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David Kennedy

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NEWS
June 20, 2006
On June 18, 2006, THELMA H. (nee Wingate); beloved wife of Frederick A. Cornell, Jr.; devoted mother of Frederick Cornell III, Karen Cornell and Virginia Kennedy and the late David and Catherine M. Cornell; loving grandmother of Frederick Cornell IV, Patrick and Christ Cornell, David Kennedy; great grandmother of Angelina Cornell. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road, on Tuesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held on Wednesday 12 noon.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 20, 2014
"O'Malley smiled and read his mail," David Kennedy, the widely respected criminologist, recalls of a December 1999 meeting with the new mayor of Baltimore. Martin O'Malley sat by while Jack Maple, his crime-fighting consultant from New York City, browbeat Kennedy, peppered him with questions, cut off his answers and either betrayed or feigned ignorance of Kennedy's violence-reducing strategy called Ceasefire. Kennedy recalls the exchange in his 2012 book, "Don't Shoot: One Man, a Street Fellowship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | January 19, 2006
The Board of Public Works approved a $250,000 settlement yesterday for a former correctional officer who accused two supervisors of sexual harassment. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp voted for the settlement and Comptroller William Donald Schaefer abstained, according to a spokesman for the governor. An employee of the department from May 2001 to October 2002, Lashawn Jones, 33, had filed a lawsuit against the state; the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services; John Snowden, a lieutenant in the department; and Frederick Taylor, a correctional officer who sometimes supervised Jones.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
In today's Baltimore Sun, I wrote about well-known c riminologist David M. Kennedy making a comeback to Baltimore . His approach to violence reduction, often referred to as Ceasefire, was tried here in the late 1990s, and never really got off the ground. But it had worked before then, and has been embraced by leaders across the country with good results since. Baltimore and Kennedy both want to give it another try. I spoke with Kennedy earlier this week about his views on inner city violence and Baltimore, much of which couldn't fit into today's article.
NEWS
December 14, 2013
A fter days of furious searching for Marcus "Chip" Lesane, missing and presumed dead, Baltimore homicide detectives brought his childhood friend -- the last person to see him alive -- into an interrogation room. They spent eight hours questioning him, but Dawnta Baskerville wasn't talking. There was another option left. They opened the door to the chilly, brightly lit room and let in Lesane's older brother, then stepped back as he took a seat across from Baskerville. Robert Lesane was no cop, and the 29-year-old shuttle bus driver's law enforcement experience consisted of watching "The First 48," the reality series about detective work.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 20, 2014
"O'Malley smiled and read his mail," David Kennedy, the widely respected criminologist, recalls of a December 1999 meeting with the new mayor of Baltimore. Martin O'Malley sat by while Jack Maple, his crime-fighting consultant from New York City, browbeat Kennedy, peppered him with questions, cut off his answers and either betrayed or feigned ignorance of Kennedy's violence-reducing strategy called Ceasefire. Kennedy recalls the exchange in his 2012 book, "Don't Shoot: One Man, a Street Fellowship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Gus G. Sentementes and Madison Park and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporters | December 22, 2007
The man charged in what a prosecutor described yesterday as a "violent rampage" at a Harford County manufacturing plant stabbed not only his estranged wife but also her current boyfriend, according to newly released court documents. David Daniel Kennedy - a man with mental health problems whose marriage broke apart a few weeks ago, according to his relatives - told police after his arrest that he wanted to kill his wife, the court records show. As he was ordered held without bond, the woman, Beth Kennedy, remained in serious condition at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | February 2, 1992
Jury selection started Friday for the trial of two brothers charged with beating three men outside an Aberdeen bar in May.Their father was convicted last week of attempting to murder their mother.David D. Kennedy, 22, of Havre de Grace, and his brother, CharlesKennedy Jr., 28, of Aberdeen, each face five counts of battery and other charges, court records say.The Kennedys are the sons of Charles Kennedy Sr., 50, who was found guilty of attempted murder, assault and two weapons charges by a jury of 12 men on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1997
At a rousing interfaith breakfast yesterday, the national leader of the "One Church-One Addict" program and Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend called on more Baltimore congregations to "adopt" a drug addict on the road to recovery.The Rev. George Clements, a priest who won a MacArthur Foundation "genius" award for his social activism in Chicago, founded the program in 1994 as part of a White House offensive against drug use. Maryland and his home state of Illinois were the first to have pilot programs in which religious congregations volunteer to help people out of the quicksand of addiction.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1999
A dispute about how to implement a Harvard University criminologist's plan to reduce homicides might have cost Baltimore its ranking in obtaining a federal grant to help track crime patterns in city neighborhoods.The National Institute of Justice (NIJ), an arm of the U.S. Justice Department, had planned to select a recipient on July 21, the day The Sun reported a rift between state and federal prosecutors that indefinitely delayed the announcement of the anti-crime program.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Melanie Wilson, the deputy director of the city planning department, said local officials had been confident about getting the five-year grant, which is worth more than $2 million.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
In the late 1990s, David M. Kennedy came to Baltimore riding high in criminology circles, eager to prove his unorthodox approach - which had reduced gun violence in Boston and Minneapolis - could work in one of America's most dangerous cities. It was, by most measurements, a disaster and an experience that pushed him to the brink. Fifteen years later, Kennedy is ready to try again, buoyed by successes in more than 60 other cities and widespread embrace of a philosophy once questioned as a gimmick.
