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By Rachel Marsden | June 14, 2012
The English-teacher son of a Pulitzer Prize winner gave a much-ballyhooed commencement speech recently to students graduating from an American high school that one might categorize as privileged. David McCullough Jr., a teacher at Wellesley High School in Massachusetts and the son of the Pulitzer-winning historian David McCullough, began by comparing the "great forward-looking ceremony" to another kind of ceremony, weddings, before promptly dismissing both as overhyped. It was the first sign that the speech would turn out to be one big reality check.
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | June 14, 2012
The English-teacher son of a Pulitzer Prize winner gave a much-ballyhooed commencement speech recently to students graduating from an American high school that one might categorize as privileged. David McCullough Jr., a teacher at Wellesley High School in Massachusetts and the son of the Pulitzer-winning historian David McCullough, began by comparing the "great forward-looking ceremony" to another kind of ceremony, weddings, before promptly dismissing both as overhyped. It was the first sign that the speech would turn out to be one big reality check.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Raphael and By Ray Raphael,Special to the Sun | May 29, 2005
1776 By David McCullough. Simon & Schuster, 386 pages, $32. Opening Words "On the afternoon of Thursday, October 26, 1775, His Royal Majesty George III, King of England, rode in royal splendor from St. James Palace to the Palace of Westminster, there to address the opening of Parliament on the increasingly distressing issue of war in America." 1776, by David McCullough In Revolutionary days, when people objected to decisions reached in official chambers, they resolved issues on their own "out-of-chambers," as they said at the time.
SPORTS
By Steven Petrella and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
David McCullough Jr. wants his students to stop expecting that everything will be handed to them. He wants the idea of 'everybody gets a trophy' to end. The Wellesley (Mass.) High School English teacher gave a controversial -- yet somewhat needed -- commencement speech entitled 'You Are Not Special.' He advised students to drop the false sense of achievement paradigm that has emerged in modern society and schools. So the relevance here lies in this: He told his students to not be like the Baltimore Orioles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and By Joseph R. L. Sterne,Special to the Sun | May 20, 2001
"John Adams," by David McCullough. Simon & Schuster. 749 pages. $35. Bracketed by those Mount Rushmore colossi, Washington and Jefferson, President John Adams finally gets the laudatory and accessible biography he deserves. For two centuries, he has been criticized, disparaged and often ignored by generations of historians and scribblers -- this despite his prodigious labors in the creation of this republic, No other of our foundation fathers, not a one, can match the breadth of his record as the driving force behind the Declaration of Independence, as chairman of the Board of War in organizing the great rebellion, as a top negotiator in securing Britain's recognition of American freedom and as a president who avoided what could have been a disastrous all-out conflict with France.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | July 2, 2001
NEW YORK - This has not been a great year for Thomas Jefferson. Not only is David McCullough's splendid new biography of Jefferson's great rival, John Adams, the No. 1 best seller in the country, but the Virginian's most celebrated recent biographer, Joseph Ellis, is entangled in a dismaying web of lies about his own life. Then there is the digging up of DNA stories about the man and his slaves. But the man from Monticello, who will prevail in the next turning of the historical wheel did write the best Declaration of Independence that we'll ever read.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1998
America at its last turn of the century was "a big, raw boy, full of robust energy and growing pains." Americans, "exulted by the possibilities" of their country, lived in a world where "cynicism and self-pity were not in style."Thus speaks narrator David McCullough -- and does this guy have the greatest voice in America or what? -- at the opening of "America 1900," tonight's entertainingly ironic 11th-season opener of "The American Experience."In just over 100 years, the United States had turned itself from colony to colonial power, from a nation dependent on an overseas king to a country on the brink of becoming a dominant force in world politics.
SPORTS
By Steven Petrella and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
David McCullough Jr. wants his students to stop expecting that everything will be handed to them. He wants the idea of 'everybody gets a trophy' to end. The Wellesley (Mass.) High School English teacher gave a controversial -- yet somewhat needed -- commencement speech entitled 'You Are Not Special.' He advised students to drop the false sense of achievement paradigm that has emerged in modern society and schools. So the relevance here lies in this: He told his students to not be like the Baltimore Orioles.
