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By New York Times News Service | October 5, 1991
LONDON -- The actors Peter O'Toole, Sir Alec Guinness, Sarah Miles, Tom Courtenay and Omar Sharif were among the 800 people who gathered Thursday at St. Paul's Cathedral to honor Sir David Lean, the director of films including "Lawrence of Arabia," "The Bridge on the River Kwai," "Dr. HD," "Brief Encounter" and "A Passage to India." Lean died in April at the age of 83.The Rev. Eric Evans, dean of St. Paul's, echoed the words spoken of Lawrence of Arabia in that same cathedral in Lean's film, calling the director "one of the most extraordinary men of our age and our generation."
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
"Brief Encounter," David Lean's 1945 movie based on a Noel Coward play about a thwarted romance, has long been spoken of with great reverence and routinely accorded four-star status. Personally, I'd shave off a half a star, if only because the soundtrack is so overstuffed with Rachmaninoff's surging, sighing Piano Concerto No. 2. Still, count me among those who treasure the film. Count me, too, among those who find much to savor in the theatrical version of "Brief Encounter," created by the U.K.-based troupe called Kneehigh in 2008.
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By Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 25, 1991
Officials at Tri-Star, which was to release "Nostromo," the $40 million film renowned British director David Lean was preparing before his death last week at 83, say they have no plans to go forward with the film.Based on the Joseph Conrad novel and starring Dennis Quaid and Isabella Rossellini, "Nostromo" had been scheduled to start filming March 4 in France.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2010
After critics flayed him for the swoony lyricism of "Ryan's Daughter," David Lean said he could have justified that film's picture-postcard love imagery by having a priest tell the heroine that she was "seeing the world through rose-colored glasses." And why not? A similar strategy had worked niftily for Lean before, in the elegant 1955 romance "Summertime," playing this weekend in a restored print at the Charles. In the opening scene, Lean depicts a single, 40ish woman, Jane Hudson ( Katharine Hepburn)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 17, 1991
David Lean, who died yesterday in London at 83, made large films about war and small films about love that seemed to have nothing in common except excellence. But they were in some way the same film, about the same struggle -- the battle between passion and duty.Lean was born in a London suburb to an accountant in 1908 and, after a Quaker boyhood leavened by a secret life spent sneaking off to the movies, he entered the British film industry as a teen-ager in the lowest entry position: tea boy. And the humility of that position never seemed to leave him. Even his most panoramic films, such as "The Bridge on the River Kwai" and "Lawrence of Arabia," were a tea boy's films: polite, well-modulated, discreet and ironic.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 5, 2004
Look upon me!" commanded Dickens' Ghost of Christmas Present. "You have never seen the like of me before!" Look upon the works of Dickens' best adapter, David Lean; we will never see the like of him again. When Lean, the total filmmaker, died at age 83 on April 17, 1991, the last creative giant of Britain's classical cinema was gone. An acclaimed director of Noel Coward from the start of his career, Lean achieved his true artistic breakthrough with his thrilling rendering of Dickens' 1861 novel, Great Expectations (1946)
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | April 17, 1991
MENTION THE name of David Lean, and the word that comes immediately to mind is epic. Lean, British-born film director who died yesterday at the age of 83, was responsible for films like ''Bridge on the River Kwai'' (1957), ''Lawrence of Arabia'' (1962), ''Dr. HD (1965), ''Ryan's Daughter'' (1970) and, most recently, ''Passage to India'' (1984).His movies won 28 Academy Awards, including two for Best Director for "Lawrence" and "Kwai." ''Lawrence" won seven.Lean began his career doing smaller films.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Movie Critic | September 14, 1990
He's back and, boy, do we need him now.He's T.E. Lawrence, scourge of the desert, who is returning to the epic screen at the Senator in the form of 70-millimeter print of David Lean's 1962 classic, "Lawrence of Arabia."According to Tom Kiefaber, the owner of the Senator, the original five-week run of "Lawrence" played to more than 20,000 patrons in the spring of last year. On its last night, a Tuesday, more than 200 people were turned away from the 900-seat theater on York Road."Since then," Kiefaber says, "I've been barraged with calls requesting its return.