NEWS
December 14, 2013
A fter days of furious searching for Marcus "Chip" Lesane, missing and presumed dead, Baltimore homicide detectives brought his childhood friend -- the last person to see him alive -- into an interrogation room. They spent eight hours questioning him, but Dawnta Baskerville wasn't talking. There was another option left. They opened the door to the chilly, brightly lit room and let in Lesane's older brother, then stepped back as he took a seat across from Baskerville. Robert Lesane was no cop, and the 29-year-old shuttle bus driver's law enforcement experience consisted of watching "The First 48," the reality series about detective work.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Gus G. Sentementes and Madison Park and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporters | December 22, 2007
The man charged in what a prosecutor described yesterday as a "violent rampage" at a Harford County manufacturing plant stabbed not only his estranged wife but also her current boyfriend, according to newly released court documents. David Daniel Kennedy - a man with mental health problems whose marriage broke apart a few weeks ago, according to his relatives - told police after his arrest that he wanted to kill his wife, the court records show. As he was ordered held without bond, the woman, Beth Kennedy, remained in serious condition at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
June 20, 2006
On June 18, 2006, THELMA H. (nee Wingate); beloved wife of Frederick A. Cornell, Jr.; devoted mother of Frederick Cornell III, Karen Cornell and Virginia Kennedy and the late David and Catherine M. Cornell; loving grandmother of Frederick Cornell IV, Patrick and Christ Cornell, David Kennedy; great grandmother of Angelina Cornell. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road, on Tuesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held on Wednesday 12 noon.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | January 19, 2006
The Board of Public Works approved a $250,000 settlement yesterday for a former correctional officer who accused two supervisors of sexual harassment. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp voted for the settlement and Comptroller William Donald Schaefer abstained, according to a spokesman for the governor. An employee of the department from May 2001 to October 2002, Lashawn Jones, 33, had filed a lawsuit against the state; the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services; John Snowden, a lieutenant in the department; and Frederick Taylor, a correctional officer who sometimes supervised Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 17, 2005
While television is often blamed for everything from shortened attention spans to college students who cannot name a president before Ronald Reagan, two productions this month about Franklin Delano Roosevelt suggest that television also can illuminate history through evocative storytelling. FDR: A Presidency Revealed, a four-hour special starting tonight on the History Channel, and Warm Springs, an inspirational HBO film starring Kenneth Branagh about Roosevelt's struggle with polio, not only remember the 32nd president of the United States, but also bring his indomitable spirit back to life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 17, 2005
While television is often blamed for everything from shortened attention spans to college students who cannot name a president before Ronald Reagan, two productions this month about Franklin Delano Roosevelt suggest that television also can illuminate history through evocative storytelling. FDR: A Presidency Revealed, a four-hour special starting tonight on the History Channel, and Warm Springs, an inspirational HBO film starring Kenneth Branagh about Roosevelt's struggle with polio, not only remember the 32nd president of the United States, but also bring his indomitable spirit back to life.
NEWS
February 6, 1991
David A. Kennedy Jr., retired registrar and teacher for 40 years at Loyola High School, died Monday of heart failure at St. Joseph Hospital. He was 84.A mass of Christian burial for Mr. Kennedy will be offered at 10 a.m. tomorrow at Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, 65 Sacred Heart Lane, Glyndon.Mr. Kennedy, who lived on Leyton Road in Reisterstown, retired in 1977 and had been registrar since 1942. Although he was primarily a history teacher, he also taught French, Latin and science.The school's field house was named for him in 1967, and he received the school's Blake Medal and Loyola College's Maryland Medal.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1999
A dispute about how to implement a Harvard University criminologist's plan to reduce homicides might have cost Baltimore its ranking in obtaining a federal grant to help track crime patterns in city neighborhoods.The National Institute of Justice (NIJ), an arm of the U.S. Justice Department, had planned to select a recipient on July 21, the day The Sun reported a rift between state and federal prosecutors that indefinitely delayed the announcement of the anti-crime program.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Melanie Wilson, the deputy director of the city planning department, said local officials had been confident about getting the five-year grant, which is worth more than $2 million.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1997
At a rousing interfaith breakfast yesterday, the national leader of the "One Church-One Addict" program and Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend called on more Baltimore congregations to "adopt" a drug addict on the road to recovery.The Rev. George Clements, a priest who won a MacArthur Foundation "genius" award for his social activism in Chicago, founded the program in 1994 as part of a White House offensive against drug use. Maryland and his home state of Illinois were the first to have pilot programs in which religious congregations volunteer to help people out of the quicksand of addiction.
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