Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDavid Mamet
IN THE NEWS

David Mamet

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1998
"Three Uses of the Knife: On Nature and Purpose of Drama," by David Mamet. Columbia University Press. 87 pages. $19.95. Why do certain plays get under some people's skin, while others leave them cold? What separates the great movie from the merely good?When something happens to me, why does the experience feel more complete once it's recounted to a friend (ideally over a bottle of good red wine)?The answer - and it turns out that all three questions have the same one - is provided with penetrating intelligence, wit and clarity by the playwright David Mamet in "Three Uses of the Knife: On the Nature and Purpose of Drama," a collection of three interrelated essays in which he explains how dramatic structure operates in art and daily life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
In Harold Pinter's “The Caretaker,” men who seem to have empty centers where their hearts should be engage in a strange dance involving intimidation and entitlement. In David Mamet's “Glengarry Glen Ross,” which the playwright dedicated to Pinter, men with voids where their morals should be thrash about in a desperate game that also involves intimidation and entitlement. These are two very different works, to be sure, but they share some gritty elements, pose similarly tough questions about human nature, and leave us with similarly elusive answers.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 12, 2001
For a guy who makes a pretty good living off Hollywood, David Mamet sure loves biting the hand that feeds him Four years ago, he managed to skew the worlds of both cinema and politics by co-writing "Wag the Dog," a biting political satire that suggested the line between Washington reality and Hollywood unreality can be uncomfortably blurry. And now he's back with "State and Main," a snarling satire of Hollywood single-mindedness and its lack of any moral underpinning. The result is a frequently hilarious look at the lengths to which studios will go to make a movie, a pointed commentary on a society where filmmakers are held in way-too-high esteem and a chance for some fine actors to show that they can take, as well as make, a joke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Executive producer Barry Levinson urges viewers to think of his HBO film "Phil Spector" as a two-person play - not a docudrama about the first murder trial of the rock producer. "It really is a two-person piece," Levinson said in a telephone interview last week. "And if you're looking for some kind of docudrama, which we are more familiar with on television, this isn't it. " The two persons, Academy Award-winners Al Pacino as Spector and Helen Mirren as his defense attorney, Linda Kenney Baden, can fill a screen like few others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
What a great weekend: HBO sent a screener for "Phil Spector," a made-for-TV movie about the legendary music producer, starring Al Pacino and Helen Mirren. Barry Levinson is the executive producer, with David Mamet as writer and director. That enough talent for you? David Mamet, whose "Glengarry Glen Ross" is made of the same fine angry American genius as Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," and he's writing and directing a Sunday-night made-for-television movie on HBO. Talk to me some more about how TV dumbs down the culture.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 27, 1996
There's nothing wrong with "American Buffalo" that a little energy wouldn't have cured. The movie version of the famed David Mamet play turns out to be a glum and dour meander through the slums of the American imagination.We're in what has so lately become a familiar neighborhood: small-time crime and the non-Rhodes Scholars who commit it and, more importantly, see it as a lifestyle. The geniuses-not at the center (and the edges and on top and below and every other conceivable location) of "American Buffalo" are pawnshop owner Don (Dennis Franz)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2003
When Lord Acton warned about the corrupting nature of power, he probably had the political realm in mind. But the lust for power can corrupt personal relationships as well. If you don't believe me, go have a look at Oleanna, the David Mamet play about to enter its third and final weekend of production by the Bay Theatre Company of Annapolis. John is a college professor, an overintellectualized tenure-or-bust windbag enchanted by the force he feels emanating from his many pontifications.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 29, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Two venerable Asian movie detectives, Mr. Moto and Charlie Chan, are being revived, possibly to become lucrative series characters in the profitable mold of James Bond.Producers Gene Kirkwood and John Hyde are developing "The Adventures of Charlie Chan" for Warner Bros., inspired by the detective created by fiction writer Earl Derr Biggers, the subject of some 20 films, most shot in the '30s and early '40s. A series of Caucasian actors portrayed Chan, who spouted pseudo-Chinese philosophy while solving mysteries with his subservient "No. 1 son."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 12, 2004
When he did Wag the Dog, David Mamet parodied the lengths to which modern-day politicians will go in pursuit of power. In Spartan, he's made that pursuit the stuff of nightmares. At its essence, Spartan is the story of a kidnapping, with the president's daughter as the victim. Charged with finding her is Robert Scott (Val Kilmer), a career military man of extreme toughness and force of will -- he's one of those guys who'll do anything he's ordered to do, from mop a floor to murder a civilian, and worry about the moral implications never.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 14, 1991
By now, David Mamet has chalked up considerable experience in Hollywood; he's even got a book out on film directing. But "Speed-the-Plow" dates from the playwright's period of discontent with Tinsel Town. And his discontent is reflected in every scurrilous word.Though hardly Mr. Mamet's most artful script -- it has a hole in the plot big enough to sink Burbank, Calif. -- "Speed-the-Plow" is being performed with slick conviction by the three-member cast at the Spotlighters, where it is receiving its Baltimore debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
