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By John Anderson and John Anderson,Newsday | April 3, 2008
There are Friends of Bill, Friends of Dorothy and Friends - from which David Schwimmer will probably never entirely escape, although he's doing his best: Run Fat Boy Run, the actor's big-screen directorial debut, is in theaters, with Simon Pegg (Hot Fuzz) playing a working-class London shlub trying to win back the woman he left pregnant at the altar (Thandie Newton). Did you know Fat Boy's screenwriter, Michael Ian Black, from Chicago? No, but I was a fan of his from a show called The State.
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By John Anderson and John Anderson,Newsday | April 3, 2008
There are Friends of Bill, Friends of Dorothy and Friends - from which David Schwimmer will probably never entirely escape, although he's doing his best: Run Fat Boy Run, the actor's big-screen directorial debut, is in theaters, with Simon Pegg (Hot Fuzz) playing a working-class London shlub trying to win back the woman he left pregnant at the altar (Thandie Newton). Did you know Fat Boy's screenwriter, Michael Ian Black, from Chicago? No, but I was a fan of his from a show called The State.
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By Diane Werts | November 8, 2007
30 Rock is rolling. After the season premiere with Jerry Seinfeld, tonight's sweeps episode lures another key player from NBC's late great '90s Thursday night "must-see TV" block in David Schwimmer. As did Seinfeld, the Friends star manages to serve two masters - bald-faced hype and sly humor - by guest-starring as eco-mascot Greenzo, the latest greatest idea from Alec Baldwin's loopy GE/NBC execubot. At least Schwimmer isn't promoting himself as a product. (Something about some flying insect movie, wasn't it?
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By Diane Werts | November 8, 2007
30 Rock is rolling. After the season premiere with Jerry Seinfeld, tonight's sweeps episode lures another key player from NBC's late great '90s Thursday night "must-see TV" block in David Schwimmer. As did Seinfeld, the Friends star manages to serve two masters - bald-faced hype and sly humor - by guest-starring as eco-mascot Greenzo, the latest greatest idea from Alec Baldwin's loopy GE/NBC execubot. At least Schwimmer isn't promoting himself as a product. (Something about some flying insect movie, wasn't it?
NEWS
By Sandy Coleman and Sandy Coleman,BOSTON GLOBE | May 12, 1996
As if they haven't done enough by showing up in soda commercials, in badly imitated hairstyles and in movies, the stars of NBC's "Friends" show up everywhere this month in magazines.There is David Schwimmer in Vogue talking about how he got from television to film. Courteney Cox is in Redbook denying the rumors that she is bulimic and as neurotic as her TV character. Lisa Kudrow shows off her style in Elle. And the actress who plays the character with the haircut everyone is copying shows up by way of a 1971 photo of actor David Cassidy (ex-"Partridge Family" member)
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1995
It's my first interview with a monkey.At least it's sort of a famous monkey. It's Katie, the backup monkey for Monkey, who plays Marcel on NBC's hit sitcom "Friends" (9:30 p.m. Thursdays on WBAL, Channel 11). Tonight, Marcel leaves the show, but Katie doesn't seem to mind. And fortunately, her trainer, Nerissa Politzer, is happy to supply the details that Katie's "eek eek eek!" can't convey.Katie doesn't talk much on the phone, apparently. "She'll chew on the phone sometimes," Ms. Politzer volunteers from Bob Dunn Animal Services in Sylmar, Calif.
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By DAVID ZURAWIK | April 19, 1998
Meet the woman of the year - or, at least, the most interesting female character of the TV season - in Cordelia Gray when PBS premieres P.D. James' "An Unsuitable Job for a Woman: Sacrifice" Thursday night on the "Mystery!" series.Helen Baxendale, who plays Cordelia, is also the girlfriend of Ross (David Schwimmer) on NBC's "Friends."Cordelia is young, smart and complicated, the kind of woman who isn't supposed to exist on television.But for the next five Thursdays at 9 p.m., she's all ours, and she's marvelous.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 3, 1996
Now take David Schwimmer -- please.Take him to Cincinnati. No, take him to Osaka. No, wait, take him to Smolensk, wherever that is.But take him out of the movie theaters, at least until the grown-ups control them again.Schwimmer, I am reliably informed, is a charming presence on "Friends," where his schlumpy nerdliness is a minor comic note in the melody which is that show's ensemble. In "The Pallbearer," he's the whole damn tuba and a more gratingly annoying persona hasn't been around since Moe tried to make it on his own in "The One Stooge."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 19, 1997
The FX cable channel makes its bid to become a power in prime-time television tonight, with exclusive repeats (airing in the order in which they were originally broadcast) of two of TV's most powerful dramas.First comes "The X-Files" (8 p.m.-9 p.m.), with the series' 1993 premiere. The ever-skeptical Scully (Gillian Anderson) is assigned by her FBI superiors to keep an eye on Agent Mulder (David Duchovny), whose career has been devoted to solving the bureau's unexplained cases -- known collectively as the X-files, and largely having to do with the paranormal, extraterrestrials and the like.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 16, 1995
It's the start of March Madness, a k a the NCAA basketball championships, which some people avoid and other people dive into -- dive as in pool. My easy tip, for people who want to enter the office pool but don't know a double dribble from a dribble glass: When choosing which of two teams will beat the other, always go with the one that comes first in the alphabet. This year, for example, that puts Alabama vs. Arizona in the finals.* "NCAA basketball championships" (noon-5 p.m., 7:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Channel 13)
