When Baltimore writer Rafael Alvarez was driving around the country peddling his books, he sold a collection of his newspaper articles and short stories to a drunken farmer in a men's room outside Memphis, Tenn. He's spent countless nights sleeping in his truck. He's traded a book for a meal. A good day is when he ekes out just enough money to buy enough gas to get him to the next town - and that's assuming he doesn't run into an ice storm. So what would Alvarez consider to be a not-so-good day on the road?
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By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
In 1992, David Sedaris rose - almost elf-like, you might say - into the spotlight by reading from his essay "The Santaland Diaries" on NPR's Morning Edition. With his soft-grained voice and disarmingly understated style of delivery, Sedaris broke a lot of people up recounting his experiences at Macy's in New York, dressed as one of Santa's helpers, guiding kids and their control-freaky parents toward the place where Christmas gift wishes could be expressed and, at least theoretically, granted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Jaskot, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
It's not too early to start compiling your summer reading list. Here are some recommendations, courtesy of the Enoch Pratt Free Library , with publication dates. Fiction Sophie Kinsella, "Wedding Night": An unlikely romance involves a pair desperate to keep a couple from getting married. April 23 Charlaine Harris, "Dead Ever After": The Southern waitress with paranormal powers, Sookie Stackhouse, who inspired the "True Blood" series, has her grand finale in the end to this series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Jaskot, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
It's not too early to start compiling your summer reading list. Here are some recommendations, courtesy of the Enoch Pratt Free Library , with publication dates. Fiction Sophie Kinsella, "Wedding Night": An unlikely romance involves a pair desperate to keep a couple from getting married. April 23 Charlaine Harris, "Dead Ever After": The Southern waitress with paranormal powers, Sookie Stackhouse, who inspired the "True Blood" series, has her grand finale in the end to this series.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | May 14, 2008
No matter what profession you choose in life, if you like your job, at some point your co-workers start to feel less like the people whose desks abut yours and more like a part of your extended family. You share countless lunches, they get invited to your wedding, and they stand in your kitchen with a smile, a drink in hand, the first time you celebrate the fact that you scraped together enough money to buy your first house. The Sun lost a member of its extended family last weekend, and though he was probably just a byline to many of you who follow the sports section, Christian Ewell will be remembered by many of us as one of the most genuine, kind, loyal and fun individuals most of us ever had the privilege to call a friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When Baltimore writer Rafael Alvarez was driving around the country peddling his books, he sold a collection of his newspaper articles and short stories to a drunken farmer in a men's room outside Memphis, Tenn. He's spent countless nights sleeping in his truck. He's traded a book for a meal. A good day is when he ekes out just enough money to buy enough gas to get him to the next town - and that's assuming he doesn't run into an ice storm. So what would Alvarez consider to be a not-so-good day on the road?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
If you're going to see and hear David Sedaris read at the Meyerhoff on Sunday, keep this in mind: He'll most likely be watching you, too. "He goes on these tours and will read stories that he's working on, and I think there is a kind of feedback that he gets from the audience," says Geoff Kloske, who published Sedaris' first books for Little, Brown. His longtime agent Steve Barclay agrees that the tour is part of Sedaris' creative process. Sedaris is the best-selling author of six books, including Me Talk Pretty One Day and, most recently, Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim.
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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
Catheters and Anne Tyler, autopsies and Flannery O'Connor, bird-eating bullfrogs from Arizona and hairy-handed doctors from any city, U.S.A. In other words, lunch with David Sedaris. The former elf in Macy's Santaland who became a best-selling author and National Public Radio essayist was in town this week not promoting his latest collection of promiscuously witty short stories. "Me Talk Pretty One Day" (Little, Brown $22.95) is in bookstores, but Sedaris actually hawks other writers' books at his own signings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 28, 2000
"Me Talk Pretty One Day" by David Sedaris (Little Brown, 272 pages, $22.95) Anybody who has read any of David Sedaris's three previous collections of essays ("Naked" seems best known) does not need persuasion to move upward and onward to his latest. He is one of the most artfully funny -- and funnily artful -- writers in America. This grouping of memoir-essays is irresistable -- full of the sort of stuff that made me want to go grab someone to read bits aloud to. He is Kafkaesque in dealing with speech therapy.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith , tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
In 1992, David Sedaris rose - almost elf-like, you might say - into the spotlight by reading from his essay "The Santaland Diaries" on NPR's Morning Edition. With his soft-grained voice and disarmingly understated style of delivery, Sedaris broke a lot of people up recounting his experiences at Macy's in New York, dressed as one of Santa's helpers, guiding kids and their control-freaky parents toward the place where Christmas gift wishes could be expressed and, at least theoretically, granted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
In 1992, David Sedaris rose - almost elf-like, you might say - into the spotlight by reading from his essay "The Santaland Diaries" on NPR's Morning Edition. With his soft-grained voice and disarmingly understated style of delivery, Sedaris broke a lot of people up recounting his experiences at Macy's in New York, dressed as one of Santa's helpers, guiding kids and their control-freaky parents toward the place where Christmas gift wishes could be expressed and, at least theoretically, granted.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | May 14, 2008
No matter what profession you choose in life, if you like your job, at some point your co-workers start to feel less like the people whose desks abut yours and more like a part of your extended family. You share countless lunches, they get invited to your wedding, and they stand in your kitchen with a smile, a drink in hand, the first time you celebrate the fact that you scraped together enough money to buy your first house. The Sun lost a member of its extended family last weekend, and though he was probably just a byline to many of you who follow the sports section, Christian Ewell will be remembered by many of us as one of the most genuine, kind, loyal and fun individuals most of us ever had the privilege to call a friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
If you're going to see and hear David Sedaris read at the Meyerhoff on Sunday, keep this in mind: He'll most likely be watching you, too. "He goes on these tours and will read stories that he's working on, and I think there is a kind of feedback that he gets from the audience," says Geoff Kloske, who published Sedaris' first books for Little, Brown. His longtime agent Steve Barclay agrees that the tour is part of Sedaris' creative process. Sedaris is the best-selling author of six books, including Me Talk Pretty One Day and, most recently, Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
Catheters and Anne Tyler, autopsies and Flannery O'Connor, bird-eating bullfrogs from Arizona and hairy-handed doctors from any city, U.S.A. In other words, lunch with David Sedaris. The former elf in Macy's Santaland who became a best-selling author and National Public Radio essayist was in town this week not promoting his latest collection of promiscuously witty short stories. "Me Talk Pretty One Day" (Little, Brown $22.95) is in bookstores, but Sedaris actually hawks other writers' books at his own signings.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 6, 2008
I Was Told There'd Be Cake By Sloane Crosley "I have never met two people more afraid of their house burning down than my parents," writes Crosley. "Please note my parents are not afraid of burning their house down. ... To them the threat is always an outside force - a neighbor's errant flame-thrower, a burglar who smokes, or, in all likelihood, a youngest child." The essays in this exquisite collection, Crosley's first, spin around a young woman's growing up and her first experiences in a big city.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2007
Had it with the holidays? Fed up with colored lights and glitter? The Santaland Diaries is a good antidote to seasonal overload. It is a funny but cynical one-man show that takes a nontraditional look at holiday traditions. Rep Stage mounted a production of it last year, and enough Scrooges enjoyed it to persuade the company to bring it back for another run. About 15 years ago, humorist David Sedaris, then an aspiring actor in New York, landed a job as an elf in the Christmas spectacle at Macy's department store.
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