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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 1, 2003
Good Fences is good satire. The Showtime film from executive producer Spike Lee tells the story of an upwardly mobile African-American couple played with wit and wisdom by Danny Glover and Whoopi Goldberg, as they move through the 1970s. At the heart of the drama is their arrival in Greenwich, Conn., after he wins a promotion at his law firm for successfully defending a white man who set a black vagrant on fire. One of the biggest problems in their life comes not from white racism but rather the arrival of an African-American lottery winner played by Mo'Nique (The Parkers)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Baltimorean David Simon, whose groundbreaking television series "The Wire" examined the institutions of his hometown with a passionate and unsparing eye, today won a 2010 MacArthur "genius" award. The 50-year-old Simon is one of only a few people ever to receive one of the prestigious fellowships for work in television. The MacArthur carries a $500,000, no-strings-attached grant parceled out over five years. "The great value of this award is that it will make it easier for all of us to argue for stories that might not otherwise be perceived as popular television," Simon said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Baltimorean David Simon, whose groundbreaking television series "The Wire" examined the institutions of his hometown with a passionate and unsparing eye, today won a 2010 MacArthur "genius" award. The 50-year-old Simon is one of only a few people ever to receive one of the prestigious fellowships for work in television. The MacArthur carries a $500,000, no-strings-attached grant parceled out over five years. "The great value of this award is that it will make it easier for all of us to argue for stories that might not otherwise be perceived as popular television," Simon said.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 31, 2010
David Mills, a two-time Emmy winner and writer on the Baltimore-set TV series "Homicide: Life On the Street" and "The Wire," died yesterday in New Orleans, the New Orleans Time-Picayune is reporting. Mills, a former newspaper feature writer, was in New Orleans as a writer and co-executive producer of "Treme," a new HBO series set to debut next month. All three series have highlighted the work of Maryland native David Simon, a former Baltimore Sun reporter. Mills' collapsed on the set of "Treme" Tuesday afternoon, according to a report on investigativevoice.
NEWS
By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com | March 31, 2010
The death of 48-year-old screenwriter David Mills, who won an Emmy for his work on the Baltimore production of HBO's "The Corner," hit members of the Maryland- Hollywood TV and film communities hard yesterday. Mills, who was born in Maryland and started his writing career as a reporter at the University of Maryland student-run newspaper The Diamondback, collapsed Tuesday in New Orleans on the set of the HBO drama "Treme." He died in a New Orleans hospital, according to series creator David Simon.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 31, 2010
David Mills, a two-time Emmy winner and writer on the Baltimore-set TV series "Homicide: Life On the Street" and "The Wire," died yesterday in New Orleans, the New Orleans Time-Picayune is reporting. Mills, a former newspaper feature writer, was in New Orleans as a writer and co-executive producer of "Treme," a new HBO series set to debut next month. All three series have highlighted the work of Maryland native David Simon, a former Baltimore Sun reporter. Mills' collapsed on the set of "Treme" Tuesday afternoon, according to a report on investigativevoice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
This time George Epps would need a few takes to do the scene. This time he would not be the guy checking into the Baltimore homeless shelter, trying to end a lifetime of drug abuse, but the fellow working at the shelter who hands over a blanket and explains the rules. This time Epps would face a dramatized image of his own life, watching his HBO movie self take the blankets and go on his way. Just act natural, they told Epps. Just act natural. "It brought back a lot of memories," says Epps, a recovering addict who appears briefly in "The Corner," a six-part HBO miniseries that begins tonight and runs for six consecutive weeks.
NEWS
August 17, 2003
On August 15, 2003, DAVID L., former owner of Dave's Mobile, Pasadena, MD; beloved husband of Dorothy "Reece" M. Mills (nee Hamby); devoted father of David Ronald Mills, Mary Linda Furrow and Dawn Lee Mills; grandfather of David Ronald Mills, Jr., Sarabeth Mills, Stanley David Furrow, Jr. and Jolie Dawn Furrow; great-grandfather of Livia Nora Falin and Joseph David Allen Furrow; brother of Arnold Mills and Joel Mills, Mary Skinner, Bonnie McSwain and...
NEWS
May 27, 2006
On May 26, 2006, HELEN P; beloved wife of Frank W. Mills, Sr. and devoted mother of Frank W. Mills, Jr., Cynthia L. Briemann and David W. Mills. Also survived by eight grandchildren and loving nieces and nephews. Memorial services will be held on Sunday, June 4, 2006 at 12:30 from St. Lukes Lutheran Church, 806 W. 36th Street, Baltimore, MD 21211. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent in Mrs. Mills name to St. Lukes Lutheran Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 29, 1998
David Mills' one-man show, "The Wedding Banned," was inspired "by my real-life experiences of going to straight weddings of old friends and feeling somehow out of place, alienated and yet deeply envious," according to the San Francisco-based gay performance artist. In the show, which is receiving its East Coast premiere at the Theatre Project, Mills plays characters ranging from his straight friend Sharon, on the eve of her wedding, to Meredith Baxter-Birney and Lee Majors in a made-for-TV movie.
NEWS
By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com | March 31, 2010
The death of 48-year-old screenwriter David Mills, who won an Emmy for his work on the Baltimore production of HBO's "The Corner," hit members of the Maryland- Hollywood TV and film communities hard yesterday. Mills, who was born in Maryland and started his writing career as a reporter at the University of Maryland student-run newspaper The Diamondback, collapsed Tuesday in New Orleans on the set of the HBO drama "Treme." He died in a New Orleans hospital, according to series creator David Simon.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 1, 2003
Good Fences is good satire. The Showtime film from executive producer Spike Lee tells the story of an upwardly mobile African-American couple played with wit and wisdom by Danny Glover and Whoopi Goldberg, as they move through the 1970s. At the heart of the drama is their arrival in Greenwich, Conn., after he wins a promotion at his law firm for successfully defending a white man who set a black vagrant on fire. One of the biggest problems in their life comes not from white racism but rather the arrival of an African-American lottery winner played by Mo'Nique (The Parkers)
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 16, 2000
LOS ANGELES - Aaron Sorkin's "West Wing" was the biggest winner, but one of the most prestigious awards last night at the 16th Annual Television Critics Association Awards ceremony here went to HBO's "The Corner." "The Corner," which was filmed in Baltimore and told the story of a family struggling to escape drug addiction, won the award as Best Movie or Mini-Series. It was based on a nonfiction book of the same title by David Simon and Edward Burns. Simon co-wrote and co-produced the miniseries with David Mills.
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