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | May 18, 2003
It's not easy to pull off pink. But the new KitchenAid Artisan Stand Mixer ($249) shows the color in all its glory. And it couldn't be prettier. Among the various kitchenware items in the new Williams-Sonoma spring catalog is the mixer, which features planetary action and a tilting head that allows for easy removal of the bowl and beater. And while the mixer comes in an array of colors, if you buy it in pink, KitchenAid will donate $50 to the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. Other novel items in the spring catalog include the Rose Bundt Pan (above, $29)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | December 29, 2002
When NBC announced this week that it had found a way to bring its hit sitcom Friends back for a 10th season, I wasn't that impressed. In fact, I thought it was probably a bad thing for network television that NBC was breaking the bank trying to squeeze another season out of this series about six young adults living more or less near each other in New York. I say "more or less" because Chandler (Matthew Perry) was transferred to Oklahoma this season and has been commuting back to New York on weekends to be with his wife, Monica (Courteney Cox)
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK | April 19, 1998
Meet the woman of the year - or, at least, the most interesting female character of the TV season - in Cordelia Gray when PBS premieres P.D. James' "An Unsuitable Job for a Woman: Sacrifice" Thursday night on the "Mystery!" series.Helen Baxendale, who plays Cordelia, is also the girlfriend of Ross (David Schwimmer) on NBC's "Friends."Cordelia is young, smart and complicated, the kind of woman who isn't supposed to exist on television.But for the next five Thursdays at 9 p.m., she's all ours, and she's marvelous.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 19, 1997
The FX cable channel makes its bid to become a power in prime-time television tonight, with exclusive repeats (airing in the order in which they were originally broadcast) of two of TV's most powerful dramas.First comes "The X-Files" (8 p.m.-9 p.m.), with the series' 1993 premiere. The ever-skeptical Scully (Gillian Anderson) is assigned by her FBI superiors to keep an eye on Agent Mulder (David Duchovny), whose career has been devoted to solving the bureau's unexplained cases -- known collectively as the X-files, and largely having to do with the paranormal, extraterrestrials and the like.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1997
With five seasons behind it, it's time to say goodbye to Fox's "Martin." Tonight, an erstwhile (and litigious) cast member returns for the final curtain."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
The return of "ER"? Praise the lord and turn on the TV. Stat!"High Incident" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- What to do about illegal aliens is tonight's theme, as a traffic accident reveals an illegal immigrant smuggling ring. Marsh (David Keith) is accused of brutalizing one of them, while Mike and Jesse (Blair Underwood and Lisa Vidal) debate the philosophical side. ABC."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Ross (David Schwimmer) wants everybody to attend his black-tie museum benefit, but Monica (Courteney Cox)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1995
Jessica Fletcher (Angela Lansbury) faces a tough case -- a killer new time slot for "Murder She Wrote" -- while NBC tinkers with its Thursday lineup, adding two new single-person-syndrome sitcoms plus season premieres of "Friends," "Seinfeld" and "ER."* "Murder She Wrote" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) Fans of the series beginning its 12th season are crying foul as the network moves the show from Sunday to this perilous time period, premiering tonight against the mega-hit "Friends." But the star has said she expects devotees of the mild-mannered mystery to follow her to the new night.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1995
Murder times three! That's the lineup tonight, a murder mystery every hour including: "Murder, She Wrote," "Murder On the Links" and just plain "Murder One."* "Murder, She Wrote" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Ah, now wouldn't you think Ballynook Castle in colorful Ireland sounds like the perfect place for a vacation? So does Jessica (Angela Lansbury) -- until she's locked in an ancient dungeon and experiences her own ghost story. CBS.* "Star-Crossed Thursday" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
NEWS
By Sandy Coleman and Sandy Coleman,BOSTON GLOBE | May 12, 1996
As if they haven't done enough by showing up in soda commercials, in badly imitated hairstyles and in movies, the stars of NBC's "Friends" show up everywhere this month in magazines.There is David Schwimmer in Vogue talking about how he got from television to film. Courteney Cox is in Redbook denying the rumors that she is bulimic and as neurotic as her TV character. Lisa Kudrow shows off her style in Elle. And the actress who plays the character with the haircut everyone is copying shows up by way of a 1971 photo of actor David Cassidy (ex-"Partridge Family" member)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 3, 1996
Now take David Schwimmer -- please.Take him to Cincinnati. No, take him to Osaka. No, wait, take him to Smolensk, wherever that is.But take him out of the movie theaters, at least until the grown-ups control them again.Schwimmer, I am reliably informed, is a charming presence on "Friends," where his schlumpy nerdliness is a minor comic note in the melody which is that show's ensemble. In "The Pallbearer," he's the whole damn tuba and a more gratingly annoying persona hasn't been around since Moe tried to make it on his own in "The One Stooge."
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