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By Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Is there room on the Atlantic Ocean -- and on the big screen -- for two Christopher Columbuses?There was room last week in the trade papers for splashy multi-page ads touting two such projects, both to be released in 1992 to capitalize on the 500th anniversary of the Italian explorer's voyage to North America in the service of Spain.Producers Alexander and Ilya Salkind are working with a script by Mario Puzo, "Christopher Columbus: The Movie," with plans to begin shooting in April.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 1, 2002
Andre de Toth, who died last Sunday of an aneurysm at the age of 89, led three Hollywood lives. He's notorious as the one-eyed director of the best 3-D movie, 1953's House of Wax. (The next year he made a less successful 3-D movie, The Stranger Wore a Gun.) But he was also the auteur behind cult films like None Shall Escape (1944) and Crime Wave (1954), and the uncredited second-unit director on two wildly different epics, Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and Superman (1978). Combined, his 1994 memoir Fragments and his 1996 interview book, De Toth on De Toth cover all that - as well as his youth and early film career in Hungary, his stint making Italian spectacles like Morgan the Pirate (1961)
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By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | December 5, 2008
Filmmaker Baz Luhrmann calls them "banquets of cinema," visual and narrative feasts that offer audiences drama, romance, comedy and that sweeping feeling of being transported to another world. In other words: an epic. Creating an epic is not for the faint of heart or those with limited ambition, which is why the audacious Luhrmann - who reconceived the movie musical with Moulin Rouge! and the Shakespearean tragedy with Romeo + Juliet - deliberately aimed his latest film, Australia, to be on a, well, epic scale.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 5, 2004
Look upon me!" commanded Dickens' Ghost of Christmas Present. "You have never seen the like of me before!" Look upon the works of Dickens' best adapter, David Lean; we will never see the like of him again. When Lean, the total filmmaker, died at age 83 on April 17, 1991, the last creative giant of Britain's classical cinema was gone. An acclaimed director of Noel Coward from the start of his career, Lean achieved his true artistic breakthrough with his thrilling rendering of Dickens' 1861 novel, Great Expectations (1946)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 1, 2002
Andre de Toth, who died last Sunday of an aneurysm at the age of 89, led three Hollywood lives. He's notorious as the one-eyed director of the best 3-D movie, 1953's House of Wax. (The next year he made a less successful 3-D movie, The Stranger Wore a Gun.) But he was also the auteur behind cult films like None Shall Escape (1944) and Crime Wave (1954), and the uncredited second-unit director on two wildly different epics, Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and Superman (1978). Combined, his 1994 memoir Fragments and his 1996 interview book, De Toth on De Toth cover all that - as well as his youth and early film career in Hungary, his stint making Italian spectacles like Morgan the Pirate (1961)
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 25, 1999
KANCHANABURI, Thailand -- Here on the banks of the River Kwai, the sun shines bright and brutal. Standing, wondering, in its glare, the imagination fails. During World War II, the Japanese forced 69,000 American and other Allied prisoners, along with 200,000 Asian conscripts, to build a railroad here. They were ill-fed; medical care was poor; malaria and beriberi attacked relentlessly; the work was set at an impossible pace. And the sun beat down. The suffering, the price paid in that war, is nearly beyond comprehension 57 years later.
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By New York Times News Service | October 5, 1991
LONDON -- The actors Peter O'Toole, Sir Alec Guinness, Sarah Miles, Tom Courtenay and Omar Sharif were among the 800 people who gathered Thursday at St. Paul's Cathedral to honor Sir David Lean, the director of films including "Lawrence of Arabia," "The Bridge on the River Kwai," "Dr. HD," "Brief Encounter" and "A Passage to India." Lean died in April at the age of 83.The Rev. Eric Evans, dean of St. Paul's, echoed the words spoken of Lawrence of Arabia in that same cathedral in Lean's film, calling the director "one of the most extraordinary men of our age and our generation."
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 25, 1991
Officials at Tri-Star, which was to release "Nostromo," the $40 million film renowned British director David Lean was preparing before his death last week at 83, say they have no plans to go forward with the film.Based on the Joseph Conrad novel and starring Dennis Quaid and Isabella Rossellini, "Nostromo" had been scheduled to start filming March 4 in France.
NEWS
By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | December 5, 2008
Filmmaker Baz Luhrmann calls them "banquets of cinema," visual and narrative feasts that offer audiences drama, romance, comedy and that sweeping feeling of being transported to another world. In other words: an epic. Creating an epic is not for the faint of heart or those with limited ambition, which is why the audacious Luhrmann - who reconceived the movie musical with Moulin Rouge! and the Shakespearean tragedy with Romeo + Juliet - deliberately aimed his latest film, Australia, to be on a, well, epic scale.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
"Brief Encounter," David Lean's 1945 movie based on a Noel Coward play about a thwarted romance, has long been spoken of with great reverence and routinely accorded four-star status. Personally, I'd shave off a half a star, if only because the soundtrack is so overstuffed with Rachmaninoff's surging, sighing Piano Concerto No. 2. Still, count me among those who treasure the film. Count me, too, among those who find much to savor in the theatrical version of "Brief Encounter," created by the U.K.-based troupe called Kneehigh in 2008.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | April 17, 1991
MENTION THE name of David Lean, and the word that comes immediately to mind is epic. Lean, British-born film director who died yesterday at the age of 83, was responsible for films like ''Bridge on the River Kwai'' (1957), ''Lawrence of Arabia'' (1962), ''Dr. HD (1965), ''Ryan's Daughter'' (1970) and, most recently, ''Passage to India'' (1984).His movies won 28 Academy Awards, including two for Best Director for "Lawrence" and "Kwai." ''Lawrence" won seven.Lean began his career doing smaller films.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 17, 1991
David Lean, who died yesterday in London at 83, made large films about war and small films about love that seemed to have nothing in common except excellence. But they were in some way the same film, about the same struggle -- the battle between passion and duty.Lean was born in a London suburb to an accountant in 1908 and, after a Quaker boyhood leavened by a secret life spent sneaking off to the movies, he entered the British film industry as a teen-ager in the lowest entry position: tea boy. And the humility of that position never seemed to leave him. Even his most panoramic films, such as "The Bridge on the River Kwai" and "Lawrence of Arabia," were a tea boy's films: polite, well-modulated, discreet and ironic.
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