What a great weekend: HBO sent a screener for "Phil Spector," a made-for-TV movie about the legendary music producer, starring Al Pacino and Helen Mirren. Barry Levinson is the executive producer, with David Mamet as writer and director. That enough talent for you? David Mamet, whose "Glengarry Glen Ross" is made of the same fine angry American genius as Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," and he's writing and directing a Sunday-night made-for-television movie on HBO. Talk to me some more about how TV dumbs down the culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
Taped to the side of the counter in the junk shop that forms the set for David Mamet's "American Buffalo" at Center Stage is a vintage sign: "People who advocate violence should be shot. " Most people in the audience will never see that sign, or hundreds of other items crammed on and around the stage to recreate in painstaking detail the 1970s junk shop Mamet specifies. But all of those objects have a part in creating the uncomfortably real world of dark humor and dark prospects for the three edgy characters who animate this theater classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2011
The theme of Center Stage 's 2011-2012 season might be summed up as rhythm — from the distinctive beat of "Jazz," a world premiere adapted from the Toni Morrison novel of that name, to the percussive profanity of David Mamet's "American Buffalo"; from the improvised patter of Second City to the intricate rhymes and melodic pulse of Stephen Sondheim's "Into the Woods. " "We're willing not to play it safe," said Center Stage resident dramaturg Gavin Witt, who helped plan the season with what he described as "a think tank" of senior management.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
-- The piece wasn't some naked confession about the difficulties of growing up with cerebral palsy. Instead, Hailey Reissman came at her story from the side, with a twist of humor and a touch of the profane. She called it, "I Have Cerebral Palsy and David Mamet Reveals What I Imagine The Friends Of The Guy I Am Dating Will Say When He Tells Them About Me, In Three Brief Monologues." The title encapsulates the wit and inventiveness that so impressed Reissman's professors at Washington College.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | December 3, 2006
The Wicked Son: Anti-Semitism, Self-Hatred and the Jews David Mamet Schocken Books / 189 pages / $19.95 In the late 20th century, according to Pulitzer prize-winning playwright David Mamet, "a laudable disposition to open-mindedness decayed" into "the cant of freedom," with its "corrosive, indeed, destructive" illusions of choice and autonomy. What Allan Bloom called "the closing of the American Mind," Mamet believes is a "sickness," marked by anxiety, purposelessness, loneliness and loss.
NEWS
By Sun Television Critic | October 8, 2006
Harlem playwright Kia Corthron remembers being told by her University of Maryland, College Park theater professor that serious dramatists would "never write for television." Nonetheless, viewers of HBO's The Wire next month will be able to see an episode of the Peabody Award-winning series scripted by the Cumberland native; and it includes some of the most powerful and touching moments of the series' standout season. Good thing she resisted her instructor's advice "It's different than it used to be - the feeling about TV," says the playwright whose work has been produced in theaters from London to New York.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 18, 1991
''Homicide'' is a movie in need of an ending. We may know what was intended here, but it is not stated clearly enough.''Homicide'' was shot in Baltimore. It was written and directed by David Mamet. Mamet is a product of the '60s. Early in his career, he wrote plays that didn't make much sense but won attention from some critics who went on about the hidden meaning in his plays.In time, Mamet became less abstract. You could actually make sense of what he was writing. He did the script for ''The Untouchables.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 6, 1994
One of the most obvious features distinguishing plays from novels is that in plays, the playwright is restricted to writing dialogue. The characters' inner thoughts are off-limits. And with the exception of stage directions (which the director may choose to ignore), there's no description.David Mamet more than makes up for these limitations in his first novel, "The Village." Set in a rural New England village -- probably not unlike the writer's own adopted Vermont home -- the book focuses on a smattering of local folk, jump-cutting from one to another as they struggle with the mundane activities of their daily lives.
NEWS
August 19, 2006
Don't blame bigotry for Israel's conflicts As a teacher, I will use David Mamet's essay "The catchall solution: First blame the Jews" (Opinion Commentary, Aug. 10) as an example of how an author can distort facts, and use guilt to persuade the reader to believe in a false premise. The premise is that anti-Semitism is the driving force in blame for Israel for the tragedies of the Middle East. And Mr. Mamet tries to convince the reader that Israel is only seeking peace with her neighbors and that the reason she was held responsible by many in the West for the crisis in Lebanon is anti-Semitism.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 12, 2004
When he did Wag the Dog, David Mamet parodied the lengths to which modern-day politicians will go in pursuit of power. In Spartan, he's made that pursuit the stuff of nightmares. At its essence, Spartan is the story of a kidnapping, with the president's daughter as the victim. Charged with finding her is Robert Scott (Val Kilmer), a career military man of extreme toughness and force of will -- he's one of those guys who'll do anything he's ordered to do, from mop a floor to murder a civilian, and worry about the moral implications never.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.