FEATURES
September 8, 2001
I hate the way network television cannibalizes its past - repackaging and slicing and dicing its touchstones until they turn to dust. But, as a prequel to the NBC series (1959-1973), The Ponderosa premiering tomorrow night at 9 on the Pax network does not make you want to gag the way, say, Dallas: The Early Years did. The Ponderosa picks up Ben Cartwright and his three sons in 1849 when Ben still had a wife. They were living above a general store in a spit of a dirty little place called Eagle Station in the Nevada Territory, but there was plenty of love and good times to keep their spirits up while Ben and the boys dreamed of owning their own ranch.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Mr. West is Washington bureau chief of The Sun | June 14, 1992
TRUMAN.David McCullough.Simon & Schuster.1,117 pages. $30. The 1980 Republican convention was out of control. From his perch in the CBS anchor booth, Walter Cronkite was brokering a deal that would put former President Gerald R. Ford on the Reagan ticket. At a nearby hotel, George Bush squirmed anxiously in his suite, awaiting a phone call that might never come.During a break in the action, a rookie reporter hurrying down a corridor at the convention hall found himself overtaken by the loping gait of Richard L. Strout, a journalistic legend who'd been covering presidential politics since the days of Warren G. Harding.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Raphael and By Ray Raphael,Special to the Sun | May 29, 2005
1776 By David McCullough. Simon & Schuster, 386 pages, $32. Opening Words "On the afternoon of Thursday, October 26, 1775, His Royal Majesty George III, King of England, rode in royal splendor from St. James Palace to the Palace of Westminster, there to address the opening of Parliament on the increasingly distressing issue of war in America." 1776, by David McCullough In Revolutionary days, when people objected to decisions reached in official chambers, they resolved issues on their own "out-of-chambers," as they said at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and By Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | June 2, 2002
Baltimoreans have been hanging with all sorts of celebrities these days -- beginning at the world premiere of the new flick, The Sum Of All Fears at DC's Warner Theatre a week and a half ago. Local superscribe Tom Clancy -- who wrote the best-selling novel on which the film is based and was executive producer for the movie -- offered a couple hundred tickets to one of his favorite local charities, Johns Hopkins Pediatric Oncology Friends, which sold each...
FEATURES
September 8, 2001
I hate the way network television cannibalizes its past - repackaging and slicing and dicing its touchstones until they turn to dust. But, as a prequel to the NBC series (1959-1973), The Ponderosa premiering tomorrow night at 9 on the Pax network does not make you want to gag the way, say, Dallas: The Early Years did. The Ponderosa picks up Ben Cartwright and his three sons in 1849 when Ben still had a wife. They were living above a general store in a spit of a dirty little place called Eagle Station in the Nevada Territory, but there was plenty of love and good times to keep their spirits up while Ben and the boys dreamed of owning their own ranch.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | July 2, 2001
NEW YORK - This has not been a great year for Thomas Jefferson. Not only is David McCullough's splendid new biography of Jefferson's great rival, John Adams, the No. 1 best seller in the country, but the Virginian's most celebrated recent biographer, Joseph Ellis, is entangled in a dismaying web of lies about his own life. Then there is the digging up of DNA stories about the man and his slaves. But the man from Monticello, who will prevail in the next turning of the historical wheel did write the best Declaration of Independence that we'll ever read.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and By Joseph R. L. Sterne,Special to the Sun | May 20, 2001
"John Adams," by David McCullough. Simon & Schuster. 749 pages. $35. Bracketed by those Mount Rushmore colossi, Washington and Jefferson, President John Adams finally gets the laudatory and accessible biography he deserves. For two centuries, he has been criticized, disparaged and often ignored by generations of historians and scribblers -- this despite his prodigious labors in the creation of this republic, No other of our foundation fathers, not a one, can match the breadth of his record as the driving force behind the Declaration of Independence, as chairman of the Board of War in organizing the great rebellion, as a top negotiator in securing Britain's recognition of American freedom and as a president who avoided what could have been a disastrous all-out conflict with France.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1998
America at its last turn of the century was "a big, raw boy, full of robust energy and growing pains." Americans, "exulted by the possibilities" of their country, lived in a world where "cynicism and self-pity were not in style."Thus speaks narrator David McCullough -- and does this guy have the greatest voice in America or what? -- at the opening of "America 1900," tonight's entertainingly ironic 11th-season opener of "The American Experience."In just over 100 years, the United States had turned itself from colony to colonial power, from a nation dependent on an overseas king to a country on the brink of becoming a dominant force in world politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and By Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | June 2, 2002
Baltimoreans have been hanging with all sorts of celebrities these days -- beginning at the world premiere of the new flick, The Sum Of All Fears at DC's Warner Theatre a week and a half ago. Local superscribe Tom Clancy -- who wrote the best-selling novel on which the film is based and was executive producer for the movie -- offered a couple hundred tickets to one of his favorite local charities, Johns Hopkins Pediatric Oncology Friends, which sold each...
NEWS
By Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes | June 11, 1995
I just finished 'Visions of the Future: The Distant Past, Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow,' by economist Robert Heilbroner. It was very interesting, about how [people's] expectations of the future have changed. On the lighter side, I'm into 'No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II' and 'Truman' by David McCullough. I've got a whole stack of books waiting for me.- Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, a Maryland Democrat who specializes in economic issues.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Mr. West is Washington bureau chief of The Sun | June 14, 1992
TRUMAN.David McCullough.Simon & Schuster.1,117 pages. $30. The 1980 Republican convention was out of control. From his perch in the CBS anchor booth, Walter Cronkite was brokering a deal that would put former President Gerald R. Ford on the Reagan ticket. At a nearby hotel, George Bush squirmed anxiously in his suite, awaiting a phone call that might never come.During a break in the action, a rookie reporter hurrying down a corridor at the convention hall found himself overtaken by the loping gait of Richard L. Strout, a journalistic legend who'd been covering presidential politics since the days of Warren G. Harding.
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