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David Hoffman

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NEWS
June 15, 2008
True Sisters Inc. regrets the passing of DAVID HOFFMAN, beloved son of P.P. and Life Member, Sylvia Hoffman, and extends sympathy to the family.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
When Eddie Bartee started working at the Sparrows Point steel mill in 1955, about 35,000 men toiled at the eastern Baltimore County plant. Over the next four decades, he made a comfortable life for his wife and their six children as he moved through the ranks at the mill. Now, with the plant closed and machinery being sold for scrap, Bartee and other steelworkers are teaming with University of Maryland Baltimore County students and professors to record their stories. The students are making a website and helping with a documentary to preserve the history of the plant.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1995
A credit line was inadvertently omitted Sunday from computer images accompanying an article on minimal surfaces displayed in an exhibit at the Maryland Science Center. The images were created by James T. Hoffman of the University of Massachusetts.The Sun regrets the error.Samba dancers' headdresses, soap-film architecture and alien "flowers" that swallow your hands.These aren't things most of us wrestled with in math class. They are, however, part of the bizarre scenery you encounter when you enter the world of Costa surfaces, among the latest discoveries in a cranny of modern mathematics called "minimal surfaces."
NEWS
June 15, 2008
True Sisters Inc. regrets the passing of DAVID HOFFMAN, beloved son of P.P. and Life Member, Sylvia Hoffman, and extends sympathy to the family.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
When Eddie Bartee started working at the Sparrows Point steel mill in 1955, about 35,000 men toiled at the eastern Baltimore County plant. Over the next four decades, he made a comfortable life for his wife and their six children as he moved through the ranks at the mill. Now, with the plant closed and machinery being sold for scrap, Bartee and other steelworkers are teaming with University of Maryland Baltimore County students and professors to record their stories. The students are making a website and helping with a documentary to preserve the history of the plant.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1999
CHICAGO -- Gale Gand recalls her favorite toy the way others speak of childhood's first bikes, pets and baseball gloves. Her early years were marked strictly BEB and AEB: Before Easy-Bake and After Easy-Bake.On Wednesday, she returns to the warmth of her childhood companion, the little oven that Gand unwrapped on her sixth Christmas. In the West Court of Chicago's cavernous Museum of Science and Industry, the award-winning pastry chef will light up her 100-watt-bulb-powered Easy-Bake and make magic for the crowd.
FEATURES
By ROGER SIMON and ROGER SIMON,Roger Simon is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Sun. This excerpt is from his new book, "Road Show," published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Copyright 1990 by Roger Simon. Reprinted with permission | November 11, 1990
"By the time we're finished, they're going to wonder whether Willie Horton is Dukakis' running mate."--Lee AtwaterHe was big. He was black. He was every guy you ever crossed street to avoid, every pair of smoldering eyes you ever looked away from on the bus or subway. He was every person you moved out of the city to escape, every sound in the night that made you get up and check the locks on the windows and grab the door handles and give them an extra tug.Whether you were white or black or red or yellow, Willie Horton was your worst nightmare.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 20, 1991
"Making Sense of the Sixties" is six hours of television that is short on memory and devoid of any real vision. That can make for frustrating viewing -- a long trip via the television set that ultimately takes you almost nowhere in terms of understanding the 1960s or the demographic bulge known as baby boomers, which entered early adulthood then and has dominated American popular culture ever since.But that doesn't mean "Making Sense of the Sixties," which begins at 9 tomorrow on MPT (Channels 22 and 67)
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1998
Keenan Kester Cofield is the man who sued too much.In Alabama he sued his guards while in prison and the Burger King where he ate on work release. And in Tennessee he sued a newspaper in which he placed his own obituary.Last year, after moving to Maryland, Cofield -- whom one federal judge labeled "a gadfly and an exploiter of the court system" -- began testing the patience of Baltimore County's court system as well, this time using the name Lord Keenan Kester Cofield.After he and his wife were refused extra sauce for their chicken nuggets, they sued McDonald's Corp.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
On Wednesday, March 8, 2006, ROBERT M., of Winfield; beloved husband of Anita M. (nee Simon); devoted father of Lawrence and Bernadette Wild, Richard Wild, Timothy and Lisa Wild, Virginia and David Hoffman, Thomas and Michelle Wild. Also survived by nine grandchildren. Friends may call at the Burrier-Queen Funeral Home & Crematory, P.A., 1212 W. Old Liberty Road, Winfield (beside S. Carroll High School), on Tuesday from 7 to 9 P.M. and Wednesday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Rosary Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Funeral Liturgy (Mass)
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1999
CHICAGO -- Gale Gand recalls her favorite toy the way others speak of childhood's first bikes, pets and baseball gloves. Her early years were marked strictly BEB and AEB: Before Easy-Bake and After Easy-Bake.On Wednesday, she returns to the warmth of her childhood companion, the little oven that Gand unwrapped on her sixth Christmas. In the West Court of Chicago's cavernous Museum of Science and Industry, the award-winning pastry chef will light up her 100-watt-bulb-powered Easy-Bake and make magic for the crowd.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1995
A credit line was inadvertently omitted Sunday from computer images accompanying an article on minimal surfaces displayed in an exhibit at the Maryland Science Center. The images were created by James T. Hoffman of the University of Massachusetts.The Sun regrets the error.Samba dancers' headdresses, soap-film architecture and alien "flowers" that swallow your hands.These aren't things most of us wrestled with in math class. They are, however, part of the bizarre scenery you encounter when you enter the world of Costa surfaces, among the latest discoveries in a cranny of modern mathematics called "minimal surfaces."
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